Fritz Danced the Fandango

Fritz Danced the Fandango

by Alicia Potter, Ethan Long
     
 

Fritz is just like every other mountain goat, except for one small difference: He likes to dance the fandango.

Unfortunately, Fritz finds himself the object of ridicule among the other goats, so he sets out to find a herd that will accept him. Along the way, he meets a yodeling sheep named Liesl and a glockenspiel-playing dog named Gerhard, both of whom are

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Overview

Fritz is just like every other mountain goat, except for one small difference: He likes to dance the fandango.

Unfortunately, Fritz finds himself the object of ridicule among the other goats, so he sets out to find a herd that will accept him. Along the way, he meets a yodeling sheep named Liesl and a glockenspiel-playing dog named Gerhard, both of whom are also looking for their places in the world. While Fritz never finds any other dancing mountain goats, he does find true friends (and willing dance partners) in Liesl and Gerhard.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Mary Hynes-Berry
Anyone who finds themselves marching to the beat of a different drummer and longing for a few companions who keep the same beat will love this story of the mountain goat Fritz who loves nothing so much as clip, clip, clippety clopping the fandango. The rest of the herd is not amused, and Fritz goes off to find someone with who he can dance. He comes across a yodeling goat named Liesl and a glockenspiel playing dog. When those two music makers learn to dance the fandango, Fritz knows he has found the herd of his heart. Long's illustrations have exactly the right zany, good-humored feel as the text. There is enough depth and charm in this work to make it part of a primary classroom's social-emotional curriculum. The very fact that the tone is light would allow it to trigger good discussions about friendship and respecting the rights of others to be themselves. Reviewer: Mary Hynes-Berry
School Library Journal

PreS-Gr 2

Feeling that his talents are unappreciated, a goat leaves his herd in the mountains to follow his muse and find a fandango-dancing flock. Alas, he can only find a yodeling ewe and a glockenspiel-playing dog. The three of them wander together trying fruitlessly to find dancing goats, until Fritz goes off alone, giving up hope of fulfillment. Then the sound of hooves brings him back to find his friends dancing the fandango and offering themselves as his new "herd." The joyful conclusion features dancing, yodeling, and glockenspiel pinging as the pals cavort across the hills. This homage to following one's dream and the value of friendship features short sentences and a straightforward plot. The workmanlike art depicts big-eyed, daffy-looking characters set against a spare, Saturday-morning-cartoon background of blue sky and purple hills. Libraries in need of additional material celebrating individuality might consider this title.-Marge Loch-Wouters, La Crosse Public Library, WI

Kirkus Reviews
Marching-dancing, rather-to the beat of a different drummer, Fritz whirls and twirls away from his mocking fellow goats in search of a herd that respects terpsichoreans. Along the way he picks up Liesl, a sheep who's been booted from her flock for yodeling ("YODEL-LAY-HEEEEEEEEEEEE-EWE!"), and Gerhard the dog, similarly exiled for playing the glockenspiel. Long illustrates this distant cousin to "The Bremen Town Musicians" in bright, Bill Peet-style cartoons, depicting the three pop-eyed fellow travelers trotting up and down grassy sunlit hills with purple mountains in the near background. When Fritz at length loses heart ("Will I ever find my herd? Am I destined to dance alone?"), his companions twirl loyally into the breach, dancing his dance and making such a "ruckus on the buttercuppy hills" that Fritz's heart "fandangoed with joy." Since Fritz's capering includes lots of leaps, it looks more like ballet than traditional fandango, but no matter-the trio's quest should be a short one, considering all the performing livestock already on library shelves, and the theme of unity-in-diversity is brought home with a light touch. (Picture book. 6-8)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780545075541
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
05/01/2009
Pages:
40
Product dimensions:
9.30(w) x 11.20(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile:
AD330L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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