Freud and the Far East: Psychoanalytic Perspectives on the People and Culture of China, Japan, and Korea

Hardcover (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $81.00
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 7%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (5) from $81.00   
  • New (3) from $81.00   
  • Used (2) from $106.74   

Overview

This book is a lexical ambassador with the dual responsibility of bridging the West and East and enhancing psychoanalytic conceptualization in the course of such an encounter. By juxtaposing the familiar with the unfamiliar, it seeks to enrich our understanding of both. Within its pages, distinguished psychoanalysts from East and West weave a fine and colorful tapestry of the ubiquitous and idiosyncratic, the plebian and profound, and the neurotically-inclined and culturally-nuanced. They provide meticulous historical accounts of the development of psychoanalysis in Japan, Korea, and China and familiarize the reader with interesting personages, quaint phrases, cultural nuances, founding of journals, and emergence of groups interested in psychoanalysis. The contributors to the book discuss the depth-psychological concepts of amae, Wa, Ajase complex, and the "filial piety complex," thus underscoring the intricate interplay of drive and ego development with the powerful forces of ancestral legacies and their attendant myths and fantasies. The reverberations of these aesthetic and relational paradigms in epic love stories, martial arts, and cinema are also elucidated. In addition, the book offers insights into the psychosocial trials and tribulations of the Western immigrant populations from these countries and their offspring. Finally, the implications of all this to the conduct of psychotherapy and psychoanalysis are addressed.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

David L. Eng
Considering the place of East Asia from both sides of the couch, this long-overdue collection provincializes psychoanalysis from the perspectives of China, Japan, and Korea. Psychoanalytic inquiry can no longer afford to ignore some of the richest East Asian cultural traditions and theories of human relations—such as Buddhism, Confucianism, filial piety, and collective dependence—and those who embody them, 'over there' as well as 'over here.'
American Psychological Association, May 12, 2010 - Shereen Abdel Kader
Freud and the Far East: Psychoanalytic Perspectives on the People and Culture of China, Japan and Korea is enlightening, insightful, and relevant for a wide range of readers, and it has the potential to deeply change our stereotypes about clinical practices—not only in the Far East but across other diverse cultures around the world....Akhtar and his colleagues have greatly enhanced the richness of psychoanalytical theory and practice by linking psychoanalysis with its Eastern influences....I strongly recommend including this book on the reading lists of clinical and abnormal psychology courses because of its strong focus on cultural diversity.
Francis Lu
Salman Akhtar has edited a marvelous and thought-provoking exploration of psychoanalysis in the cultural context of China, Japan, and Korea. Unlike any other book, Freud and the Far East shows us the similarities and differences in psychoanalytic theory and clinical work between these three Asian countries. Building upon earlier edited books on psychoanalysis and India and Islam, Akhtar succeeds in illuminating not only how psychoanalysis historically evolved in a non-Western region, but also how some of the fascinating and creative ideas that emerged in the process enriched the psychoanalytic tradition.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780765706935
  • Publisher: Aronson, Jason Inc.
  • Publication date: 7/28/2009
  • Pages: 338
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Salman Akhtar is professor of psychiatry at Jefferson Medical College and Training and Supervising Analyst at the Psychoanalytic Center of Philadelphia.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Introduction Part 2 Tales and Terrains Chapter 3 1. Psychoanalysis in Japan Chapter 4 2. Psychoanalysis in Korea Chapter 5 3. Psychoanalysis in China Part 6 Traditions and Transformations Chapter 7 4. Two Kinds of Guilt Feelings: The Ajase Complex Chapter 8 5. Amae: East and West Chapter 9 6. Wa: Harmony and Sustenance of the Self in Japanese Life Chapter 10 7. Psychoanalysis in the "Shame Culture" of Japan: A "Dramatic" Point of View Chapter 11 8. The Butterfly Lovers: Psychodynamic Reflections on the Ancient Chinese Love Story, Liang-Zhu Chapter 12 9. The Filial Piety Complex: Variations on the Oedipus Theme in Chinese Literature and Culture Chapter 13 10. Transformation of Korean Women: From Tradition to Modernity Chapter 14 11. The Food Sex Equation: Three Sizzling Movies from the Far East Chapter 15 12. Zen, Martial Arts, and Psychoanalysis in Training the Mind of the Psychotherapist Part 16 Transpositions and Techniques Chapter 17 13. The Chinese-American Family Chapter 18 14. Second Generation Korean-Americans Chapter 19 15. An American-Japanese Transcultural Psychoanalysis and the Issue of Teacher Transference Chapter 20 16. Naikan: A Buddhist Self-Reflective Approach Chapter 21 17. Psychoanalytic Therapy Across Civilizations: Asians and Asian-Americans

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 4 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(2)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 2, 2014

    Bn & nightpaw

    Blacknight: *pads in watching nightpaw* Nightpaw: *pads in* Did you want to talk dad? He asks. How did you know? Asks blacknight. Just an instinct. Shrugs nightpaw. Well..... kinda. Answers bn half heartedly. The kits? Yea.......did u know? Yea...i could tell from ur expression. Oh...thats good.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 2, 2014

    Bf

    Lol not this again. Ur such a piece of shirt when it gets to this xP

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 11, 2010

    Interesting but...

    The book editor is pretty creative to put together the materials from several Asian cultures (Chinese, Japanese, and Korean) and Freudianism together. Apparently, there has been a trend in psychoanalytic field to expand their market and territory to China (who wouldn't want to earn more money there these days?). Unfortunately, here among the authors who wrote about Chinese, the two who reported about psychoanalysis in China as well as the status of Chinese American pursuing psychoanalysis in the US are apparently not Chinese and know little about it. To begin with, what the Chapter authors wrote about Chinese from The Mainland China not having opportunity to study psychoanalysis in the US is absolutely false - Chinese like all other foreign scholars who are in the US have the opportunity to go to schools again or get in psychiatry residency training after passing graduate medical exams; from there, there are good opportunities to study psychoanalysis as they wish. Thus, the opportunity isn't an issue as it says in that book chapter. The critical issue here is not only Chinese immigrants but also American born Chinese physicians or psychologists have little interest in studying psychoanalysis as a profession and few get involved in the field. Part of the reason is that it's not practical in the society anymore from cost and benefit point of view. But nobody seems to really care if other reasons among them. Secondly, the authors of that particular chapter disregarded a serious debate in their field on safety issue (and potential ethics) of practicing psychoanalysis in China using Skype. The debate was reflected in two issues of The American Psychoanalysts in 2008 (Vol. 42) [see American Psychoanalytic Asso. publication on the web]). One side of the debate basically has concerns for Chinese government censorship over internet, including through Skype program, just as the Skype company admitted itself that its technology is not completely infallible ([...]). Interestingly, those who insist on pursuing the practice (CAPA), including that chapter authors vowed for Skype safety much more strongly than Skype company itself. ... Another big shortcoming of this book is that it omits HongKong Chinese and Taiwan Chinese, not to mention Singaporean Chinese that consists its over 80% population, as if only The Mainland China has Chinese and only those Chinese has psychology that's worth mentioning. Little do they know that Chinese traditions are far better preserved in Taiwan and Hong Kong than those in The Mainland. Therefore, in terms of Chinese culture and psychology, there is a big hole in this book.

    However, overall, it's an interesting read from anthropology and psychology point of view. It is intellectually stimulating. I hope that the editor will be more careful with regard to publishing materials from other authors - check evidence instead of one's claimed title.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 6, 2010

    An interesting book but...

    The book editor is pretty creative to put together the materials from several Asian cultures (Chinese, Japanese, and Korean) and Freudianism together. Apparently, there has been a trend in psychoanalytic field to expand their market and territory to China (who wouldn't want to earn more money there these days?). Unfortunately, here among the authors who wrote about Chinese, the two who reported about psychoanalysis in China as well as the status of Chinese American pursuing psychoanalysis in the US are apparently not Chinese and know little about it. To begin with, what the Chapter authors wrote about Chinese from The Mainland China not having opportunity to study psychoanalysis in the US is absolutely false - Chinese like all other foreign scholars who are in the US have the opportunity to go to schools again or get in psychiatry residency training after passing graduate medical exams; from there, there are good opportunities to study psychoanalysis as they wish. Thus, the opportunity isn't an issue as it says in that book chapter. The critical issue here is not only Chinese immigrants but also American born Chinese physicians or psychologists have little interest in studying psychoanalysis as a profession and few got involved in the field. Part of the reason is that it's not practical in the society anymore from cost and benefit point of view. But nobody seems to really care if other reasons among them. Secondly, the authors of that particular chapter disregarded a serious debate in their field on safety issue (and potential ethics) of practicing psychoanalysis in China using Skype. The debate was reflected in two issues of The American Psychoanalysts in 2008 (Vol. 42) [http://www.apsa.org/Publications/The_American_Psychoanalyst.aspx]). One side of the debate basically have concerns for Chinese government censorship over internet, including Skype, just as the Skype company admitted itself that its technology is not completely infallible (http://www.betanews.com/article/Skype-admits-security-breach-in-China/1223053868). Interestingly, those who insist on pursuing the practice (CAPA), including that chapter authors vowed for Skype safety much more strongly than Skype company itself. ... Another big shortcoming of this book is that it omits HongKong Chinese and Taiwan Chinese, not to mention Singaporean Chinese that consists its over 80% population, as if only The Mainland China has Chinese and only those Chinese has psychology that's worth mentioning. Little do they know that Chinese traditions are far better preserved in Taiwan and Hong Kong than those in The Mainland. Therefore, in terms of Chinese culture and psychology, there is a big hole in the book.

    However, overall, it's an interesting read from anthropology and psychology point of view. It is intellectually stimulating. I hope that the editor will be more careful with regard to publishing materials from other authors - check evidence instead of one's claimed title.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)