Frindle

( 592 )

Overview

Is Nick Allen a troublemaker?
He really just likes to liven things up at school — and he's always had plenty of great ideas. When Nick learns some interesting information about how words are created, suddenly he's got the inspiration for his best plan ever...the frindle. Who says a pen has to be called a pen? Why not call it a frindle? Things begin innocently enough as Nick gets his friends to use the new word. Then other people in town start saying frindle. Soon the school is ...

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Frindle

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Overview

Is Nick Allen a troublemaker?
He really just likes to liven things up at school — and he's always had plenty of great ideas. When Nick learns some interesting information about how words are created, suddenly he's got the inspiration for his best plan ever...the frindle. Who says a pen has to be called a pen? Why not call it a frindle? Things begin innocently enough as Nick gets his friends to use the new word. Then other people in town start saying frindle. Soon the school is in an uproar, and Nick has become a local hero. His teacher wants Nick to put an end to all this nonsense, but the funny thing is frindle doesn't belong to Nick anymore. The new word is spreading across the country, and there's nothing Nick can do to stop it.

When he decides to turn his fifth grade teacher's love of the dictionary around on her, clever Nick Allen invents a new word and begins a chain of events that quickly moves beyond his control.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Trying to aggravate a tough language-arts teacher, a fifth-grade boy invents a new word for pen: "frindle." Soon, the whole country is using it. "Dictionary lovers will cotton to this mild classroom fantasy," said PW. Ages 8-12. (Feb.)
Children's Literature - Judy Silverman
Fifth grader Nicholas Allen finds out that dictionaries were actually written by people. He realizes that someone, somewhere, must have decided what certain words meant and wrote them down. But what would have happened if a different word had been chosen to represent, for instance, the instrument we write with? You know, the one with the ink in it, that you push the button and the point comes out? What if it was called a frindle? Nicholas and his friends experiment with frindle until the word has a life of its own. This story is terrific, and Nicholas' teacher, Mrs. Granger, is a dead ringer for my fifth grade teacher! One really unusual aspect of the book is that we actually find out what Nicholas is like when he's a junior in college!
School Library Journal
Gr 4-6Nicholas Allen, a sharp, creative, independent thinker starts fifth grade looking for a way to sabotage his Language Arts class. The teacher, Mrs. Granger, is a legend, and he believes her when she states that it is the people who decide what words go into the dictionary. Picking up a dropped pen triggers a brilliant idea. He coins a new word for pen-frindle. It's all for fun, but frindle catches on and Nick finds himself on the "Late Show" and "Good Morning America" explaining his new word. Readers will chuckle from beginning to end as they recognize themselves and their classrooms in the cast of characters. A remarkable teacher's belief in the power of words shines through the entire story, as does a young man's tenacity in proving his point. Outstanding and witty.Pamela K. Bomboy, Chesterfield County Public Schools, VA
School Library Journal
Gr 3-6-By Andrew Clements. Nicholas Allen likes to liven things up at Lincoln Elementary. But nobody gets away with anything in Mrs. Granger's language art class, plus she is a fanatic about the dictionary. When Nick invents a new word for a pen-frindle-the excitement grows beyond the school and town.
Kirkus Reviews
Nicholas is a bright boy who likes to make trouble at school, creatively. When he decides to torment his fifth-grade English teacher, Mrs. Granger (who is just as smart as he is), by getting everyone in the class to replace the word "pen" with "frindle," he unleashes a series of events that rapidly spins out of control.

If there's any justice in the world, Clements (Temple Cat, 1995, etc.) may have something of a classic on his hands. By turns amusing and adroit, this first novel is also utterly satisfying. The chess like sparring between the gifted Nicholas and his crafty teacher is enthralling, while Mrs. Granger is that rarest of the breed: a teacher the children fear and complain about for the school year, and love and respect forever after. With comically realistic black-and-white illustrations by Selznick (The Robot King, 1995, etc.), this is a captivating tale—one to press upon children, and one they'll be passing among themselves.

From the Publisher
"Will have readers smiling all the way through...hilarious." — The Horn Book, starred review

"A captivating tale — one to press upon children, and one they'll be passing among themselves." — Kirkus, pointered review

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780689818769
  • Publisher: Atheneum Books for Young Readers
  • Publication date: 2/1/1998
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 112
  • Sales rank: 23,248
  • Age range: 8 - 12 Years
  • Lexile: 830L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 5.30 (w) x 7.50 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Andrew Clements is the author of the enormously popular Frindle. More than 10 million copies of his books have been sold, and he has been nominated for a multitude of state awards, including two Christopher Awards and an Edgar Award. His popular works include About Average, Troublemaker, Extra Credit, Lost and Found, No Talking, Room One, Lunch Money, and more. He is also the author of the Benjamin Pratt & the Keepers of the School series. He lives with his wife in Maine and has four grown children. Visit him at AndrewClements.com.

Brian Selznick is the author and illustrator of the bestselling The Invention of Hugo Cabret, which was awarded the Caldecott Medal and was a National Book Award finalist. He is also the illustrator of many books for children, including Frindle and Lunch Money by Andrew Clements, as well as the Doll People trilogy by Ann M. Martin and Laura Godwin, and The Dinosaurs of Waterhouse Hawkins by Barbara Kerley, which was a Caldecott Honor Book. Mr. Selznick divides his time between Brooklyn, New York, and San Diego, California.

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Introduction

Discussion Topics

Describing his novel, Andrew Clements writes that Frindle "is about discovering the true nature of words, language, thought, community, learning." Take each of these ideas one at a time. How is each explored in Frindle? What do you think is the true nature of each?

The frindle is just one of Nick's great ideas. Brainstorm about ways you could improve your own school. How can you turn your ideas into action?

"Every good story," Mrs. Granger writes to Nick, "needs a bad guy, don't you think?" Do you agree? Does every good story have a villain? Can you think of any that don't?

Brian Selznick's illustrations add their own sly humor to Frindle. Discuss a few of your favorites in detail. For example, how does his first illustration, opposite the title page, help set up the novel? How do you know from his fullpage portrait of Mrs. Granger that she can't be pushed around?

Although Nick didn't know it until he turned twenty-one, his new word earned him a huge amount of money. Do you think his parents were right in setting up a trust fund for him? What do you think he might have done with the money if he could have spent it earlier? What would you do if you suddenly had a lot of money of your own?

"School," the author writes in Frindle, "was the perfect place to launch a new word." Why? What makes schools such good breeding grounds for fads? Do companies or community organizations ever use your school for promoting products or services? How?

Years after he leaves Mrs. Granger's class, Nick finds a perfect way to show her how important she was to him. What's your teacher's idea of a perfect gift from a former student?Has he or she received it yet?

Activities and Research

Create and define your own new word. Think of an object, a situation, or behavior that you think needs a single new word all its own.

When Nick decides to call a pen a frindle, he creates a new synonym for a word that has few. But many words, such as friend or attractive, already have several common synonyms. On your own or with a group, make a list of words with many synonyms. What's the largest number of synonyms you can come up with for one single word?

New inventions and ideas or changing cultural influences continually add new words to our language. With the help of your parents or another adult, assemble a list of new words or new meanings for old words that have entered common usage within the last generation. Ask them as well about common words from their own childhood that are now seldom used.

Nick makes his mark on the world even though he's just a fifth grader. Research and report to your class on other individuals who made significant contributions to literature, science, music, or other fields while still very young. If possible, bring in examples of their work.

Interview a parent or a close adult friend about the teacher who meant the most to them when they were young. Did they always admire that teacher or did they grow to respect him or her more over time? What did they learn from that teacher? How did they learn it? Have they kept up with the teacher since leaving school?

Mrs. Granger is a firm believer in improving vocabulary by studying word lists, but there are also playful ways to boost your word power. Look for board games based on words, crossword puzzles, or any books that feature word games. And, of course, reading more good books is another sure way to increase your vocabulary.

News about Nick's new word spreads fast. First within his class, then in his hometown newspaper, later on television news shows and entertainment talk shows. Track a current news story through the media. Where did you first learn about the story? Keep a record of all the media outlets — newspapers, magazines, the Internet, radio and television newscasts, or entertainment shows — that also feature the same story.

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Reading Group Guide

1. Describing his novel, Andrew Clements writes that Frindle "is about discovering the true nature of words, language, thought, community, learning." Take each of these ideas one at a time. How is each explored in Frindle? What do you think is the true nature of each?

2. The frindle is just one of Nick's great ideas. Brainstorm about ways you could improve your own school. How can you turn your ideas into action?

3. "Every good story," Mrs. Granger writes to Nick, "needs a bad guy, don't you think?" Do you agree? Does every good story have a villain? Can you think of any that don't?

4. Brian Selznick's illustrations add their own sly humor to Frindle. Discuss a few of your favorites in detail. For example, how does his first illustration, opposite the title page, help set up the novel? How do you know from his full-page portrait of Mrs. Granger that she can't be pushed around?

5. Although Nick didn't know it until he turned 21, his new word earned him a huge amount of money. Do you think his parents were right in setting up a trust fund for him? What do you think he might have done with the money if he could have spent it earlier? What would you do if you suddenly had a lot of money of your own?

6. "School," the author writes in Frindle, "was the perfect place to launch a new word." Why? What makes schools such good breeding grounds for fads? Do companies or community organizations ever use your school for promoting products or services? How?

7. Years after he leaves Mrs. Granger's class, Nick finds a perfect way to show her how important she was to him. What's your teacher's idea of a perfect gift from a former student? Has he or shereceived it yet?

Projects and Research

1. Create and define your own new word. Think of an object, a situation, or behavior that you think needs a single new word all its own.

2. When Nick decides to call a pen a frindle, he creates a new synonym for a word that has few. But many words, such as friend or attractive or ugly, already have several common synonyms. On your own or with a group, make a list of words with many synonyms. What's the largest number of synonyms you can come up with for one single word?

3. New inventions and ideas or changing cultural influences continually add new words to our language. With the help of your parents or another adult, assemble a list of new words or new meanings for old words that have entered common usage within the last generation. Ask them as well about common words from their own childhood that are now seldom used.

4. Nick makes his mark on the world even though he's just a fifth grader. Research and report to your class on other individuals who made significant contributions to literature, science, music, or other fields while still very young. If possible, bring in examples of their work.

5. Interview a parent or a close adult friend about the teacher who meant the most to them when they were young. Did they always admire that teacher or did they grow to respect him or her more over time? What did they learn from that teacher? How did they learn it? Have they kept up with the teacher since leaving school?

6. Mrs. Granger is a firm believer in improving your vocabulary by studying word lists, but there are also playful ways to boost your word power. Look for board games based on words, crossword puzzles, or any books that feature word games. And, of course, reading more good books is another sure way to increase your vocabulary.

7. News about Nick's new word spreads fast. First within his class, then in his hometown newspaper, later on television news shows and entertainment talk shows. Track a current news story through the media. Where did you first learn about the story? Keep a record of all the media outlets -- newspapers, magazines, the internet, radio and television newscasts, or entertainment shows -- that also feature the same story.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 592 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(384)

4 Star

(101)

3 Star

(46)

2 Star

(12)

1 Star

(49)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 596 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 11, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    If you haven't read it, you've made a big mistake! Read it now!

    I am 9 and in third grade. I think the word frindle was very funny. Good use of pictures throughout the story. The characters were awesome! The writing was brilliant! The book was good in that it made you want to go back and finish it!

    34 out of 38 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 15, 2009

    Terrific Book

    I read a couple of chapters a night to my son before he went to bed and we both really enjoyed it. I had my mother, a retired teacher read it and she enjoyed it enough to share it with a friend who is also a retired teacher. I have continued to purchase more Andrew Clements books for my son. This book truly proves that kids CAN make a difference.

    26 out of 29 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 18, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Great Book

    I'm a 24 year old college student who was assigned this book for one of my ELED courses and I absolutely loved it. I will definately recommend this book to my students and my own children in the future.

    22 out of 24 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 27, 2010

    A Classroom Review

    Our classroom recently read the book Frindle by Andrew Clements. Our teacher chose to read us this book because she thought it was very funny and that many of us would like it. After reading the book, we really enjoyed it. We enjoyed it because it showed us that we can make a word up and it can mean something else. It also helped us learn about other words that people make and put in the dictionary. It also showed us how studnets can get in trouble if they don't obey their teacher. We learned that Nick has a talent for creating new words and being influential. Overall, we enjoyed this book and would recommend it to other kids to read.

    15 out of 16 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 27, 2011

    This book is one of my top ten favorite books.....

    I read this book in school and i have to say, i was surprised of how detailed and funny this book actually is. Its a great read for anyone, highly recommended

    13 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 6, 2012

    Billy

    This book is asome i would read it every day

    11 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 28, 2012

    The best book ever

    My 5th grade teacher read this to my class and I. We all injoyed it. My classes favorite book that year.

    9 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 5, 2012

    ¿THE BEST BOOK¿

    A book a middle schooler should read with entertament. A fun story even an adult should read it.

    7 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 3, 2011

    You Cant Not Read It, Its Awesome

    The Best Muga Muga

    I am an 11 year old girl girl and i am in the fifth grade. If you love to read just like i do yuo will love reading a lot more if you read the book Frindle by Andrew Clements. Is Nick allen really a troublemaker? Well I'm not going to tell you. What does the word frindle mean? I'm not going to tell you that either. Just like the book Frindle, I made up a word. Now you know what Muga Muga means. You will have to figure out what frindle means by reading th ebook Frindle. I had to read this book in my language arts class. It was one of the best books that i ever read.

    6 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 21, 2009

    This book is the best!

    Pens! Pens! Frindles?
    Nick Allen has always been creative. He made his classroom into Hawaii in February. But this time he creates something that affects the whole country: a new word (Frindle meaning pen). There is one problem, Nick's own English teacher. Watch Nick take twist and turns to keep using his word. But he just might lose it. read and find out.
    I like this book because you have a special feeling that you can make a word too. Also once you start you'll be surging for more. You will have a strange but great feeling while reading Frindle.
    I liked that Nick was trying to make a new word. I also liked how the author made it feel so real, but in reality not true.
    I recommend this book to people who like to read books that actually feel real. If you like words or school or want to read an extraordinary book read Frindle. This one book. is truly amazing.
    If you like Frindle you can read these other books by Andrew Clements: Room One, Lunch Money, No Talking, The Landry News, and The Janitor's Boy.~ by Hanil 9

    6 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 28, 2008

    This book is AWESOME!!!!!

    I recommend this book to kids 7 and up. I read this book in three days because I couldn't put the book down! This book is great for everyone.

    6 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 7, 2012

    Abbey Normal

    I remember the influences this book first gave me. Technically, it influenced my whole class, but you get the point. After my library teacher read this book to us (who is now a homeroom teacher [that doesn't really matter, but I thought I'd just throw that in there] ), we couldn't get over the word "frindle." We said "frindle" instead of "pen" for two weeks, but it didn't catch on because we were fourth graders so we couldn't use pens. This book was pretty fun to read though...

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2012

    Frindle

    So FUNNY! :)

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 29, 2012

    AWESOME!!!!

    This book is completely worth the money, and it truly is an AWESOME book i read it and it was A REALLY GOODBOOK

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 7, 2012

    I HATED THIS BOOK DO NOT READ!

    The story line got too repetitive, and the plot got boring. I read this in 1st grade, and i still remember when i finally gave up reading because of the repetitive storyline and completely unrealistic circumstances.DO NOT WASTE YOUR MONEY!

    4 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 2, 2012

    Click for review

    Hhhhhhhhhhooooooooooooooorrrrrrrrrrrrrriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiibbbbbbbbbbblllllllllllllllllllleeeeeeeeeeeer!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I am not even kidding. Don't waste your money don't buy it.

    4 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 15, 2012

    Best book ever

    Im reading this book in school it is the best how they call a pen a frindle

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 29, 2011

    Sample reading

    I was reading the sample but it was only about 4 pages of actual reading. I have read this book before so I wanted to read it again but I couldn't.

    4 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 8, 2011

    it was a fantastic book

    I read this book and I would recommend it to my friends or anyone. And the reason why is because it shows how far your imagination can take you. I really liked how Nick would not give up even when Mrs. Granger was making it so difficult. Nick was very brave by not giving up on his believes. I think that other people that experience something like this they will give up. Well this is an example of why you should not give up on your dreams because they can come true if you work hard to make that dream come true.
    When my teacher assigned me to read this book and when I started to read it I could not stop because it was very interesting. This book teaches that if you believe in something or have a dream and you what to make it come true if you work hard it will come true. I liked the author's writing style and I would defenetly like to read other books by him.

    4 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 21, 2012

    :-)

    Absoulutly loved it .( even thouh i read it in 2nd grade and i am in 5th)

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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