From Appomattox to Montmartre: Americans and the Paris Commune / Edition 206

Hardcover (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $31.97
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 54%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (6) from $31.97   
  • New (2) from $67.35   
  • Used (4) from $31.97   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$67.35
Seller since 2007

Feedback rating:

(23160)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
BRAND NEW

Ships from: Avenel, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$67.45
Seller since 2009

Feedback rating:

(9531)

Condition: New
New Book. Shipped from US within 4 to 14 business days. Established seller since 2000

Ships from: Secaucus, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by

Overview

The American Civil War and the Paris Commune of 1871, Philip Katz argues, were part of the broader sweep of transatlantic development in the mid-nineteenth century--an age of democratic civil wars. Katz shows how American political culture in the period that followed the Paris Commune was shaped by that event.

The telegraph, the new Atlantic cable, and the news-gathering experience gained in the Civil War transformed the Paris Commune into an American national event. News from Europe arrived in fragments, however, and was rarely cohesive and often contradictory. Americans were forced to assimilate the foreign events into familiar domestic patterns, most notably the Civil War. Two ways of Americanizing the Commune emerged: descriptive (recasting events in American terms in order to better understand them) and predictive (preoccupation with whether Parisian unrest might reproduce itself in the United States).

By 1877, the Commune became a symbol for the domestic labor unrest that culminated in the Great Railroad Strike of that year. As more powerful local models of social unrest emerged, however, the Commune slowly disappeared as an active force in American culture.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Harvard University<br> Patrice Higonnet
Katz's book is highly interesting for many reasons. For one, it says quite a lot that is wholly new about both French and American political history. The stories of Empress Eugénie's dentist, Ambassador Washburne's memoirs, and Cluseret's stay in America are well known, but before I read this book, I did not realize how extensive and sustained was the involvement of Americans in the Paris Commune. I was intrigued also by Professor Katz's presentation of American reactions to French events: because the Commune was both an anti-centralist statement and a revolutionary movement, it elicited dramatically contradictory responses; and it is startling to learn that some ex-Confederates had positive things to say about a social movement whose libertarian relevance to the cause of their worst enemies was also obvious. This is an informative book, well and clearly written.
Civil War History

Katz, who has done a careful and extremely detailed study of the Americanization of the meanings of the Commune, is to be applauded for his originality; analyzing the interpolation of overseas events into American politics is a relatively unexplored and worthwhile avenue…Katz shows how complex events are sorted out over time, how verbal brickbats are constructed, and how Americans are eternally reluctant to see class war as internal to their own exceptionalist history.
— Michael Fellman

Left History

From Appomattox To Montmartre is well worth reading. It takes a significant step towards de-exceptionalizing U. S. history, both by situating it in an international context and by addressing just how exceptional nineteenth-century Americans (especially bourgeois Americans) considered themselves.
— Kristin Hoganson

The Journal Of American History

Katz's idea-that American interpretations of the Commune reflected confusion about the nation's postwar national role-is exciting…From Appomattox to Montmartre is a welcome resurrection of the nineteenth- century American obsession with the Paris Commune.
— Heather Cox Richardson

University of Nebraska-Lincoln James A. Rawley
What Katz has done is quite remarkable...His study surpasses previous work by the breadth and depth of his research...He displays considerable analytical powers in evaluating his materials, demonstrating how diverse groups responded to what he terms 'an ideological jumble.' ...The most substantial study yet written on the Paris Commune and the United States...Katz has made a contribution to social, cultural, and intellectual history.
Patrice Higonnet
Katz's book is highly interesting for many reasons. For one, it says quite a lot that is wholly new about both French and American political history. The stories of Empress Eugénie's dentist, Ambassador Washburne's memoirs, and Cluseret's stay in America are well known, but before I read this book, I did not realize how extensive and sustained was the involvement of Americans in the Paris Commune. I was intrigued also by Professor Katz's presentation of American reactions to French events: because the Commune was both an anti-centralist statement and a revolutionary movement, it elicited dramatically contradictory responses; and it is startling to learn that some ex-Confederates had positive things to say about a social movement whose libertarian relevance to the cause of their worst enemies was also obvious. This is an informative book, well and clearly written.
Civil War History - Michael Fellman
Katz, who has done a careful and extremely detailed study of the Americanization of the meanings of the Commune, is to be applauded for his originality; analyzing the interpolation of overseas events into American politics is a relatively unexplored and worthwhile avenue…Katz shows how complex events are sorted out over time, how verbal brickbats are constructed, and how Americans are eternally reluctant to see class war as internal to their own exceptionalist history.
Left History - Kristin Hoganson
From Appomattox To Montmartre is well worth reading. It takes a significant step towards de-exceptionalizing U. S. history, both by situating it in an international context and by addressing just how exceptional nineteenth-century Americans (especially bourgeois Americans) considered themselves.
The Journal Of American History - Heather Cox Richardson
Katz's idea-that American interpretations of the Commune reflected confusion about the nation's postwar national role-is exciting…From Appomattox to Montmartre is a welcome resurrection of the nineteenth- century American obsession with the Paris Commune.
James A. Rawley
What Katz has done is quite remarkable...His study surpasses previous work by the breadth and depth of his research...He displays considerable analytical powers in evaluating his materials, demonstrating how diverse groups responded to what he terms 'an ideological jumble.' ...The most substantial study yet written on the Paris Commune and the United States...Katz has made a contribution to social, cultural, and intellectual history.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780674323483
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • Publication date: 12/28/1998
  • Series: Harvard Historical Studies Series , #131
  • Edition number: 206
  • Pages: 286
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Philip M. Katz is Assistant Director of Research for the American Association of Museums
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction: An Epoch of Stirring Events 1
1 The Two Civil Wars of General Cluseret 4
2 La Colonie Americaine 26
3 First Impressions 44
4 Ripples across the Atlantic 61
5 Civil Wars by Analogy: Party, Section, and the Paris Commune 85
6 The View from the 1870s 118
7 Apocalypse Where? Apocalypse When? 142
8 1877: The Rise of the American Commune? 161
Conclusion: That Once Dreaded Institution 184
App. A Chronology of the Paris Commune 195
App. B Two American Poems about the Paris Commune 197
App. C Novels and Plays about the Paris Commune 201
Notes 207
Index 269
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)