Frog Rescue: Changing the Future for Endangered Wildlife

Overview

From the book:
"It's on our watch that amphibians are checking out. I think we ought to be very concerned about that."

Frogs are found everywhere: from the tropics to north of the Arctic Circle, from the heights of the Himalayan Mountains to the driest deserts. Frogs live on every continent except Antarctica. They live part of their lives in water and part on land.

Frogs absorb moisture and even breathe ...

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Overview

From the book:
"It's on our watch that amphibians are checking out. I think we ought to be very concerned about that."

Frogs are found everywhere: from the tropics to north of the Arctic Circle, from the heights of the Himalayan Mountains to the driest deserts. Frogs live on every continent except Antarctica. They live part of their lives in water and part on land.

Frogs absorb moisture and even breathe through their skin. Unfortunately, their skin is also super-absorbent to deadly pollutants and their eggs are thin, jellylike bubbles that absorb waterborne pollutants. Consequently, frogs are first indicators of air, water and land pollutants, acting as a barometer for measuring the health of the environment. As such, they provide a valuable warning about our future if toxic elements continue to be released into the air, soil and water.

Frog Rescue profiles the disappearance and endangerment of frogs around the world. The book also covers a range of innovative programs used around the world to protect this vulnerable species.

Some of the frog species included are:

  • Australian frogs that rear their young in their stomachs
  • Poison dart frogs
  • Costa Rican golden toads.

About the Firefly Animal Rescue series:

The Firefly Animal Rescue identifies endangered and threatened species and what is being done to protect them. Combining lively, accessible text and stunning color photographs, each book provides a detailed overview of the species, describing its characteristics, behavior, habits, physiology and more.

"These attractive books are a call to action... fascinating readable accounts."
- School Library Journal

"Succinct introductions to the science and practice of wildlife conservation... written in accessible, lively language."
- Booklist

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Frogs are disappearing. Why are the frogs disappearing? First, hydroelectric dams are disrupting the flow of rivers. Then, a fungus called chytrid has been found on nearly a hundred frog species from six continents. Natural disasters such as the Australian bushfires in the summer of 2003 revealed that frogs were carrying a disease which made them unable to spring back from natural disasters to their habitat. All of these contribute to the decline of the frog along with humans who are harming the frog by using frogs for dissection in high school biology classes, pets, and even medicinal uses. This nonfiction text, part of the "Changing the Future for Endangered Wildlife" series, will enlighten readers about the connection between a frog's environment and their survival as a species. The book includes beautiful photography, easy to read sections with excellent supporting text from various sources, and a listing of organizations that are protecting the frog. The book is a perfect choice for an eighth or ninth grade science classroom or library. 2004, Firefly Books, Ages 12 to 15.
—Mindy Hardwick
School Library Journal
Gr 5 Up-These well-written titles introduce endangered or threatened species, describe how and why they are in danger, and explain what efforts are being made to protect them. In each book, a time line of conservation efforts with regard to the creatures' environments, research, and the law is included. Illustrated fast-fact sections provide information on name, size, life span, reproduction, diet, and more. Stunning, full-color photographs bring each species to life and depict a number of individuals in the field and laboratory working to save these animals. Each book also examines what the future looks like (bleak), and includes information on "How You Can Help." This last section lists contact information for conservation clubs and organizations. Each book includes an excellent index. These attractive titles are a call to action.-Cynde Suite, Bartow County Library System, Adairsville, GA Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Green Teacher - Debra Bridgman
Award winning... With beautiful photography and inspiring examples of individuals passionately devoted to wildlife conservation, these are excellent resource for the classroom or school library.
Library Media Connection - Ruie Chehak
[review of series:] Anyone interested in learning more about endangered animals will find these books fascinating... This series will make a strong addition to any school library.
Resource Links - Eva Wilson
This beautiful book is another gem from Firefly Books. The photographs on all pages are spectacular with corresponding text appropriately located... This visual treat packed with information will fascinate the youngest readers and stimulate the older students. A must have book.
Canadian Materials - Gillian Richardson
Amazing facts about the dramatic decline of frogs worldwide... Clear, high quality photos add to the interest in this well-designed book... up-to-date information.
Globe and Mail - Susan Perren
Countering this dire state of affairs [frog population decline] is the heartening work being done by a number of scientists around the world, many of whom are featured in this book... Vivid photographs.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781552975978
  • Publisher: Firefly Books, Limited
  • Publication date: 10/2/2004
  • Series: Firefly Animal Rescue Series
  • Pages: 64
  • Age range: 10 - 13 Years
  • Product dimensions: 9.25 (w) x 9.25 (h) x 0.37 (d)

Meet the Author

Garry Hamilton writes articles focusing on science, natural history, ecology, evolution and conservation. His work has appeared in magazines worldwide, including Audubon, Equinox, New Scientist, The Ecologist and Wildlife Conservation.

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Read an Excerpt

It's a Frog's Life

Frogs are amazingly diverse. You can find them in tropical rain forests, north of the Arctic Circle, high in the Himalaya Mountains and in many of the world's driest deserts.

They've also been around a lot longer than you might think. Frogs first appeared at least 190 million years ago, when Earth was still dominated by dinosaurs. Their ancestors were the first large animals to live on dry land. Today, there are close to 5,000 known frog species, and the list continues to grow as scientists probe deeper into the remote corners of the planet. Together with salamanders and caecilians (worm-like creatures that live mainly underground), they are amphibians -- animals that live part of their lives in water and part on land.

But frogs are in trouble. Fewer than 30 years ago, herpetologists -- scientists who study amphibians and reptiles -- began to notice that frogs were disappearing from areas where they once thrived. By 1989, amphibians were in dramatic decline all over the world, and it wasn't just in areas crowded with people. Many species were disappearing from the remote wilderness as well. "Until that point, I don't think anybody realized that it was anything other than a local problem," says one veteran biologist.

Different species face different threats. The destruction of their habitat, overharvesting by humans, competition from other species and deadly diseases cause local problems. Pollution, climate change and increased radiation from the sun may be making matters worse on a global scale. Some 32 frog species are now thought to have died out since the early 1970s, and another 25 are classified as "missing in action" -- they're either extinct, orso rare that scientists haven't been able to find them. Almost a hundred others are critically endangered.

While these lists are likely to grow, there is hope. During the past decade, researchers have been working together and sharing information on frog declines. They're learning more about what's killing the frogs -- and what needs to be done to save them.

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Table of Contents

It's a frog's life
Where do frogs live?
The story so far
Make yourself at home
Under my skin
ON THE FRONTLINES: Disappearing in the Mist
AT WORK: David Wake
Fungus among us
ON THE FRONTLINES: Up in smoke
AT WORK: Gerry Marantelli
The frog trade
ON THE FRONTLINES: A pet project
AT WORK: Mirza Dikari Kusrini
When aliens attack
ON THE FRONTLINES: Changing their spots
Heavyweight bout
My, how you've changed
The case of the five-legged frog
Frog or toad?
Creative caregivers
ON THE FRONTLINES: No toad is an island
Global warning?
Why save frogs?
The future for frogs
Fast facts
How you can help
Index
Photo credits
Author's note

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First Chapter

It's a Frog's Life

Frogs are amazingly diverse. You can find them in tropical rain forests, north of the Arctic Circle, high in the Himalaya Mountains and in many of the world's driest deserts.

They've also been around a lot longer than you might think. Frogs first appeared at least 190 million years ago, when Earth was still dominated by dinosaurs. Their ancestors were the first large animals to live on dry land. Today, there are close to 5,000 known frog species, and the list continues to grow as scientists probe deeper into the remote corners of the planet. Together with salamanders and caecilians (worm-like creatures that live mainly underground), they are amphibians — animals that live part of their lives in water and part on land.

But frogs are in trouble. Fewer than 30 years ago, herpetologists — scientists who study amphibians and reptiles — began to notice that frogs were disappearing from areas where they once thrived. By 1989, amphibians were in dramatic decline all over the world, and it wasn't just in areas crowded with people. Many species were disappearing from the remote wilderness as well. "Until that point, I don't think anybody realized that it was anything other than a local problem," says one veteran biologist.

Different species face different threats. The destruction of their habitat, overharvesting by humans, competition from other species and deadly diseases cause local problems. Pollution, climate change and increased radiation from the sun may be making matters worse on a global scale. Some 32 frog species are now thought to have died out since the early 1970s, and another 25 are classified as "missing in action" — they're either extinct, or so rare that scientists haven't been able to find them. Almost a hundred others are critically endangered.

While these lists are likely to grow,
there is hope. During the past decade, researchers have been working together and sharing information on frog declines. They're learning more about what's killing the frogs — and what needs to be done to save them.

Read More Show Less

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