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Friday's Daughter
     

Friday's Daughter

4.0 6
by Patricia Sprinkle
 

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A contemporary novel of sisterhood, the South, and matters of the heart.

Teensie MacAllester's two elder sisters consider her an insignificant appendage to their illustrious family. For fifteen years they have been delighted to let her care for their ailing relatives. After all, Teensie is both a nurse and a Friday's child, naturally loving and giving.

Overview

A contemporary novel of sisterhood, the South, and matters of the heart.

Teensie MacAllester's two elder sisters consider her an insignificant appendage to their illustrious family. For fifteen years they have been delighted to let her care for their ailing relatives. After all, Teensie is both a nurse and a Friday's child, naturally loving and giving.

As Teensie deferred her life, a dream sustained her: autocratic King MacAllester promised her the bulk of his estate. But when King's will is read it divides his property equally among his daughters. Teensie's share is scarcely enough to make a new start. Her sisters have a solution: Teensie can continue to serve as the family care-giver. But Teensie is determined to claim a life of her own. Throwing off the yoke of family expectations, Teensie sets in motion some surprising changes.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Sprinkle's (Hold Up the Sky) newest comingles many of the worst qualities of Southern fiction with a cloying Cinderella story line. After nursing her father, one-time college president and state senator King MacAllester, through death, Teensie discovers that he left their ancestral home equally to all three MacAllester daughters rather than solely to her, as he'd promised, so that she might convert it into a nursing home. This bequest pleases no one, and they put the house on the market, leaving Teensie, jobless and middle-aged, caught between demanding, narrow-minded sisters who have their own ideas as to not only where she's to live her life, but how. Complicating matters is a job she takes as a home nurse for Tobias Jones, a Native American farmer suffering from hepatitis. Though Jones holds a 200-year-old grudge against the MacAllesters for stealing his people's land, he and Teensie form deep feelings for each other. They suffer the prejudices of Teensie's sisters, but unite over the care of three distant Native American relatives recently made motherless. Sprinkle writes inert prose and fails to create convincing characters. (Mar.)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780451232199
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
03/01/2011
Pages:
432
Sales rank:
901,550
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 8.10(h) x 1.00(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Patricia Sprinkle grew up in North Carolina and northern Florida, graduated from Vassar College, and spent a winter writing in the Scottish Highlands before settling in Atlanta. Although as an adult she has also lived in Chicago and Miami, her mysteries and novels reflect her love for and the strength of her Southern roots. Sprinkle is a member of Sisters in Crime and Mystery Writers of America. Contact her at patriciasprinkle@hotmail.com.

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Friday's Daughter 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Though at times you know what will probably happen in the end, you still enjoyed the main character as she is interesting and righteous, loving and giving. She is the kind of heroine you want good things to happen to and the kind you want those around her to see what we see in words. It is a love story and I wish there was more to read. Enjoy.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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harstan More than 1 year ago
Teensie MacAllester is the sole caretaker of her ailing father, a state senator and college president. Thus when he dies she is hurt that he left the family home to all of his three daughters; as Teensie felt she earned the ancestral mansion without co-owners who were never there for their dad and he promised the abode to her. Teensie was planning to convert the house into a nursing home. However, her siblings refuse; instead deciding to sell the place. Her nervy sisters also try to dictate how she should live her impoverished middle age existence. Instead though despondent and unemployed, she ignores her sibling shrews to accept a position as a home nurse to Native American farmer Tobias Jones, who suffers from hepatitis. Jones hires her even though he loathes the MacAllester clan for stealing his people's land two centuries ago. Tobias and Teensie are attracted to one another, which angers her prejudicial siblings embellishing his already doubts about any MacAllester. However, Teensie proves her worth when she helps him care for three young recently orphaned Native American relatives. This engaging southern family drama stars a woman who deferred her dreams for years to care for an autocratic father only to find in his death he betrayed her; as do her sisters who give her the option of being the family charity case care-giver or remain impoverished. Although the good, the bad and the ugly parody of Cinderella and her sisters detracts from the tale as that only accentuates the lack of MacAllester morals (except for the protagonist). Fans will enjoy the lead female's efforts to liberate herself from her annoying kin who excommunicate her when she chose to live with the enemy who also makes clear he distrusts her due to her roots. Harriet Klausner