Friday's Child

Friday's Child

4.0 29
by Georgette Heyer
     
 

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"A lightsome, brightsome comedy." -Kirkus Reviews

"Nimble, light-hearted chronicle of high London society in the time of the Regency." -The New Yorker

Celebrate the 80th birthday of Regency Romance with great books from Sourcebooks Casablanca!

Georgette Heyer's sparkling romances have charmed and delighted millions of readers. Her

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Overview

"A lightsome, brightsome comedy." -Kirkus Reviews

"Nimble, light-hearted chronicle of high London society in the time of the Regency." -The New Yorker

Celebrate the 80th birthday of Regency Romance with great books from Sourcebooks Casablanca!

Georgette Heyer's sparkling romances have charmed and delighted millions of readers. Her characters brilliantly illuminate one of the most exciting and fascinating eras of English history-when drawing rooms sparkled with well-dressed nobility and romantic intrigues ruled the day. Heyer's heroines are smart and independent; her heroes are dashing noblemen who know how to handle a horse, fight a duel, or address a lady. And her sense of humor is legendary.

When the incomparable Miss Milbourne spurns the impetuous Lord Sherington's marriage proposal (she laughs at him-laughs!) he vows to marry the next female he encounters, who happens to be the young, penniless Miss Hero Wantage, who has adored him all her life. Whisking her off to London, Sherry discovers there is no end to the scrapes his young, green bride can get into, and she discovers the excitement and glamorous social scene of the ton. Not until a deep misunderstanding erupts and Sherry almost loses his bride, does he plumb the depths of his own heart, and surprises himself with the love he finds there.

"Reading Georgette Heyer is the next best thing to reading Jane Austen." -Publishers Weekly

Georgette Heyer (1902?1974) wrote over fifty novels, including Regency romances, mysteries, and historical fiction. She was known as the Queen of Regency romance, and was legendary for her research, historical accuracy, and her extraordinary plots and characterizations.

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Editorial Reviews

Brothers Judd
This is Jane Austen as presented on the Carol Burnett show and it's more fun than a bag of cats.
— Orin Judd
Ramblings on Romance
Friday's Child is a wonderful tale of regency England by master storyteller, Georgette Heyer... If you are in a mood for great comedy and endearing characters, Friday's Child is the book for you!
— Kate Garrrabant
Good Clean Reads
The characters are interesting, likable, and believable and the dialogue between them is a high point of the book. I recommend Friday's Child to anyone who wishes that Jane Austen had written more books.
— Kim Izzat
Book Binge
I really enjoyed Friday's Child and can't wait to delve into my next GH novel.
— Ames
A Book Blogger's Diary
Sparkling with wit, filled to the brim with wonderfully developed characters and with Heyer's expert eye capturing the atmosphere with great accuracy, the book is a must-read for anyone who reads, period!
— Rashmi Srinivas
Book Loons
I cannot count the number of times I have read and re-read Friday's Child; and each re-reading is still a joy. So vivid are the characters, so real the world Heyer recreates that a return visit never fails to entertain.
— Hilary Williamson
Queue My Review
It would, I think, be difficult to read this book without a smile on your face. The antics of the happy couple and their supporters and detractors seem delightfully silly compared with most romance fare today. If you are in need of a few hours of escape, I heartily recommend "Friday's Child" by Georgette Heyer.
— Julie
Blog Critics
Friday's Child is a cut above the rest, which is saying quite a lot since this is Georgette Heyer we're talking about and all her books happen to be fantastic. Friday's Child is filled with likable characters that stick with you and witty dialogue that will make you laugh out loud.
— Katie Trattner
From the Publisher
"It would, I think, be difficult to read this book without a smile on your face. The antics of the happy couple and their supporters and detractors seem delightfully silly compared with most romance fare today. If you are in need of a few hours of escape, I heartily recommend "Friday's Child" by Georgette Heyer." - Queue My Review

"Friday's Child is a cut above the rest, which is saying quite a lot since this is Georgette Heyer we're talking about and all her books happen to be fantastic. Friday's Child is filled with likable characters that stick with you and witty dialogue that will make you laugh out loud." - Blog Critics

"Sparkling with wit, filled to the brim with wonderfully developed characters and with Heyer's expert eye capturing the atmosphere with great accuracy, the book is a must-read for anyone who reads, period!" - A Book Blogger's Diary

"I cannot count the number of times I have read and re-read Friday's Child; and each re-reading is still a joy. So vivid are the characters, so real the world Heyer recreates that a return visit never fails to entertain." - Book Loons

"The characters are interesting, likable, and believable and the dialogue between them is a high point of the book. I recommend Friday's Child to anyone who wishes that Jane Austen had written more books." - Good Clean Reads

"I really enjoyed Friday's Child and can't wait to delve into my next GH novel." - Book Binge

"Friday's Child is a wonderful tale of regency England by master storyteller, Georgette Heyer... If you are in a mood for great comedy and endearing characters, Friday's Child is the book for you!" - Ramblings on Romance

"This is Jane Austen as presented on the Carol Burnett show and it's more fun than a bag of cats." - Brothers Judd

"Georgette Heyer was one of the great protagonists of the historical novel in the post-war golden age of the form. Her regency romances are delightful light reading, and her historical novels such as The Spanish Bride and An Infamous Army demonstrate how fiction and history can work together to make a valuable literary form.
" - Philippa Gregory

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781402233746
Publisher:
Sourcebooks
Publication date:
04/01/2008
Series:
Regency Romances , #6
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
432
Sales rank:
68,616
File size:
1 MB

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Read an Excerpt

Excerpt from Chapter 1

Do not, I beg of you, my lord, say more!' uttered Miss Milborne, in imploring accents, slightly averting her lovely countenance, and clasping both hands at her bosom.

Her companion, a tall young gentleman who had gone romantically down upon one knee before her chair, appeared put out by this faltered request. 'Damn it - I mean, dash it, Isabella!' he expostulated, correcting himself somewhat impa¬tiently as the lady turned reproachful brown eyes upon him, 'I haven't started!'

'Do not!'
'But I'm about to offer for you!' said the Viscount, with more than a touch of asperity.
'I know,' replied the lady.'It is useless! Say no more, my lord!'

The Viscount arose from his knee, much chagrined. 'I must say, Isabella, I think you might let a fellow speak!' he said crossly.

'I would spare you pain, my lord.'
'I wish you will stop talking in that damned theatrical way!' said the Viscount. 'And don't keep on calling me "my lord", as though you hadn't known me all your life!'

Miss Milborne flushed, and stiffened a little. It was perfectly true, since their estates marched together, that she had known the Viscount all her life, but a dazzling career as an acknowl¬edged Beauty, with half the eligible young gentlemen in town at her feet, had accustomed her to a far more reverential mode of address than that favoured by her childhood's playmate. In some dudgeon, she gazed coldly out of the window, while her suitor took a few hasty turns about the room.

The prospect, which was of neat lawns, well-stocked flower-beds, and trim hedges, was a pleasing one, but it was not from any love of sylvan settings that Miss Milborne was at present sojourning in the country. Her withdrawal from the Metropolis some weeks previously had been in consequence of her having contracted an odiously childish complaint which had made it necessary for her to disappear from the Polite World at a moment when she might have been pardoned for considering herself, if not its hub, at least its cynosure. Her Mama, quite as sensible as herself of the ridiculous nature of her indisposition, had announced her to be quite worn-down by the exigencies of fashionable life, and had whisked her off to Kent in a post-chaise-and-four, where, in a comfortable mansion suitably retired from the haunts of men, she was able not only to recover her health and looks in seclusion, but also to communicate her complaint to two abigails, and a youthful page-boy. She had emerged from her sick room some weeks earlier, but since she was still a trifle pale and out of looks, Mrs Milborne, a lady distinguished by her admirable sense, had decided to keep her in the country until (she said) the roses should again bloom in her cheeks. Quite a number of ardent gentlemen had presented themselves at Milborne House, having driven all the way from London in the hopes of being permitted a glimpse of the Incomparable, but the door remained shut against them, and they were obliged to relinquish their nosegays and passionate billets into the hands of an unresponsive butler, and to tool their various chariots back to town without having had even the refreshment of being allowed to press their lips to the fair hand of the Beauty.

Lord Sheringham would undoubtedly have met with the same reception had he not presumed in a very unhandsome way upon his long acquaintance with the family, by riding over from Sheringham Place, where he had been spending the night, leaving his horse at the stables, and walking up through the gardens to enter the house through one of the long windows that opened on to the lawn. Encountering an astonished footman, his lordship, very much at home, had tossed his whip and his gloves on to a table, laid his curly-brimmed beaver beside them, and demanded the master of the house.

Mr. Milborne, being quite unblessed by the worldly wisdom which characterised his spouse, had no sooner grasped the purpose of this visit than he suggested vaguely, and not very hopefully, that his lordship had better speak to Isabella himself. 'For I'm sure I don't know, Anthony,' he had said, looking doubtfully at the Viscount. 'There's no saying what may be in their heads, no saying at all!'

Correctly divining this cryptic utterance to refer to his wife and daughter, his lordship had said: 'At all events, you've no objection, sir, have you?'

'No,' replied Mr. Milborne. 'That is - Well, no, I suppose I don't object. But you had best see Isabella for yourself !'

So the Viscount was ushered into the Beauty's presence before she had time even to draw down the blind against the too-searching light of day, and had plunged without the slightest preamble into the first offer of marriage he had ever made.

Miss Milborne found herself in the unhappy predicament of not knowing her own mind. The Viscount had been one of her acknowledged suitors for the past year, and the fact of her having known him almost from the cradle did not blind her to his charms. He was a handsome young blade, wild enough to intrigue the female fancy, and if not as brilliant a match as the Duke of Severn, who had lately shown flattering symptoms of being on the verge of declaring himself, at least he was much more presentable - his grace being a stolid young man inclined to corpulency. On the other hand, the Viscount was by no means so devout a lover as his friend Lord Wrotham, who had several times offered to blow his brains out, if such a violent act would afford her pleasure. In fact, the suspicion had more than once crossed Miss Milborne's mind that the Viscount had joined the throng of her admirers for no better reason than that he was never one to be out of the mode. His professed adoration had not so far led him to abandon the pursuit of opera-dancers and Cyprians, or to rectify those faults of character to which Miss Milborne had more than once taken exception. She was a little piqued by him. If he would but display a few tangible signs of his devotion, such as reforming his way of life, which was shocking; growing slightly haggard, like poor Wrotham; turning pale at a snub; or being cast into rapture by a smile, she thought she would have been much inclined to accept his proffered suit. But instead of behaving in a fashion which she had come to regard as her due, the Viscount continued on his reprehensible course, according her certainly a good deal of homage, but apparently deriving just as much pleasure as ever from a set of sports and pastimes which seemed to have been chosen by him with a view to causing his family the maximum amount of pain and anxiety.

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Meet the Author

The late Georgette Heyer was a very private woman. Her historical novels have charmed and delighted millions of readers for decades, though she rarely reached out to the public to discuss her works or private life. It is known that she was born in Wimbledon in August 1902, and her first novel, The Black Moth, was published in 1921.

Heyer published 56 books over the next 53 years, until her death from lung cancer in 1974. Heyer's large volume of works included Regency romances, mysteries and historical fiction. Known also as the Queen of Regency romance, Heyer was legendary for her research, historical accuracy and her extraordinary plots and characterizations. Her last book, My Lord John, was published posthumously in 1975. She was married to George Ronald Rougier, a mining engineer, and they had one son together, Richard.
Georgette Heyer's novels have charmed and delighted millions of readers for decades. English Heritage has awarded Georgette Heyer one of their prestigious Blue Plaques, designating her Wimbledon home as the residence of an important figure in British history. She was born in Wimbledon in August 1902. She wrote her first novel, The Black Moth, at the age of seventeen to amuse her convalescent brother; it was published in 1921 and became an instant success.

Heyer published 56 books over the next 53 years, until her death from lung cancer in 1974. Her last book, My Lord John, was published posthumously in 1975. A very private woman, she rarely reached out to the public to discuss her works or personal life. Her work included Regency romances, mysteries and historical fiction. Known as the Queen of Regency romance, Heyer was legendary for her research, historical accuracy and her extraordinary plots and characterizations. She was married to George Ronald Rougier, a barrister, and they had one son, Richard.

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Friday's Child 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 29 reviews.
Laurel_Ann More than 1 year ago
Spendthrift Anthony Verelst, Viscount Sheringham doesn't give a fig about his finances until his creditors do. Selfish, impetuous and deeply in debt, he is unable to access his inheritance until he reaches 25 or marries and sets out to acquire a wife proposing to his neighbor and lifelong friend Isabella Milborne, an 'Incomparable', whose beauty and elegance are renown. She doesn't think much of the idea or of Lord Sheringham's dissipated lifestyle and rebuffs the offer. Indignant, he swears to marry the next girl he sees who happens to be seventeen year old Hero Wantage, the neighborhood orphan Cinderella living with cousins who want to farm her out to be a governess. By no means a scholar, Hero is miffed by the work plan just wanting to have a bit of fun and enjoy the charms of society in London. Seizing the opportunity, Hero accepts Sherry's proposal and they run away to London to be married. It is here we are introduced to the real heart of the story, Sherry's three male friends: his two cousins the steady Gilbert (Gil) Ringwood and the foppish Hon. Ferdinand (Ferdy) Fakenham, and his hot headed friend George, Lord Wrotham who form sort of a bumbling bachelors club of Regency society dandies. Their influence drives the story as they help Hero (nicknamed Kitten) unschooled in the nuances of social etiquette and a bit lacking in common sense out of all sorts of scrapes that threaten her reputation and infuriate her husband who in turn is as equally clueless about his own responsibilities as a newly married man.

Heyer gives us a delightful view of Regency era London with its social outlets for the rich: fashion, dancing, parties, gambling, romantic intrigues, and the gambit of other frivolous extravagances that entertain the high society 'ton' world. Her characters are each distinctive in personality and well drawn out. The three bachelor friends were especially enjoyable as their priceless dialogue humorously captures that uniquely British drawing room chatter of "I dare says" and "dash it alls" that at times from other authors seems trite, but in this case just lifted the colloquial credibility and ambience. Even though this novel was written over sixty years ago, it is surprisingly superior in style and creativity to many being produced today. Friday's Child reads like an expertly paced stage play, and I felt the influence of Heyer's contemporaries in playwrights Noel Coward and George Bernard Shaw in the satirical social commentary and humorous biting dialogues. There were a few holes in the plot such as Sherry's concerns over his uncle's abuse of the trusteeship of his estate not materializing or Hero's continual naïveté among others, but they were very minor and did not spoil my enjoyment. The gradual maturity and transition by both protagonists gave for a rewarding end. It is easy to see why so many Jane Austen fans adore Georgette Heyer as they share in the sisterhood of the 'Gentle Reprove Society' of comedic social satire. Friday's Child matched it's namesake from the old nursery rhyme as loving and giving, and critics marginalizing Heyer's works as mere romances take heed. Like Austen's novels, this is so much more than Chicklit.

Laurel Ann, Austenprose
Guest More than 1 year ago
I saw this copy in my local store and was so excited that I jumped up and down .For years I have been trying to locate her books in both my local libary and I found one or two but the few I read I found dull .Now finally their bringing her books to a new generation of Regency Readers like me.I'm a big fan of Regency novels Jane Austen natuarlly is my all time favorite and modern authors like Samantha James and Stepnanie Laurens but Georgette Heyer I'm not to familiar with so now that her books have been republished I'll read all the titles that I've seen.To the publisher I say a big thank you for bringing back Georgette Heyer to a new generation of readers.My mother loved her books when she was young so she'll proably read all the titles as well.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
after finding this book at my local library , it is my favorite book of hers.delightful...this book got me hooked on modern day regency writers.within a few years i bought most of them.i have over 15 of her books.her ' my lord john' is also wonderful.
britcat2 More than 1 year ago
One of my favorite Georgette Heyer books. As well as an attractive main couple, good creation of various friends and secondary romance. Amusing and enjoyable read.
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Love this heroine, and the guy's not bad either. More humor than some of her books. Does not get bogged down in side stories, but has interesting secondary characters.
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