Freud's Models of the Mind: An Introduction

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Overview

The authors succeed in putting Freud's models of the mind into a historical and developmental framework and show the complexity of his thinking on the relationship between the conscious and unconscious mind.

The book contains black-and-white illustrations.

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Editorial Reviews

Mary I. Daly
This compilation of lectures on Freud's model of the mind was written by a group of clinician-scholars from the Institute of Psychiatry at the University of London. Originally the lectures were given by the authors in the 1970s and published as articles in the British Journal of Psychiatry in the late 1970s. As the book developed, the authors worked together to add later material on recent developments in psychoanalytic theory. The manuscript includes an overview of Freud's theory and depicts three major developments in his thinking; sections expand on these frames of reference (the affect-trauma frame of reference, the topographical frame of reference, and the structural frame of reference). The purpose of the book is to outline Freud's theory and document the roots and development of his ideas over his lifetime. It provides a theoretical foundation for students and clinicians as they seek to understand the great variety of psychoanalytic theories that have emerged since Freud. The authors' in-depth grasp of Freud's thinking and his historical milieu, combined with their clear and concise writing style, make the material accessible and interesting. The discussion is targeted at students of psychoanalysis as well as clinicians. Students will appreciate the helpful introduction to Freud's models of the mind and the authors' explanation of the uses and limitations of each model for Freud. Advanced clinicians will appreciate the exploration of the factors which shaped Freud's development (e.g. the interplay between observed clinical phenomena, Freud's theories, and the scientific worldview of the late nineteenth century). Readers will easily locate sections on theaffect-trauma, topographical, and structural models. The index is detailed and helpful for locating key terms and their meanings at different points in Freud's work. Teachers will appreciate the structure using "frames of reference" and clear illustrations of each model. This book is exceptionally clear and concise. It also provides a rich overview of Freud's ideas with insights into the development of his thinking over time. As teachers, the authors anticipated the need for sequencing the material and describing the forces that stimulated the emergence of Freud's topographical and structural models after the initial affect-trauma frame of reference. Thus, the book functions both as an introduction to Freud's ideas and as a reference for more advanced clinicians seeking to link current psychoanalytic discussion with early theory. Libraries, students, and teaching clinicians should own a copy of this book.
Booknews
This schematization of Freud's theories describes the development of three frames of reference: the affect-trauma, the topographical, and the structural. It is designed for use by those who teach psychoanalytic theory. The authors intend to present Freud's work as systematically as possible, noting the emendations the thinker made to his theory throughout his life. Topics include narcissism and object- love, transference, and dream processes. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Mary I. Daly, PsyD (Rush University Medical Center)
Description: This compilation of lectures on Freud's model of the mind was written by a group of clinician-scholars from the Institute of Psychiatry at the University of London. Originally the lectures were given by the authors in the 1970s and published as articles in the British Journal of Psychiatry in the late 1970s. As the book developed, the authors worked together to add later material on recent developments in psychoanalytic theory. The manuscript includes an overview of Freud's theory and depicts three major developments in his thinking; sections expand on these frames of reference (the affect-trauma frame of reference, the topographical frame of reference, and the structural frame of reference).
Purpose: The purpose of the book is to outline Freud's theory and document the roots and development of his ideas over his lifetime. It provides a theoretical foundation for students and clinicians as they seek to understand the great variety of psychoanalytic theories that have emerged since Freud. The authors' in-depth grasp of Freud's thinking and his historical milieu, combined with their clear and concise writing style, make the material accessible and interesting.
Audience: The discussion is targeted at students of psychoanalysis as well as clinicians. Students will appreciate the helpful introduction to Freud's models of the mind and the authors' explanation of the uses and limitations of each model for Freud. Advanced clinicians will appreciate the exploration of the factors which shaped Freud's development (e.g. the interplay between observed clinical phenomena, Freud's theories, and the scientific worldview of the late nineteenth century).
Features: Readers will easily locate sections on the affect-trauma, topographical, and structural models. The index is detailed and helpful for locating key terms and their meanings at different points in Freud's work. Teachers will appreciate the structure using "frames of reference" and clear illustrations of each model.
Assessment: This book is exceptionally clear and concise. It also provides a rich overview of Freud's ideas with insights into the development of his thinking over time. As teachers, the authors anticipated the need for sequencing the material and describing the forces that stimulated the emergence of Freud's topographical and structural models after the initial affect-trauma frame of reference. Thus, the book functions both as an introduction to Freud's ideas and as a reference for more advanced clinicians seeking to link current psychoanalytic discussion with early theory. Libraries, students, and teaching clinicians should own a copy of this book.

3 Stars from Doody
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781855751675
  • Publisher: Karnac Books
  • Publication date: 5/28/1997
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 224
  • Product dimensions: 5.70 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Joseph Sandler qualified as a psychoanalyst in the British Psychoanalytical Society. He was the Freud Memorial Professor of Psychoanalysis in the University of London and Director of the Psychoanalysis Unit at University College London, and in private practice in London. He was formerly the first Sigmund Freud Professor of Psychoanalysis at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Editor of the International Journal of Psychoanalysis and the International Review of Psychoanalysis, and was President of the International Psychoanalytical Association.

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Table of Contents

Preface
Foreword
Introduction 1
I Foundations
1 The development of Freud's theory 11
2 Basic assumptions 30
II First Phase: The Affect-Trauma Frame of Reference
3 The affect-trauma model 41
III Second Phase: The Topographical Frame of Reference
4 The organization of the mental apparatus 57
5 The system Unconscious 72
6 The system Preconscious 82
7 The system Conscious 96
8 Transference 101
9 Dream processes 116
IV Further Aspects
10 Narcissism and object-love 141
11 Limitations and transition to the structural model 153
V Third Phase: The Structural Frame of Reference
12 Characteristics 165
13 The three agencies 172
A final word 185
References 187
Index 193
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