×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Frog
     

Frog

by Susan Cooper
 

See All Formats & Editions

Little Joe isn't afraid of the water, but he can't swim. He only splashes around. This makes him sad because everyone in his family swims easily and well -- and Joe longs to.

One day, a very small frog from a nearby pond hops over and right into the pool. Joe watches him swim back and forth, kicking hard with his strong back legs. Joe's brother and sister try

Overview

Little Joe isn't afraid of the water, but he can't swim. He only splashes around. This makes him sad because everyone in his family swims easily and well -- and Joe longs to.

One day, a very small frog from a nearby pond hops over and right into the pool. Joe watches him swim back and forth, kicking hard with his strong back legs. Joe's brother and sister try to grab Frog or chase him out. Joe's dad brings a net to scoop up Frog. Even Joe's mother joins in. Joe just watches. But when his family grows tired of the chase, Joe manages to rescue the tiny frog. Then he looks at the pool. If he imitates the frog, will he finally be able to swim? This charming story, simply told by a much-loved author, will encourage small children who long to swim, and delight all those who already can. Jane Browne's full-color paintings catch perfectly the small drama of Joe and Frog's adventure.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Little Joe was the only one in his family who couldn't swim. Everyone laughed at him because all he could do was splash around. One day a very small frog from a pond not far away hopped into Little Joe's swimming pool. Joe's mother, his sister, and his brother tried unsuccessfully to get the frog out. When they left the pool, Little Joe watched the frog for awhile, then gently lifted him out of the water and set him on the way back to his safe pond home. Then Little Joe got into the pool, kicked with his legs, just as the frog did, and swam across the pool. This gentle tale, whose illustrations feature lots of watery blues and a realistic boy and frog, delighted at least one little boy the day before his first swimming lesson. Although this is a striking departure from Ms. Cooper's award-winning books featuring ghosts and boggarts, it should have an equally strong appeal for its intended audience. 2002, Margaret K. McElderry Books/Simon & Schuster Childrens Books,
— Janet Crane Barley
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-His mother swims "like a powerboat" and his siblings move through the water like fish. Little Joe, however, cannot swim at all. But one day a small frog hops into the pool from its nearby pond, and the child spends time observing the way it kicks its strong back legs. After the various family members' failed attempts to capture it, he climbs into the pool, cups the frightened creature in his hand, and releases it to its own habitat. Then "he kicked with his legs, and he swam all the way across the pool, just like Frog." This story of triumph over a difficult task is told briefly and simply from the child's vantage point. Watery endpapers usher in watercolor scenes of a family enjoying their pool on a hot day. Frog's desperate attempts to climb out are depicted in repeated illustrations of the animal in different positions, and the close-up of frog and boy reveals their special bond. However, Little Joe's swim across the pool happens so quickly that it strains credibility. Jonathan London's character in Froggy Learns to Swim (Viking, 1995) needs much more help and may strike a more sympathetic note with young readers.-Marianne Saccardi, Norwalk Community College, CT Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
A pellucid small story with an economy of words and a lot of meaning. Little Joe is out by the family pool. His siblings swim "like fishes" and his mom, "like a powerboat." But Joe can't swim at all, and is teased about it. A tiny frog lands in the pool and can't get out, despite the family's noisy efforts. But Joe goes quietly nearby, puts his hand gently under the frog, and lifts it out of the pool toward its pond home. Joe's been watching the frog carefully, too, and following the pattern of its strong kicks, swims across the pool at last. Words like "splashed" and "hopped" are typeset in waggly large letters so they leap from the page, a visual cue to the onomatopoeia that punctuates the story's understated rhythm. Bright blue water, green backyard, and sturdy human figures make a fine frame for the tiny, perfectly rendered frog, which has the most personality of all. It is lovely to see so much about family dynamics, respect for the natural world, and learning skills packed into one sun-filled tale. (Picture book. 4-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780099432265
Publisher:
Random House UK
Publication date:
04/22/2003
Pages:
32
Age Range:
5 - 7 Years

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews