From Another World

Overview

Rosario had no shadow. I remember noticing this very clearly and telling myself that I didn't need to have goose bumps. This wasn't important. Peter Pan didn't have a shadow, either, and he was a good guy. But I couldn't take my eyes off the wall, as if I were staring at a movie on a big screen. The light from the candle cast shadows from all four of us. But it went right through Rosario…
Read More Show Less
... See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (11) from $1.99   
  • New (4) from $4.45   
  • Used (7) from $1.99   
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

Rosario had no shadow. I remember noticing this very clearly and telling myself that I didn't need to have goose bumps. This wasn't important. Peter Pan didn't have a shadow, either, and he was a good guy. But I couldn't take my eyes off the wall, as if I were staring at a movie on a big screen. The light from the candle cast shadows from all four of us. But it went right through Rosario…
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
One of Brazil's best known writers mixes magical realism with history to tell about the evils of slavery. Narrator Mariano finds reading "boring and tiring," but becomes "slave to a promise made to a ghost" who orders him to write down her story so it will not be forgotten. Mariano and his friends encounter Rosario, while helping their parents convert an old coffee plantation into an inn. Before the first guests arrive, the four kids test-drive a building they refer to as "The Annex," but which they learn was once the senzala-the slave quarters. During their first sleepover, they hear pitiful crying. On the next visit, a storm cuts the power and a lit candle brings Rosario into their presence. Gradually, she shares her horrific biography. Born free to enslaved parents, she lived to learn of Princess Isabel's 1888 law abolishing slavery, but the cruel master who owned her parents made sure they never got to taste freedom. Rosario has haunted the scene of her family's death ever since, waiting to speak. Machado's message is nicely balanced with Mariano's na ve voice. "Writers have no rest," he complains after hearing a new detail he'll have to add to the story. By the end, he's figured out that knowledge of the past is important to understanding the present. Brandao's half-tone illustrations, interspersed throughout the narrative, are as gentle as Rosario's death is rough. Ages 8-11. (Apr.) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
School Library Journal
Gr 5-8-Mariano's mother and her best friend have decided to turn an old historic country homestead into an inn. When Mariano and his friends stay the night, they discover that the annex is haunted by a girl about their age who had been the slave of a cruel master in the late 1800s. She eventually begins communicating with them and telling the story of her death. The kids want to help free her from her misery so they each promise to help find out what happened to her long-lost brother, and Mariano is chosen to write down her story. Some of the author's original mood must have been lost in translation because the book gets off to a very slow start and the dialogue is quite choppy. Mariano's speech pivots from sounding like a babbling child to a mature adult later on, making it difficult to determine his age. But once the premise is revealed, the novel takes on a faster pace and offers a fascinating picture of Brazil's culture and history, cleverly wrapped in a ghost story.-Kimberly Monaghan, formerly at Vernon Area Public Library, IL Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
When Mariano's mother and friend decide to restore and convert an old plantation house into an inn, the ghostly apparition of Rosario, a slave child from the previous century, brings to light a story of cruel mass murder in 19th-century Brazil. With three friends, Leo, Elisa and Tere, Mariano experiences a series of seance visits during the late night hours as Rosario tells them the history of her family and how the laws overturning slavery caused their cruel master to lock his slaves in a burning barn rather than grant them freedom. Only her little brother Amaro escaped and it turns out he became the only heir to the plantation. Rosario wants the truth recorded and remembered and requests Mariano write it down. Told in the first person from the boy's point of view, the "visits" slowly piece together the slave child's mysterious bits of information later verified by Leo's grandmother. Translated from the Portuguese, this Hans Christian Andersen award winner weaves together a mildly enigmatic yet unexciting plot that purports themes of freedom and justice accompanied by slightly cubist-style charcoal or pastel drawings. (Fiction. 10-12)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780888996411
  • Publisher: Groundwood Books
  • Publication date: 2/9/2006
  • Edition description: Translatio
  • Pages: 128
  • Sales rank: 837,362
  • Age range: 9 - 12 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.00 (w) x 7.40 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)