Fresh Lipstick: Redressing Fashion and Feminism

Overview

"Marching through 150 years of American dress history, Scott rips down feminism's favorite positions on fashion - from the power of images to the purpose of makeup. The illustrative examples - from flappers to Twiggy to body-piercing - are often poignant, occasionally infuriating, but always illuminating and thought-provoking." With Fresh Lipstick, Linda Scott gives women the ammunition to settle the fashion debate once and for all. She challenges feminists to move beyond appearances and to return their focus to the true mission of the moment:
... See more details below
Paperback (First Edition)
$22.59
BN.com price
(Save 9%)$25.00 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (14) from $3.50   
  • New (9) from $10.00   
  • Used (5) from $3.50   
Sending request ...

Overview

"Marching through 150 years of American dress history, Scott rips down feminism's favorite positions on fashion - from the power of images to the purpose of makeup. The illustrative examples - from flappers to Twiggy to body-piercing - are often poignant, occasionally infuriating, but always illuminating and thought-provoking." With Fresh Lipstick, Linda Scott gives women the ammunition to settle the fashion debate once and for all. She challenges feminists to move beyond appearances and to return their focus to the true mission of the moment: equality for all women everywhere.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Though it is pro-primping, this book might make you put down the highlighting kit and grab a highlighter, becuase it's so packed with facts and controversy. But some of its content— like an old graphic that shows Ms. Steinem as quite the style icon herself— is just plain (not plain-Jane) fun, much like fashion itself."—Paula Wehmeyer, BUST

"Thanks to Fresh Lipstick feminism will be fashionable. For those who shun Madison Avenue as well as those who indulge their inner consumer, Linda Scott uses historical anecdotes and strong opinions to make the case for feminism to more honestly approach beauty and fashion."—Amy Richards, co-author of Manifesta: Young Women, Feminism and the Future and Grassroots: A Field Guide to Feminist Activism

"This is a brilliant work that establishes Linda Scott as the leading academic commentator in the country on women, fashion, and advertising and our most perceptive thinker on the cultural understanding of advertising."— Michael Schudson, author of The Good Citizen, Watergate in American Memory, and Professor of Sociology and Communications, UC-San Diego

"Wow! Linda Scott has written a fresh, provocative and fun look at feminism and fashion. For too long leading feminists have told women that everything from high heels to lipstick is oppressive. Linda Scott shows us how the most oppressive voice is the feminists themselves. With exemplary research she documents the puritanical and classist motives of the women's movement in their judgments of fashion, and arrives at the conclusion women have been waiting for: you can be feminine and a feminist."—Rene Denfeld, journalist and author of The New Victorians: A Young Woman's Challenge to the Old Feminist Order

"Every once in a while a book appears that separates smoke from fire. This is one of those books. Fashion and feminism have endlessly sparked polemics, but how fair and accurate were they? On every page Linda Scott shows who the smoke blowers were. Then she lights a fire of her own that will burn for generations."—James B. Twitchell, author of Branded Nation, Living It Up: America's Love Affair with Luxury, and Adcult

Publishers Weekly
In this strident, well researched and sometimes exhausting critique of the women's movement's strains of "antibeauty ideology," Scott, an associate professor at the University of Illinois, argues that feminist doesn't have to mean frumpy. It won't be news to post Sex and the City "do-me" feminists, but adornment, Scott insists, is a natural, inherently positive way for women to express their identities; fashion is neither the instrument of male oppression that members of the mid-19th-century anti-corset "dress reform" movement insisted it was nor the vehicle for sexual exploitation (or signal of antifeminist backlash) that some contemporary feminists suggest it is. Beginning with Susan B. Anthony's prudish rejection of stylish Elizabeth Oakes Smith at the 1852 Women's Convention, academic and upper-class feminists have consistently discredited women (especially of lower classes) who don't fit the mold, Scott argues. Scott's analysis extends to what she sees as today's antibeauty books and films (e.g., Naomi Wolf's The Beauty Myth, Jean Kilbourne's Killing Us Softly movies), which she argues are hypocritical, reductionist and, at worst, classist. Scott is most convincing when she argues for the liberating capacity of fashion: "By ignoring the way that self-decoration expresses the human force of creative expression...[;] and by denying the strength these practices can bring at depression, dislocation, and even death, the antibeauty critique engages in cultural cruelty." But she sometimes falters, as when she glosses over the media and fashion industry's relationship to the very real danger of eating disorders. (Jan.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Scott (advertising & women's studies, Univ. of Illinois) contends that leaders in the women's movement-from Susan B. Anthony to Gloria Steinem-have misled women by suggesting what they ought (and ought not) be wearing. Scott disputes the claim that a patriarchal fashion industry has been oppressing women and offers a detailed and revealing analysis of women's magazines and advertisements with a focus on the women involved in their publication. Scott argues that, from the beginning, the feminist movement has been dominated by white, educated, financially comfortable women who have not considered the concerns of women from other social classes or ethnic groups. She observes that body decoration is practiced by men and women in cultures worldwide and is a valid means of self-expression, arguing that feminists should stop being concerned with what women wear and focus on important issues like jobs and discrimination. This well-researched, enlightening, and provocative book is recommended for academic and large public libraries.-Debra Moore, Cerritos Coll., Norwalk, CA Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781403971340
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
  • Publication date: 2/21/2006
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Pages: 368
  • Sales rank: 1,041,810
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.82 (d)

Meet the Author

Linda M. Scott has spent years researching media and women's issues. She is associate professor in art and design, communications, and women's studies at University of Illinois and research associate professor, Institute of Communications Research.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction: Tossing Down the Glove

• The Natural Fallacy

• Dress Reform and Domination

• Making the Myth

• Untold Stories, Unknown Heroines, Unconsidered Alternatives

• Reading the Popular Image

• The Power of Fashion

• Sex, Soap, and Cinderella

• Rethinking Necessities

• Warring Images

• Freudian Feminism and Commercial Conspiracy

• Something Different

• Style and Substance in the Second Wave

• Exclusive Rights

• Fresh Lipstick

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)