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From a Basement in Seattle: The Poster Art of Brad Klausen
     

From a Basement in Seattle: The Poster Art of Brad Klausen

by Brad Klausen (Artist), Eddie Vedder (Introduction), Jeff Ament (Introduction)
 

"Klausen's left-field philosophies and twisted narratives beautifully underscore the stunning large-format artwork and contribute a greater depth of expression. A must-have for any music fan, artist, or aspiring graphic designer."
--Publishers Weekly, Starred Review, Pick of the Week

"The artist’s eclectic style choices, combined with a

Overview


"Klausen's left-field philosophies and twisted narratives beautifully underscore the stunning large-format artwork and contribute a greater depth of expression. A must-have for any music fan, artist, or aspiring graphic designer."
--Publishers Weekly, Starred Review, Pick of the Week

"The artist’s eclectic style choices, combined with a variety of computer-aided typefaces and hand-drawn graphics, make the posters exciting."
--Library Journal

"Stylized, suggestive, gorgeously composed, Klausen's art is the work of a metaphorist who sees the world from an admittedly skewed angle."
--The Seattle Times

An extensive look into the creative process through which artist Brad Klausen generates imagery for rock posters for Pearl Jam, Built to Spill, Queens of the Stone Age, and others. Included alongside the image of each finished poster are sketches and detailed commentary of the story behind the execution and concept of the individual designs.

Brad Klausen grew up in southern California and moved to Seattle in 1999 to begin a nine-year career as the in-house graphic designer for the world-famous rock band Pearl Jam. In July 2007 he launched Artillery Design, his one-man design shop where he continues to make posters for Pearl Jam, Built to Spill, Widespread Panic, and many other bands. He still lives in Seattle.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
This lush volume vibrantly documents the work of poster artist Brad Klausen from 2001 to the present day. From his appointment as in-house graphic designer for grunge luminaries Pearl Jam to the establishment of his own design studio nine years later, Klausen has crafted his own magnificent vision to promote established bands like Queens of the Stone Age and Soundgarden as well as emerging artists like MGMT and TV On The Radio. Klausen discusses the creative process behind every work, providing a fascinating evolution of changing ideas, motives, restrictions, and influences. The juxtaposition of early sounding board Eddie Vedder, a mercurial political and socio-economic climate, and Klausen's dutiful search for an "appropriate image for a given city'' form the basis of many a tour poster. Personal inspirations range from M. C. Escher to Evel Knievel and include all manner of mythology, fantasy, theology, psychology, pop culture and even recycled designs. Klausen's left-field philosophies and twisted narratives beautifully underscore the stunning large-format artwork and contribute a greater depth of expression. A must-have for any music fan, artist, or aspiring graphic designer. (Dec.)
Library Journal
Poster artist Klausen's portfolio is a reflection primarily of the work he has done for the rock group Pearl Jam. The book includes full-page color reproductions of Klausen's screen prints, as well as some of his preparatory pencil sketches. The examples are arranged chronologically and mostly accompany concert events. The artist's eclectic style choices, combined with a variety of computer-aided typefaces and hand-drawn graphics, make the posters exciting. However, Klausen's text suffers from lack of focus. The writing in the lengthy captions is colloquial and episodic and often digresses into political rants. The book would be improved if the caption under each poster were limited to a consistent topic, such as a description of the publicized event. The other included information about Klausen's artistic processes and political views would be better handled in separate essays and perhaps by different writers. VERDICT Although Klausen's art is better than his writing, this book will appeal to readers with an interest in music posters and especially to fans of Pearl Jam.—Eric Linderman, Euclid P.L., OH

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781936070671
Publisher:
Akashic Books
Publication date:
12/07/2010
Pages:
150
Sales rank:
1,345,231
Product dimensions:
10.60(w) x 12.40(h) x 0.60(d)

Read an Excerpt

FROM A BASEMENT IN SEATTLE

THE POSTER ART OF BRAD KLAUSEN
By Brad Klausen

Akashic Books

Copyright © 2010 Brad Klausen
All right reserved.

ISBN: 978-1-936070-67-1


Chapter One

D&L SCREENPRINTING

In the screenprinting world, there are two types of artists: those who print their own posters, and those who hire a printer. Printing one's own posters requires a number of complex elements: multiple large screens, emulsion, exposure unit, washout booth, pressure washer, vacuum table, drying racks, large-format printer for film, stacks of large sheets of paper, homemade or automated press, squeegees, paper guillotine, a rainbow of different buckets of ink, ample space for storage, printing, and drying, a tremendous amount of diligence, and-most important of all—time.

I've always been envious of the artists who print their own work. They can experiment on the fly with colors and overprinting, changing things up as they go. All things which they can then factor into how they are going to design future posters. At the same time I am envious of them for that, I don't understand at all how they have the time to not only work on the designs, but to then go through the many steps of the printing process.

Luckily for me, one of the best screenprinters in the country happens to be located in my neighborhood. Justin Hampton turned me on to D&L back in 2005, and with the exception of about five posters, they've printed all the images in this book. They are integral to the look and feel of my work. The guys at D&L never cease to amaze me in their ability to not only crank out high-quality posters, but to then deal with the various quirks and peculiarities of the array of artists who they print for. This roster of artists includes some of the biggest names in the rock poster world: Emek, Jermaine Rogers, Justin Hampton, Rob Jones, Todd Slater, Daniel Danger, and Tyler Stout, to name just a few. Over the years that I've been working with D&L, it seems like the majority of poster artists out here have had their work pulled through D&L's screens. They are a major hub of the screenprinting world, and their handiwork is rightly hanging on walls all across the globe.

I am beyond grateful for all the hard work that D&L has put into printing my posters over the past six years, and I can't thank them enough for always putting up with me.

D&L Screenprinting is: Steve Horvath, Cary Holt, Jason Hunt, Pete Jay, Josh Dieters, Jon Smith, and Odulia Horvath.

Brad Klausen Seattle, Washington September 2010

This was my very first poster, and was an offset print rather than a screenprint. Jeff Ament told me one day about a design concept he had for the Joint Artists and Music Promotions Political Action Committee's (JAMPAC) push to make low-power radio legal and thus allow for more voices to be heard on the airwaves.

Jeff described his concept and asked if I would bring it to life. Originally, he imagined a big boot of the FCC hanging over a one-man band.

I adapted the head image I had previously used for some of Pearl Jam's merchandise from the Binaural tour, and stuck it on the body of our one-man band/radio station. The pencil drawing was then run through the Photoshop "cutout" filter to create the effect of the final image. My friend Blake had just turned me on to this effect, and I was using it on everything. At this early stage, I was mostly focused on using the computer to design, and wasn't really drawing very much by hand.

During a period of my life where I would say I was stuck in quite a rut, wallowing in depression, my sister threw out the suggestion that I should take a class. Do something other than just sit around being unhappy. This sounded like a good idea. So after I hung up the phone with Lauren, I went online and looked up what classes the Seattle School of Visual Concepts had to offer. Much to my surprise, there was a poster design class being taught by Jeff Kleinsmith. I couldn't believe it. Jeff is one of my favorite artists and has been a huge influence on my desire to make posters. I had been wanting to get into designing screenprints for years, and now one of the godfathers of the genre happened to be teaching a class in my town. This is the poster I designed for that class. Little did I know then the impact the class would have on my life. I am forever in debt to Jeff and to my sister for changing the direction of my life.

(Continues...)



Excerpted from FROM A BASEMENT IN SEATTLE by Brad Klausen Copyright © 2010 by Brad Klausen. Excerpted by permission of Akashic Books. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Meet the Author


Brad Klausen: Brad Klausen grew up in Southern California and moved to Seattle in 1999 to begin a nine-year career as the in-house graphic designer for the world-famous rock band Pearl Jam. In July 2007 he launched Artillery Design, his one-man design shop where he continues to make posters for Pearl Jam, Built to Spill, Widespread Panic, and many other bands. He lives in Seattle.

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