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Freud and the Far East: Psychoanalytic Perspectives on the People and Culture of China, Japan, and Korea
     

Freud and the Far East: Psychoanalytic Perspectives on the People and Culture of China, Japan, and Korea

3.6 3
by Salman Akhtar, June Cai, Lois Choi-Kain, June Chu, Daniel Freeman
 

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ISBN-10: 0765706938

ISBN-13: 9780765706935

Pub. Date: 07/28/2009

Publisher: Aronson, Jason Inc.

In Freud and the Far East, distinguished psychoanalysts from East and West provide meticulous historical accounts of the development of psychoanalysis in Japan, Korea, and China. The contributors to the book discuss the depth-psychological concepts of amae and wa, the Ajase complex, and the filial piety complex, underscoring the intricate interplay of drive and ego

Overview

In Freud and the Far East, distinguished psychoanalysts from East and West provide meticulous historical accounts of the development of psychoanalysis in Japan, Korea, and China. The contributors to the book discuss the depth-psychological concepts of amae and wa, the Ajase complex, and the filial piety complex, underscoring the intricate interplay of drive and ego development with the powerful forces of ancestral legacies and their attendant myths and fantasies. The book offers insights into the psychosocial trials and tribulations of the immigrant populations from these countries and their Western-born offspring. Implications of such understanding for the conduct of psychotherapy and psychoanalysis are also discussed. Offering a vast panopoly of fables and folklore, fiction and poetry, psychosocial observations and films, the book seeks to enlighten Western therapists regarding the cultural nuances with which their Far Eastern patients' emotional problems emerge in the clinical situation.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780765706935
Publisher:
Aronson, Jason Inc.
Publication date:
07/28/2009
Pages:
338
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.20(d)

Related Subjects

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments ix

Introduction 1

Part I Tales and Terrains

1 Psychoanalysis in Japan Keigo Okinogi 9

2 Psychoanalysis in Korea Do-Un Jeong David Sachs 27

3 Psychoanalysis in China Douglas Kirsner Elise Snyder 43

Part II Traditions and Transformations

4 Two Kinds of Guilt Feelings: The Ajase Complex Heisaku Kosawa 61

5 Amae: East and West Daniel Freeman 71

6 Wa: Harmony and Sustenance of the Self in Japanese Life Mark Moore 79

7 Psychoanalysis in the "Shame Culture" of Japan: A "Dramatic" Point of View Osamu Kitayama 89

8 The Butterfly Lovers: Psychodynamic Reflections on the Ancient Chinese Love Story "Liang-Zhu" June Cai 105

9 The Filial Piety Complex: Variations on the Oedipus Theme in Chinese Literature and Culture Ming Dong Gu 115

10 Transformation of Korean Women: From Tradition to Modernity Mikyum Kim 137

11 The Food-Sex Equation: Psychoanalytic Reflections on Three Sizzling Movies from the Far East Salman Akhtar Monisha Nayar 161

12 Zen, Martial Arts, and Psychoanalysis in Training the Mind of the Psychotherapist Stuart Twemlow 175

Part III Transpositions and Techniques

13 The Chinese American Family: Some Psychoanalytic Speculations June Y. Chu 199

14 Second-Generation Korean Americans Lois Choi-Kain 215

15 An American-Japanese Transcultural Psychoanalysis and the Issue of Teacher Transference Yasuhiko Taketomo 235

16 Naikan-A Buddhist Self-Reflective Approach: Psychoanalytic and Cultural Reflections Adeline van Waning 255

17 Psychoanalytic Therapy across Civilizations: Asians and Asian Americans Alan Roland 275

References 293

Index 311

About the Contributors 325

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Freud and the Far East: Psychoanalytic Perspectives on the People and Culture of China, Japan, and Korea 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Blacknight: *pads in watching nightpaw* Nightpaw: *pads in* Did you want to talk dad? He asks. How did you know? Asks blacknight. Just an instinct. Shrugs nightpaw. Well..... kinda. Answers bn half heartedly. The kits? Yea.......did u know? Yea...i could tell from ur expression. Oh...thats good.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The book editor is pretty creative to put together the materials from several Asian cultures (Chinese, Japanese, and Korean) and Freudianism together. Apparently, there has been a trend in psychoanalytic field to expand their market and territory to China (who wouldn't want to earn more money there these days?). Unfortunately, here among the authors who wrote about Chinese, the two who reported about psychoanalysis in China as well as the status of Chinese American pursuing psychoanalysis in the US are apparently not Chinese and know little about it. To begin with, what the Chapter authors wrote about Chinese from The Mainland China not having opportunity to study psychoanalysis in the US is absolutely false - Chinese like all other foreign scholars who are in the US have the opportunity to go to schools again or get in psychiatry residency training after passing graduate medical exams; from there, there are good opportunities to study psychoanalysis as they wish. Thus, the opportunity isn't an issue as it says in that book chapter. The critical issue here is not only Chinese immigrants but also American born Chinese physicians or psychologists have little interest in studying psychoanalysis as a profession and few get involved in the field. Part of the reason is that it's not practical in the society anymore from cost and benefit point of view. But nobody seems to really care if other reasons among them. Secondly, the authors of that particular chapter disregarded a serious debate in their field on safety issue (and potential ethics) of practicing psychoanalysis in China using Skype. The debate was reflected in two issues of The American Psychoanalysts in 2008 (Vol. 42) [see American Psychoanalytic Asso. publication on the web]). One side of the debate basically has concerns for Chinese government censorship over internet, including through Skype program, just as the Skype company admitted itself that its technology is not completely infallible ([...]). Interestingly, those who insist on pursuing the practice (CAPA), including that chapter authors vowed for Skype safety much more strongly than Skype company itself. ... Another big shortcoming of this book is that it omits HongKong Chinese and Taiwan Chinese, not to mention Singaporean Chinese that consists its over 80% population, as if only The Mainland China has Chinese and only those Chinese has psychology that's worth mentioning. Little do they know that Chinese traditions are far better preserved in Taiwan and Hong Kong than those in The Mainland. Therefore, in terms of Chinese culture and psychology, there is a big hole in this book. However, overall, it's an interesting read from anthropology and psychology point of view. It is intellectually stimulating. I hope that the editor will be more careful with regard to publishing materials from other authors - check evidence instead of one's claimed title.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The book editor is pretty creative to put together the materials from several Asian cultures (Chinese, Japanese, and Korean) and Freudianism together. Apparently, there has been a trend in psychoanalytic field to expand their market and territory to China (who wouldn't want to earn more money there these days?). Unfortunately, here among the authors who wrote about Chinese, the two who reported about psychoanalysis in China as well as the status of Chinese American pursuing psychoanalysis in the US are apparently not Chinese and know little about it. To begin with, what the Chapter authors wrote about Chinese from The Mainland China not having opportunity to study psychoanalysis in the US is absolutely false - Chinese like all other foreign scholars who are in the US have the opportunity to go to schools again or get in psychiatry residency training after passing graduate medical exams; from there, there are good opportunities to study psychoanalysis as they wish. Thus, the opportunity isn't an issue as it says in that book chapter. The critical issue here is not only Chinese immigrants but also American born Chinese physicians or psychologists have little interest in studying psychoanalysis as a profession and few got involved in the field. Part of the reason is that it's not practical in the society anymore from cost and benefit point of view. But nobody seems to really care if other reasons among them. Secondly, the authors of that particular chapter disregarded a serious debate in their field on safety issue (and potential ethics) of practicing psychoanalysis in China using Skype. The debate was reflected in two issues of The American Psychoanalysts in 2008 (Vol. 42) [http://www.apsa.org/Publications/The_American_Psychoanalyst.aspx]). One side of the debate basically have concerns for Chinese government censorship over internet, including Skype, just as the Skype company admitted itself that its technology is not completely infallible (http://www.betanews.com/article/Skype-admits-security-breach-in-China/1223053868). Interestingly, those who insist on pursuing the practice (CAPA), including that chapter authors vowed for Skype safety much more strongly than Skype company itself. ... Another big shortcoming of this book is that it omits HongKong Chinese and Taiwan Chinese, not to mention Singaporean Chinese that consists its over 80% population, as if only The Mainland China has Chinese and only those Chinese has psychology that's worth mentioning. Little do they know that Chinese traditions are far better preserved in Taiwan and Hong Kong than those in The Mainland. Therefore, in terms of Chinese culture and psychology, there is a big hole in the book. However, overall, it's an interesting read from anthropology and psychology point of view. It is intellectually stimulating. I hope that the editor will be more careful with regard to publishing materials from other authors - check evidence instead of one's claimed title.