Freud, the Reluctant Philosopher

Freud, the Reluctant Philosopher

0.0 0
by Alfred I. Tauber
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Freud began university intending to study both medicine and philosophy. But he was ambivalent about philosophy, regarding it as metaphysical, too limited to the conscious mind, and ignorant of empirical knowledge. Yet his private correspondence and his writings on culture and history reveal that he never forsook his original philosophical ambitions. Indeed, while

See more details below

Overview

Freud began university intending to study both medicine and philosophy. But he was ambivalent about philosophy, regarding it as metaphysical, too limited to the conscious mind, and ignorant of empirical knowledge. Yet his private correspondence and his writings on culture and history reveal that he never forsook his original philosophical ambitions. Indeed, while Freud remained firmly committed to positivist ideals, his thought was permeated with other aspects of German philosophy. Placed in dialogue with his intellectual contemporaries, Freud appears as a reluctant philosopher who failed to recognize his own metaphysical commitments, thereby crippling the defense of his theory and misrepresenting his true achievement. Recasting Freud as an inspired humanist and reconceiving psychoanalysis as a form of moral inquiry, Alfred Tauber argues that Freudianism still offers a rich approach to self-inquiry, one that reaffirms the enduring task of philosophy and many of the abiding ethical values of Western civilization.

Read More

Editorial Reviews

New Statesman
Tauber's patient exposition of Freud's suppressed philosophical heritage becomes a tour de force when he turns back beyond Schopenhauer to Kant.
— Lesley Chamberlain
Choice
The main focus is Freud as an ethical and social thinker who, while drawing on multiple sources of classical humanism, prepares the way for a new humanism informed by the insights of psychoanalysis. Tauber offers important chapters devoted to the intellectual ferment of 19th-century German philosophy and its influence on Freud.
PsycCRITIQUES
Tauber provides a scholarly exposition, and the book is helpful for appreciating the diverse background influences on Freud's thinking. Furthermore, Tauber also clearly has an exhaustive knowledge of Freud's writing and is well read with respect to contemporary philosophically oriented psychoanalytic writers.
— Simon Boag
Scandinavian Psychoanalytic Review
I feel a great deal of sympathy towards Tauber's project, and his analysis is rich, interesting and engaged.
— Johan Eriksson
Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association
[A] tour de force.
— Elisabeth Young-Breuhl
British Journal for the History of Science
This is an attractively written and deeply illuminating study of Freud as moral philosopher. . . . This book goes a long way to explain the positive side of the continued interest and, indeed, to explain why Freud will continue to fascinate, leaving far behind by-now stale debate about whether or not he created a science.
— Roger Smith
New Statesman - Lesley Chamberlain
Tauber's patient exposition of Freud's suppressed philosophical heritage becomes a tour de force when he turns back beyond Schopenhauer to Kant.
PsycCRITIQUES - Simon Boag
Tauber provides a scholarly exposition, and the book is helpful for appreciating the diverse background influences on Freud's thinking. Furthermore, Tauber also clearly has an exhaustive knowledge of Freud's writing and is well read with respect to contemporary philosophically oriented psychoanalytic writers.
Scandinavian Psychoanalytic Review - Johan Eriksson
I feel a great deal of sympathy towards Tauber's project, and his analysis is rich, interesting and engaged.
Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association - Elisabeth Young-Breuhl
[A] tour de force.
British Journal for the History of Science - Roger Smith
This is an attractively written and deeply illuminating study of Freud as moral philosopher. . . . This book goes a long way to explain the positive side of the continued interest and, indeed, to explain why Freud will continue to fascinate, leaving far behind by-now stale debate about whether or not he created a science.
From the Publisher
"Tauber's patient exposition of Freud's suppressed philosophical heritage becomes a tour de force when he turns back beyond Schopenhauer to Kant."—Lesley Chamberlain, New Statesman

"The main focus is Freud as an ethical and social thinker who, while drawing on multiple sources of classical humanism, prepares the way for a new humanism informed by the insights of psychoanalysis. Tauber offers important chapters devoted to the intellectual ferment of 19th-century German philosophy and its influence on Freud."Choice

"Tauber provides a scholarly exposition, and the book is helpful for appreciating the diverse background influences on Freud's thinking. Furthermore, Tauber also clearly has an exhaustive knowledge of Freud's writing and is well read with respect to contemporary philosophically oriented psychoanalytic writers."—Simon Boag, PsycCRITIQUES

"I feel a great deal of sympathy towards Tauber's project, and his analysis is rich, interesting and engaged."—Johan Eriksson, Scandinavian Psychoanalytic Review

"[A] tour de force."—Elisabeth Young-Breuhl, Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association

"This is an attractively written and deeply illuminating study of Freud as moral philosopher. . . . This book goes a long way to explain the positive side of the continued interest and, indeed, to explain why Freud will continue to fascinate, leaving far behind by-now stale debate about whether or not he created a science."—Roger Smith, British Journal for the History of Science

"Freud, the Reluctant Philosopher is an erudite, thoughtful and challenging book, which amply repays the investment of working through it."—Daphna Erdinast-Vulcan, European Legacy

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781400836925
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Publication date:
07/01/2010
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
344
File size:
1 MB

What People are saying about this

Jennifer Radden
To his enormous credit, Tauber avoids the selective approach that is almost always taken by philosophers studying Freud. Instead of isolating facets of this multifaceted thinker, Tauber has striven to give an integrated and holistic portrait. He also provides a careful and detailed account of Freud's debt to German thinkers close to his own time. This is an important contribution.
Jennifer Radden, University of Massachusetts, Boston
Gilman
Rarely does a book cause one to rethink an entire field. Alfred Tauber's detailed and accessible study of the philosophical underpinnings and implications of Freud's work (and psychoanalysis in general) will have this impact on both the humanities and psychoanalysis. Tauber's rigorous framing of Freudian thought in the context of the history of philosophy (and the history of science) makes this the most important book on the shape of Freud's thought in recent times.
Sander L. Gilman, Emory University

Read More

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >