From 60 Yards In: How to Master Golf's Short Game

Overview

Tips on the Short Game from Golf Legend Ray Floyd

The short game is arguably the hardest part of golf. Hitting the ball off the tee is easy compared to the recovery shots and touch shots needed to get the ball onto the green and into the hole.

Ray Floyd is an acknowledged master of the short game, and he strongly credits his longtime success to his proficiency form 60 yards in.

In this profusely illustrated ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (36) from $1.99   
  • New (4) from $15.64   
  • Used (32) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$15.64
Seller since 2005

Feedback rating:

(140)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
New Softcover book in excellent condition.

Ships from: Magnolia, TX

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$17.33
Seller since 2006

Feedback rating:

(966)

Condition: New
1992-03-31 Paperback New New Item. Item delivered via UPS in 7-9 business days. Tracking available by request Ships from US. Please allow 1-3 weeks for delivery outside US.

Ships from: Appleton, WI

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$24.02
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(573)

Condition: New
Brand New and Unused. Remainder mark on the bottom edge.

Ships from: Narberth, PA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$145.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(164)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

Tips on the Short Game from Golf Legend Ray Floyd

The short game is arguably the hardest part of golf. Hitting the ball off the tee is easy compared to the recovery shots and touch shots needed to get the ball onto the green and into the hole.

Ray Floyd is an acknowledged master of the short game, and he strongly credits his longtime success to his proficiency form 60 yards in.

In this profusely illustrated book, Floyd shares his personal theories on all facets of the short game: pitching, chipping, putting, and more. He describes what has worked for him and some of his colleagues and makes suggestions on how to vary shots depending on the reader's abilities and tendencies. He relates anecdotes of famous shots that have won for him, offers a wide range of practice exercises, and explains how the pros calmly handle unusual shots that leave duffers perplexed.

In all, this book will increase readers' golf smarts, bolster their confidence and lower their scores.

A legendary and acknowledged master teaches golf enthusiasts his championship-winning techniques for playing golf's short game. With a wide range of exercises--accompanied by detailed illustrations and photos--this is the ultimate golf book to bolster confidence and lower scores.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780060922856
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 3/11/1992
  • Edition description: REPRINT
  • Pages: 176
  • Product dimensions: 6.12 (w) x 9.25 (h) x 0.44 (d)

Meet the Author

Ray Floyd won his first tournament at age twenty in 1963 and has been winning ever since, including the 1969 PGA Championship, the 1976 Masters, the 1982 PGA Championship, and the 1986 U.S. Open at the age of forty-three. In all, he's won twenty-two tournaments and stands tenth-highest overall in career earnings. He will be joining the Senior PGA Tour in the fall of 1992.

Larry Dennis was a senior editor at Golf Digest for thirteen years. He has written six other major instruction books.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

GOLF AND THE MIND
An Overview

At its highest level, on the professional tours, golf is being played better today than ever before. There are many theories that account for this -- the ball goes farther, the clubs are better, the players are stronger -- all of which may have some validity. My own theory, and I can substantiate it pretty well, is that so many players are making so many low scores because they are superb around and on the greens.

I don't think players today are the shot makers, with the full swings, that we had when I started playing. Mostly they just beat it long and, hopefully, straight. But they are artists with the wedge, the chipping clubs, and the putter. Why? Because they have to be to survive.

Everybody today just goes for the flag. I think the all-exempt Tour has something to do with that attitude-players don't have to worry about making the cut and playing next week. But they also don't worry about missing the green. They are fearless, because there is no such thing as an impossible recovery shot as far as they are concerned.

It used to be that if you faced a difficult bunker shot, you more or less conceded bogey. Not anymore. Now you have to find a wayto get the ball close or you lose a lot of ground to the field. So every player on Tour has improved his bunker play in the last several years, out of necessity. And it's the same with every other recovery shot.

Look at the PGA Tour statistics. The best player out here hits about 70 percent of the greens in regulation over the course of the season. When you get below the top 10, the numbers start sliding toward 60 percentpretty rapidly. That means most players are hitting between 10 and 13 greens a round. Yet everybody is shooting par or better -- those who aren't don't stay around very long. Which means they are getting it up and down a lot of times every day.

For one thing, we're playing much tougher courses these days-longer, more heavily bunkered, more difficult in all respects around the greens. That means we don't hit as many greens, so there is more need to make great recoveries. And that's fine with me. I like the trouble shots, especially the short ones, the little finesse shots, the shots you have to create to get the ball close enough for a makable putt. That's the greatest pleasure in the game as far as I'm concerned.

I think I'm a good competitor. And while I guess my swing is not classic, I think I can hit all the shots with the best of them. But my career has been as good as it has because of my short game. I'm in my twenty-seventh year on Tour, and what has kept me so highly competitive all these years has been my proficiency from 60 yards in.

After I won the U.S. Open at Shinnecock Hills in 1986, 1 went into a bit of a slump. There were a lot of demands on my time, and I let them take precedence over my golf game. I didn't allow enough time for practice. I particularly neglected my short game. The rest of my game remained relatively okay. I was driving the ball and hitting the irons as I normally do. But the recovery shots were not getting as close and the putts were not going in as often, so my scores were going up and my income was going down. This is not an excuse; it's a statement of fact. I had fallen down in the most important area of the game.

That's the dumbest thing I could have done, and I know better. I won the Open with my short game, on one day, in fact. In the opening round on Thursday we played in what may have been the worst weather I've ever encountered-cold, rainy, and the wind bowling on a course that had few trees for protection and is one of the world's most difficult. I had no feel whatsoever for the full shots and hit them terribly. I had a double-bogey and two unplayable lies during the round. I shot 75, and while that doesn't sound very good, that's the round that won the Championship for me. I finished only five shots behind the leader on a day when the average score was 78. 1. And mine could have been 85. 1 took only 25 putts. My pitching, chipping, and putting saved me.

In the 1988 PGA Championship at Oak Tree in Edmond, Oklahoma, I holed three chip shots during the first round, then made a near-impossible chip shot from the rough on the thirteenth hole for a birdie in the second round. I also made a 172-yard hole-in-one during the third round, but I guess we can't count that as a chip-in.

A streak like that is unusual, of course, but the point is that it made up for a lot of errors. I didn't win the championship, but those four chip shots holed made the difference between finishing tied for ninth with five others and tying for thirty -- first with seven others. It meant the difference between earning $21,500 and $4,842, which is a pretty big difference in anybody's paycheck. And it might have made an even bigger difference had I taken three shots to get down on any of them instead of being lucky enough to put them in the hole. And when I say lucky, I mean that there is of course a certain amount of luck in sinking a shot from off the green. But all were very good shots and would have finished around...

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)