Freud by Zweig

Freud by Zweig

by Stefan Zweig
     
 
Stefan Zweig (1881-1942) first wrote about Sigmund Freud (1856-1939) as part of Mental Healers (available as an eBook from Plunkett Lake Press). Published in Germany in February of 1931, it is one of the earliest studies of Freud's work by a writer outside the psychoanalytic community and is a fresh reminder of the excitement that Freud's revolutionary approach to the

Overview

Stefan Zweig (1881-1942) first wrote about Sigmund Freud (1856-1939) as part of Mental Healers (available as an eBook from Plunkett Lake Press). Published in Germany in February of 1931, it is one of the earliest studies of Freud's work by a writer outside the psychoanalytic community and is a fresh reminder of the excitement that Freud's revolutionary approach to the psyche engendered in Zweig and his contemporaries.

Zweig had been sending his writing to Freud for feedback since the first decade of the twentieth century. Reading about himself was an ambivalent experience for Freud. In his letter of response to this essay, Freud wrote: "I could object that you overemphasize the element of petit-bourgeois rectitude in me -- the fellow is a little more complicated than that!" but "I am probably not wrong in assuming that you were a stranger to psychoanalytical theory prior to the writing of this book. It is all the more to your credit, therefore, that you have absorbed so much of it since."

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940014046640
Publisher:
Plunkett Lake Press
Publication date:
02/08/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
376 KB

Meet the Author

Stefan Zweig (1881-1942) was the most widely read German-language author of the twentieth century. Zweig was a secular Jew, a Pan-European and a pacifist. He was born in Vienna on November 28, 1881 and studied there and in Berlin. As a young man, he translated French poetry by Verlaine, Baudelaire, and Verhaeren into German. He quickly branched out into journalism, fiction, biography and writing for the theater. His plays, including the anti-war Jeremiah, were produced throughout Europe. His books were eventually translated into over 50 languages. Today, he is best known for his many works of non-fiction. They include the classic memoir The World of Yesterday and many biographical essays on famous writers and thinkers such as Erasmus, Tolstoy, Nietzsche, Dostoyevsky, Dickens, Freud and Mesmer. He lived in Salzburg with his first wife Friderike until 1933, when his books were burned by the Nazis. In 1934, he emigrated to England where he continued writing and met his second wife Lotte Altmann. In 1941, the couple moved to Brazil where they committed suicide in 1942.

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