The Frog Prince

( 21 )

Overview

What happens when the fairy tale is over?

Once upon a time, a lovely maiden from Fresno married the man of her dreams. After the honeymoon, she waited for the "happily ever after" part... until her Prince Charming turned out to be a toad. Now Holly Bishop is about to write a new chapter in her life. She moves to San Francisco to become an event planner -- only to find that she is dealing with a gorgeous fairy godmother for a boss and corporate witches wicked enough to sabotage ...

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The Frog Prince

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Overview

What happens when the fairy tale is over?

Once upon a time, a lovely maiden from Fresno married the man of her dreams. After the honeymoon, she waited for the "happily ever after" part... until her Prince Charming turned out to be a toad. Now Holly Bishop is about to write a new chapter in her life. She moves to San Francisco to become an event planner -- only to find that she is dealing with a gorgeous fairy godmother for a boss and corporate witches wicked enough to sabotage her future. Not to mention the egomaniacal frogs Holly finds lurking at the bottom of the dating pool.

With no one to save her will Holly slay the dragons herself and stand on her her own for the very first time? Will the man behind the mask at her costume ball make her believe in love again? And will she risk giving up her dreams to become the heroine of her own story?

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
When Californian Holly Bishop marries her Prince Charming in a fairy-tale wedding, she expects to live happily ever after. Unfortunately, the happiness ends with the start of the honeymoon, when her husband admits he doesn't find her sexually attractive, and 14 months later, she divorces him. Determined to start anew, she moves from small-time Fresno to San Francisco to forge a career as an event planner but isn't confident enough to make it work. Still desperate to know where her marriage went wrong and with a nasty boss, no close friends, and a succession of bad dates, she finds life unbearable until she meets a newspaper editor who helps her believe in herself. When a high-profile project of hers is sabotaged and she loses her job, she at last rises to the challenge and sets her life in order. A tighter plot and more scrupulous editing might have made this story a winner. As is, it's typical chick-lit fare from the author of several Harlequin romances (e.g., Marco's Pride). Not bad, but an optional purchase for public libraries.-Rebecca Vnuk, River Forest P.L., IL Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781940296289
  • Publisher: The Tule Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 3/19/2014
  • Pages: 262
  • Sales rank: 732,017
  • Product dimensions: 5.25 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.59 (d)

Meet the Author

Jane Porter
The bestselling author of 47 romances and women's fiction titles, Jane Porter has been a finalist for the prestigious RITA award five times, and today has over 12 million copies in print. Porter wrote Flirting with Forty, a novel picked by Redbook Magazine as it's Red Hot Summer Read in 2006 before being turned into a Lifetime movie in 2008 starring Heather Locklear. Jane holds an MA in Writing from the University of San Francisco and makes her home in sunny San Clemente, CA with her surfer husband and three sons. You can learn more about Jane at janeporter.com.
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Read an Excerpt

The Frog Prince


By Jane Porter

Warner Books

Copyright © 2005 Jane Porter
All right reserved.

ISBN: 0-446-69449-5


Chapter One

Here comes the bride, all dressed in white. There goes the groom, running from the room ...

And there's my single mom, spending the next twenty years paying for a lavish wedding for a marriage that didn't even last a year.

Frick.

What happens now? What happens when you've had the fairy tale?

When you've done the big wedding? The dream honeymoon? What happens after the fantasy's over?

You file for divorce. Divorce. Such a big concept for what amounts to a little word.

I still can't quite say it, can't feel anything when I think it, can't imagine that we're now talking about me. But I was the one in the wedding gown, and then I was the one talking to a lawyer, and I was the one who had to ask my brother and my girlfriends and their boyfriends to help me pack so the movers could move me.

I've recently changed cities. Jobs. Lives. I'm starting all over again. But of course, it's not the same. It'll never be the same. Because I've done it. I've been married and divorced, and I'm not even twenty-six.

Long and short of it? He was perfect. I was raised in the country; he was French; together that made us French country. Perfect. The house was perfect; the car, a smokygray Citroen, was perfect; the clothes and restaurant and champagne ... perfect, perfect, perfect!

Not perfect.

Hindsight's amazing. I can see now there were problems in our relationship-huge problems, like trust, respect, and sexual compatibility. I should have known Jean-Marc wasn't attracted to me. I should have known he was avoiding physical intimacy. But I didn't. I blamed it on the wedding, new financial commitments, the stress of my moving into his house.

Maybe if I'd dated more ... Maybe if I'd had more realistic expectations ...

Maybe if I hadn't read fairy tales and then later all those romance novels I bought at the used-book store ...

But back to reality, and I've got more than enough to deal with in reality, what with my new job, in my new apartment, in my new city, with my new boss who doesn't seem to approve of anything I do.

In fact, right now my new boss, Olivia Dempsey, is standing next to my desk at City Events here in San Francisco, and she isn't happy. She's currently conveying her unhappiness in a very loud, crisp voice.

"I thought we talked about this," Olivia says, fashionably slim, toned arms crossed. "You have to take charge of your life, Holly. You're dying on the vine, girl."

I don't look up, because I don't want to hear this, at least not again, not so soon this week. Didn't I just get the need-to-get-out-more pep talk on Monday?

"You were crying in the bathroom again, weren't you?" I open my mouth to deny it, but she holds up a finger and wags it in front of my face. "Oh, no, no lying. No denying. And you weren't just crying; you were sobbing."

"I wasn't sobbing." I shoot her a disgusted look because even the word "sobbing" is irritating, but I know my eyes are red.

Olivia leans down, puts her face in mine. "Sara heard you." Sara being another member of Olivia's team.

I'm beginning to think I'm not ever going to warm up to Sara. She tries too hard to get Olivia to like her. "I'm over it," I say, forcing a toothy grin and feeling absurdly like the wolf from "Little Red Riding Hood."

"See?"

"Hmmph" is all Olivia gives me, but Olivia has no idea how hard all this is for me. No one knows how hard this has been.

There are days I still don't know how I manage to climb from the bed and stagger into the shower, days when I still cry as I make coffee and try to apply mascara and eyeliner between mopping up tears. It's just that I'd barely gotten used to the idea of being a bride, and now I'm a ... divorcee?

"You need to start getting out," Olivia adds firmly, her tone no-nonsense. "It's time for you to be proactive, not reactive."

Of course she'd think like this. She grew up immersed in the world of professional sports, and everything to Olivia is about offense and defense. If Olivia were an athlete, she'd be a quarterback and a pitcher rolled up into one.

"I'm getting out," I say, shifting uneasily, knowing that Olivia's voice carries and not being particularly eager to have the rest of the staff hear my shortcomings. Again. "I'm here, aren't I?"

It was supposed to be a joke, but she doesn't laugh. "This is work, Holly."

"Exactly."

Olivia rolls her eyes. She's beautiful. Even when she rolls her eyes, she looks sleek. Sexy. With the ultimate in DNA-Olivia's mother is a former model, the blonde, glossy type that graced the pages of Sports Illustrated, while her father dominated the Oakland Raiders' offense, a star wide receiver still talked about in hushed voices twenty years later. Olivia is perfection. She modeled for two years in Paris but hated it, apparently modeling wasn't challenging, as it did nothing for her mind.

"This is no social life," she says, leaning against the edge of my desk, her long legs even longer in snug, lowwaisted trousers, her black cashmere turtleneck sweater cropped short enough to reveal two inches of flat, toned midriff.

I feel like a slice of Wonder bread. "I don't need one." Her gray-green eyes narrow, squint. She looks at me hard, the same up-and-down sweep she gives decorated ballrooms before handing responsibility over to an underling. "You need something bad, girl."

Yes. I need my bed with my duvet pulled up over my head, but it's only Wednesday, and I have two more days before I get to dive back between my covers and stay there for the rest of the weekend. "Am I not performing?" I ask, trying to shift the focus from personal back to professional. Olivia was the one who hired me three months ago. She'd be the one who'd fire me.

Another narrowed-gaze inspection. "You've lost your ... edge."

Edge? I don't remember having an edge. I was desperate when I interviewed for the job, but there never really was an edge. I mentally add "Get edge" to my increasingly lengthy to-do list.

"You need attitude," she continues. "Presence." I say nothing because, quite frankly, I do have an attitude, and I suspect it's not the one she wants.

"What do you do when you go home, Holly?" Olivia's fine arched brows beetle. "Sit down in front of the TV-"

"No ..."

"Eat your way through a bag of chips? A carton of Ben and Jerry's Chunky Monkey?"

"I don't even like Chunky Monkey."

Olivia is gaining momentum. Her purple-black polished nails tap-tap the laminate on my desk. Her stellar eyebrows flatten. "You're getting fat."

The word "fat" hangs there a moment between us, pointed, sharp. Ugly. This is a full-scale assault.

For a moment nothing comes to mind, and I inhale hard, topple forward in my chair, feet clattering to stop my fall.

I check to see if anyone else has heard. This is about as low as anyone could go. She knows it. I know it. "I'm not fat."

Surreptitiously I glance down at my lap, homing in on my thighs. They do look rather big, but that's because I'm wearing speckled wool pants, and the fuzzy spotted texture isn't exactly slimming. "My clothes fit fine." Olivia shrugs. Says nothing.

I feel all hot on the inside, hot and prickly and a little bit queasy. I move my right thigh, check the shape. It does look rather spread out on the chair. "I need to work out," I add awkwardly. "I haven't joined a gym since moving here."

She shrugs again, and I look down, see my lunch still sitting on my desk: a half-eaten burrito, guacamole and sour cream oozing, obscuring the chicken and black beans.

I can picture my leg naked. Or what it must look like naked if I ever looked at myself in a full-length mirror anymore, because I avoid mirrors, especially full-length mirrors. I haven't taken a look at myself naked in, oh, three months-ever since I moved to San Francisco and realized I couldn't bear to look me in the eye, couldn't bear to see what I, once so pathetically hopeful, had become.

But beyond the burrito and the mirror, it's not all bad. I still drink Diet Coke. I've always drunk Diet Coke. There are limits to indulgence, and I know mine. "The point is," Olivia says more delicately, "you go straight home after work. You sit on your couch. Veg in front of the TV. That's no life, and you know it." For a moment I say nothing, because I'm not even thinking about my new apartment in San Francisco, but about the house I left in Fresno, where until recently I'd been a brand-spanking-new wife.

The house in Old Fig Garden was originally Jean-Marc's, a 1950s ranch that looked cozy and cottage-y with a split-rail fence and hardy yellow summer roses. After we married, I couldn't wait to make the house mine, too, and I loved personalizing it, adding festive, feminine touches like the new cherry-sprigged dish towels from my bridal shower, hanging on towel bars in the kitchen, or the sparkly crystal vase with zinnias and yellow roses displayed on Jean-Marc's dining table. We had new 300-threadcount sheets on the king-size bed and fluffy white-and-blue towels in the bathroom, and it was like a dollhouse. Charming. Warm. Storybook.

Turns out I wasn't the storybook wife.

"Holly."

Olivia's impatience cuts, and I look up quickly, so quickly I have to bite my lip to keep the rush of emotion away.

"You moved here to start fresh." Olivia taps her nail on my desk. "So do it."

Olivia's right. I'm lonely as hell, but I've hit the place where it's not just a little lonely but really lonely. The lonely where you slide below the radar screen, lonely where you've become pathetic, lonely where it's better just to stay inside, hidden from civilization.

I don't belong in civilization. I'm a misfit. A blight. Well, maybe not a blight. But I definitely feel like a pimple on a chin. As you know, not a good way to feel. Cautiously I shift my left leg, checking to see if the left thigh spreads as much as the right. It does. I suppress the rising panic. I'm in trouble, aren't I?

I look up, meet Olivia's eyes. "I am a little ... big ... ger."

The light of battle shines in Olivia's eyes. "It's not the end of the world. Yet." She sounds crisp now, decisive, as if we've settled on a plan, and she leans forward, urgency in her voice. "The key is to get a grip. Face whatever it is you're avoiding." She pauses, considers me. "Are you still in love with him?"

Him? Him, who? And then I realize she's talking about Jean-Marc. "Y-no. No!" I repeat more forcefully, because I'm not. How could I still be in love with a man who essentially rejected me on our honeymoon?

But Olivia isn't convinced. "Do you need professional help? There's no shame-"

"No." God, this is so humiliating. Olivia could be my mother. My mother would handle a conversation this way. "I'm fine. I'm ... better. Getting better." And bigger, according to Olivia. I squeeze out a smile. "But you're right. I need to take charge. Join a gym. Take better care of myself."

"What else?"

What else? I thought that was really good stuff. Olivia rises, and her stomach goes concave, making her trousers hit even lower on her magnificent hip bones.

"You need friends."

"I have friends."

"Where?" I open my mouth, but she holds up a slender honey-cocoa finger. "Don't say 'here.' Work isn't your social circle. If you got fired-"

"Am I getting fired?" Olivia doesn't own the company, but as a director she's high up in management, knows everything, has a say in everything. It doesn't hurt that Olivia has that enviable trait called star quality. People want to be around Olivia. Customers flock to City Events to work with Olivia. Olivia makes things happen.

"No." Olivia glances at my half-eaten burrito in the foil wrapper, the crumpled napkin on my desk, the Diet Coke with the smudge of lipstick on the rim, and the files spread open in front of me. "You work hard; you're conscientious, detail oriented."

But?

"But what happens here, at your desk, is only part of the job," she adds. "We're all responsible for bringing in new accounts, for promoting City Events, and one of the best ways to sell City Events is by selling you." And she smiles, a dazzling smile of lovely straight white teeth-her own, not veneers. "But you know that, Holly, and that's why I hired you."

I like her, I really do, and yet right now I'm wanting to crawl under my desk and stay there forever. More pathetic internal monologue: if Jean-Marc had loved me, I wouldn't be here, in San Francisco, in a strange, cold apartment, at a strange, confusing job, trying to figure out where I got it wrong, how I failed in love, why I'm the first of my friends to marry, as well as the first to divorce.

Rationally, I know that Olivia is trying to help me. It's her job to give me feedback and direction, but honestly, her cool, crisp analysis cuts, wounding my already bruised self-esteem. I know we're not supposed to rely on others for our self-worth. I know we're supposed to look inside for validation, but how are you supposed to like yourself, much less love yourself, when the person you trust most asks you just to go away?

"Two words," Olivia says, holding up two fingers and looking down her long, elegant nose at me.

"Zone diet?"

"Image. Success."

I can feel my thighs sprawl on the chair, the weight of my limp ponytail on my neck. How can it be only Wednesday? I need Friday. I really need Friday.

"You've got to take charge, Holly. I know you said in the interview you've just been through a rough patch-divorce, you said-but it's time to return to the land of the living. Get back in the ring. Make something happen."

"Right." And she is right. More or less. "We're going out for drinks after work. Join us. You already know some of my friends, and you'll meet some new people. It'll be good for you."

"Right." Her friends are gorgeous. And manically extroverted. A thought comes to me. "But cocktails have calories."

"A lot less than a pint of Ben and Jerry's." Enough said.

Olivia walks away. I stare at my desk. So that's where we are. I'm Holly Bishop, living the suddenly single girl life in San Francisco, which is also the turtleneck capital of the United States. Everyone here wears turtlenecks, lots and lots of black and gray turtlenecks with the inevitable leather coat, barn coat, barn leather coat. It might be the City by the Bay, but it's also the City of Cold Hands, Neck, and Feet.

Despite the need for sweaters even in July, I'm told that San Francisco is a great city to live in. You don't have to drive to get around; there's decent public transportation, but I don't know anyone who actually takes the public transportation. We drive on the West Coast.

And drive.

And drive.

We also pay huge sums to park. We pay for parking at work. We pay for parking at home. We pay for parking each time we head out to shop or see a flick or do anything remotely fun. (This is new to me. I was raised in a small town where you got free angle parking on Main Street.)

But I'm not in Kansas anymore, or in California's Central Valley, for that matter.

Continues...


Excerpted from The Frog Prince by Jane Porter Copyright © 2005 by Jane Porter. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Reading Group Guide

On Divorce:
  1. Holly is devastated over the failure of her "storybook marriage." In what way has her upbringing shaped her outlook on what a good, happy marriage is supposed to be?
  2. "Di-vorce. Such a big concept for what amounts to a little word." What are your thoughts on this statement? Why can some people go the distance? What makes a relationship last? Is it trust, respect, sexual compatibility? Something else?
  3. Holly states, "Nothing lasts forever. Know when to say when!" Do you agree?
On Mother/Daughter Relationships:
  1. What are some of the incidents Holly recalls from her childhood which have led her to the assumption she has always been a disappointment to her mother? What effect has this had on her own attitude towards her mother?
  2. Holly feels guilty about her relationship with her mother. How do you relate to this in terms of your own relationship with your mother/parent? What makes Mother/Daughter relationships so complicated? Do you feel like you really know your mother, why or why not?
  3. How does the relationship between Holly and her mother change in the end? Or will it really change?
  4. The "Good Girl" Syndrome. Do you believe it truly exists, why or why not? Did you ever get lectured about being a good girl? What "good girl rules" (i.e. "Don't kiss on the 1st date?", "Don't get a reputation") were you aware of as an adolescent?
On New Beginnings:
  • Holly says, "Life isn't a series of reruns and instant replays. There are no second chances, not the way we'd like." Since one can't go back, how does one move forward?
  • Have you ever had to begin again? Start Over? Change jobs? Move to a new city? Make new friends? What was the hardest part and how did you handle it? What is your opinion on how Holly chooses to handle it?

On Relationships:

  1. Holly has a bad experience with Paul at the Italian restaurant, is embarrassed and leaves. Have you ever had a horrible dating experience, one in which you couldn't wait to get home? How did you cope with it?
  2. At the coffee shop, Holly meets a "hunk". Have you ever felt sexual attraction 'immediately' upon meeting someone? Was that due to physical appearance or personality? What is your opinion on the idea of falling in love at first sight?
  3. How do you feel about the statement there "has to be more magic somewhere? That good things can't just be at Disneyland? Adults need happy stories too?"
  4. How is Holly's concept of relationships affected by her father's betrayal to her family? Navigating the Business World:
  5. In what ways does the Good Girl Syndrome find its way into the business sector?
  6. How did Holly succeed in the corporate world? In what ways she did she fail?
  7. What are your thoughts on the character of Olivia Dempsey? What drives her? Do you know or work with someone who is like Olivia? Do women have to play hard or dirty to get ahead or can "nice" girls finish first? Why?

Women & Self Image:

  1. Holly's refuge from the harsh realities of divorce lies in the comfort of food and her warm bed. When you've had instances when life closed in on you, what did you do?
  2. Holly's mom feels that Jean-Marc and marriage was the answer to Holly's happiness. Do you believe this is generational, why or why not? And what is one of the most important lessons Holly has learned about life and relationships by the end of the book?
  3. Katie Robinson, Holly's old high school friend, questions why Holly married Jean-Marc. Holly shares she wanted to be special. Katie points out that a man doesn't make you special; you're special because you're you! In what ways have you had to learn this lesson?
  4. Holly says "One shouldn't have to die— physically or psychologically for love. Love should be about strength, not weakness. Empowerment not dependence. Shouldn't it?" Would a woman this age really think this way? Or is this Dr. Phil speak?
  5. What does Holly discover about her own personality in terms of fairy tales and princesses? How does the 'new' Holly compare to the old one?
  6. How realistic are Holly's attitudes on life in terms of modern women today? Does she seem like a real, living, breathing person to you, why or why not? How do you relate to Holly?

On Setting:

  1. The author, Jane Porter, has been quoted as saying she likes to use setting as a secondary character in her books. How do you see this in The Frog Prince? In what ways is her use of setting effective or evocative in The Frog Prince</1>? If set in another city, would this story work as well, why or why not?
  2. How does Holly's depiction of growing up in a small town affect you? Are her memories of Visalia realistic or senti-mental? Why are childhood memories often bittersweet?
  3. How do the author's descriptions of San Francisco make the city come alive for you? Have you ever traveled to San Francisco? If not, would you want to now? If so, what do you recall as some of your favorite things about the experience?
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 21 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(8)

4 Star

(9)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(3)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 22 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 4, 2013

    Sometimes you just have to let go of the past and the the fears

    Sometimes you just have to let go of the past and the the fears and regrets you have. In Holly's case, it's her bad marriage that she can't seem to get past. But, in this book, you see how she is able to finally get past all of that and enjoy life and finds a new love. This is one of those books that you'll want to read over and over.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 10, 2005

    Frog Prince

    The Frog Prince readers are taken to a new realm in discovering who you are and this book takes ¿relationships¿ to a new level. If you were raised to believe in fairy tales and along would come Prince Charming, then you will definitely relate to this book. It¿s an exploration into marriage, mother/daughter, sibling, friendship, and dating relationships. Holly the central character has been raised to be the ¿good girl¿, don¿t kiss on the first date, have a good reputation and basically keep your innermost feelings to yourself. She felt she really didn¿t know her mother nor her siblings and for the most part in her family, on the outside looking in. She marries Jean-Marc and thought this was an answer to her happiness. However, the marriage fails and she is empty and doesn't know how to ask for help from her family and friends. Relocation is Holly¿s only answer where she is now faced with a new city, new job and new friends. Here she learns there are no second chances and one can only move forward. Holly explores her past and what her future might hold. This book is an exploration for the reader as to why we need love, what makes a person special, do we suffer from family guilt, can we move forward and put past relationships behind and most important is there happy ever after? For the main character Holly, this was about learning who she was and moving forward. ¿It's the story of a young woman falling in love¿with herself. She discovers that she is wonderful, she's always been wonderful, all she has to do is trust herself¿. For me, this book hit right to the center of my heart! It was an exploration into my past, present and future as well. I sincerely recommend this book especially if you¿re a ¿Baby Boomer¿.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 5, 2005

    Frog Prince

    As simple as this review might seem....it touched my heart. The Frog Prince readers are taken to a new realm in discovering who you are and this book takes ¿relationships¿ to a new level. If you were raised to believe in fairy tales and along would come Prince Charming, then you will definitely relate to this book. It¿s an exploration into marriage, mother/daughter, sibling, friendship,the work place and dating relationships. Holly the central character has been raised to be the ¿good girl¿, don¿t kiss on the first date, have a good reputation and basically keep your innermost feelings to yourself. She felt she really didn¿t know her mother nor her siblings and for the most part in her family, on the outside looking in. She marries Jean-Marc and thought this was an answer to her happiness. However, the marriage fails and she is empty and doesn't know how to ask for help from her family and friends. Relocation is Holly¿s only answer where she is now faced with a new city, new job and new friends. Here she learns there are no second chances and one can only move forward. Holly explores her past and what her future might hold. This book is an exploration for the reader as to why we need love, what makes a person special, do we suffer from family guilt, can we move forward and put past relationships behind and most important is there happy ever after? For me, this book hit right to the center of my heart! It was an exploration into my past, present and future as well. I sincerely recommend this book especially if you¿re a ¿Baby Boomer¿.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 30, 2014

    Sometimes you just have to let go of the past and the the fears

    Sometimes you just have to let go of the past and the the fears and regrets you have. In Holly's case, it's her bad marriage that she can't seem to get past. But, in this book, you see how she is able to finally get past all of that and enjoy life and finds a new love. This is one of those books that you'll want to read over and over.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 5, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    Holly Bishop believed in the fairy tales. And, that old cliché a

    Holly Bishop believed in the fairy tales. And, that old cliché about kissing a lot of frogs to find your prince. But life smacks her in the face with her husband telling her on the honeymoon he doesn't want to be married. She tried everything before giving up and filing for divorce. Getting on with her life isn't easy despite starting over in a new town. Finally with a lot of kicking, screaming, cajoling from work and friends, plus a lot of hard work and determination, she finds her life and her bliss. She discovers that you don't need a man to complete you, you make your own happiness, and in the end you don't have to be a good girl to be a GOOD GIRL. Just be the best self you can be--shouldn't we all find this in ourselves?

    I loved this journey! It's a great book! Read it--and stop kissing toads!

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  • Posted January 9, 2013

    I forgot how great this book is! I read it a few years ago and d

    I forgot how great this book is! I read it a few years ago and decided to re-read it. Because Holly's character/life is so 
    relatable on so many levels, I couldn't put the book down till the very end. I loved that it ends on a happy note but its not the fairy tale
    we expect. Also love the message it gives- be confident and you don't have to be in a relationship to be happy.
     

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  • Posted January 2, 2013

    This was the first Jane Porter book I ever bought and because I

    This was the first Jane Porter book I ever bought and because I enjoyed it so much I became a reader of Porter's books for life. Jane's character Holly had the fairytale we all as little girls dream, about, but as most of us discover there is no such thing. She takes us on Holly's journey to make a new life for her, and learning to have confidence in herself. Holly doesn't have it easy just as life is not a piece of cake. I found myself cheering her on and maybe learning about myself in the process.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2006

    Heart Felt, Emotional Journey

    I read a lot of chick lit, and I was really surprised by this book. The emotional journey we take with the main character, Holly Bishop, is very well done. Jane Porter captures the fear and the pain Holly feels, but also lets us see her hopefulness in the end. I could not put this book down and I hope you won't either.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 30, 2005

    Girl Power

    This is not a serious read, but sometimes you just need some 'fluff' in your literary diet and this is a good piece of fluff. In a way, the writing style reminded me a bit of Janet Evanovich's Stephanie Plum novels. As a young woman myself living near San Francisco, I found this book endearing and empowering. She really develops as a strong woman through the pain life throws at her. Kudos to the author for writing a believable woman coming into her own and discovering what she's really made of.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 26, 2005

    Not your usual Fairy Tale!

    I'm a fan of Jane Porter's and this book lived up to her reputation. Good reading -- and moves fast. A great summer read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 12, 2005

    A Serious Beach Read

    This is one of my favorite books this summer. I am still thinking about the characters and how much of it is similar to parts of my own life. She says out loud what many of us think about family, friends and career. Also, having met the author on a book tour recently after I had already read the book made me want to read it again and think how her life and the choices she made. I hope there will be a sequel and I can't wait to see what she writes next!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 21, 2005

    Not Impressed

    I was expecting a fun, witty read, a typical chick-lit. Instead I was given this novel. The main character spends the first half of the novel moaning and complaining, asking the same questions countless times. Reading the second half of the book was the equivalent of reading a self-help psychology book, with much of the text being the main character's inner dialogue about needing to be her own person. This book didn't do it for me.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 5, 2005

    Expected more

    I was definitely disappointed with this book. I expected more independence and self-worth from the main character. The book is 200 pages longer than it needs to be and the main character is much too meek. Although the title depicts a fairy tale reference, the author excessively uses the metaphor throughout the novel. It has so much potential to be a real empowering book, but it's simply too flat.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 4, 2005

    More than Chick-Lit!

    I loved this book because it wasn't your usual chick-lit fare. Holly Bishop, the main character in The Frog Prince, was like someone you'd know in real life. The story is both funny and sad and while there's no easy fix to Holly's problems, she figures out what's important and gets her happy ending. I loved that this isn't just a dating book, too, but a story about moms and daughters and finding your place in the world.

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    Posted November 11, 2008

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