From Binge to Blackout: A Mother and Son Struggle With Teen Drinking [NOOK Book]

Overview

Throughout his college years, Toren Volkmann partied like there was no tomorrow, having what was supposed to be the time of his life. Like so many parents, his mother, Chris, overlooked Toren’s growing alcohol problem. But when he graduated, Toren realized he’d become a full-blown alcoholic. And he was not alone.


Considered a rite of passage, teenage drinking has skyrocketed to epidemic proportions, fostering a generation of young adults whose lives are already beginning to ...

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From Binge to Blackout: A Mother and Son Struggle With Teen Drinking

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Overview

Throughout his college years, Toren Volkmann partied like there was no tomorrow, having what was supposed to be the time of his life. Like so many parents, his mother, Chris, overlooked Toren’s growing alcohol problem. But when he graduated, Toren realized he’d become a full-blown alcoholic. And he was not alone.


Considered a rite of passage, teenage drinking has skyrocketed to epidemic proportions, fostering a generation of young adults whose lives are already beginning to come apart under the strain. This book, written from the viewpoints of both mother and son, is a riveting, enlightening, and heartbreakingly true story of a family that was able to confront the fear, pain, and denial that threatened to destroy them—and survive the epidemic of teenage drinking that’s putting America’s future at risk.




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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
Chris Volkmann was proud of Toren, the youngest of her three "golden boy" sons. Sure, he drank too much, but he didn't seem much different from any of those other college guys looking for any excuse to party. It was only after graduation -- and that terrifying phone call -- that Chris realized that her beloved little boy was a now a full-grown alcoholic spiraling out of control. This memoir of a shared descent into hell was written from the viewpoints of both mother and son.
New York Times
From Binge to Blackout: a Mother and Son Struggle with Teen Drinking is an especially gripping cautionary tale on this subject. And it is unusual in that it does not follow the standard story template, from downfall to miracle cure. Instead this account is divided between two narrators: Toren Volkmann, who slid with scary ease from fun-loving party guy to desperate alcoholic, and Chris Volkmann, his mother, who bought Toren's assurances that he was fine. He had a secret, and she hadn't a clue.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781101210727
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 8/1/2006
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 432
  • Sales rank: 262,039
  • File size: 605 KB

Meet the Author

Chris Volkmann, a former classroom teacher, lives in Olympia, Washington. Chris stepped away from her career to parent three sons. She attended Toren’s college graduation having no clue her son was part of a not-so-hidden epidemic. She shares what every parent thinks but cannot always say.
Toren Volkmann (BA in psychology, former Peace Corps volunteer) lives one day at a time after successfully completing rehab and a six-month residence in a Florida halfway house.

Chris Volkmann, a former classroom teacher, lives in Olympia, Washington. Chris stepped away from her career to parent three sons. She attended Toren’s college graduation having no clue her son was part of a not-so-hidden epidemic. She shares what every parent thinks but cannot always say.
Toren Volkmann (BA in psychology, former Peace Corps volunteer) lives one day at a time after successfully completing rehab and a six-month residence in a Florida halfway house.

Chris Volkmann, a former classroom teacher, lives in Olympia, Washington. Chris stepped away from her career to parent three sons. She attended Toren’s college graduation having no clue her son was part of a not-so-hidden epidemic. She shares what every parent thinks but cannot always say.
Toren Volkmann (BA in psychology, former Peace Corps volunteer) lives one day at a time after successfully completing rehab and a six-month residence in a Florida halfway house.

Chris Volkmann, a former classroom teacher, lives in Olympia, Washington. Chris stepped away from her career to parent three sons. She attended Toren’s college graduation having no clue her son was part of a not-so-hidden epidemic. She shares what every parent thinks but cannot always say.
Toren Volkmann (BA in psychology, former Peace Corps volunteer) lives one day at a time after successfully completing rehab and a six-month residence in a Florida halfway house.

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Read an Excerpt

Chris p. 10- The End at the Beginning
When I left for the market earlier that day, my son was living in Paraguay working for the Peace Corps. By the time I returned home to put the groceries away, he’d become an alcoholic headed for rehab. So what happened between the produce aisle and my driveway?

Toren p. 21- My Drink
Even more disturbing are the terrible physical reactions, depending on the amount of alcohol I consumed and my eventual detox. This is the big problem. During detox, inside the unsettled body, a nervous and sometimes nauseous sense begins…an anxiety and almost a fear, like being too alone. You see yourself and everything differently. Like a sudden collapse of the stock market in your brain and every single nerve ending throughout your body wants to turn inside out and puke out some unidentifiable pain or itch. You sweat, and you sweat increasingly when you let unreasonable thoughts trick you into feeling like whatever you are thinking must be true, like for example, “this is normal,” “this will never end,” “I deserve this,” or “hhhhmm…maybe another drink will solve the problem.”

Chris p. 79- Put on Your Beer Goggles and Don’t Ask Why
Binge drinking looks fun and blurs the reality of what really happens when thousands of kids drink way too much. And all the while, we parents are blind. Maybe that’s because we’re busy sipping wine as we bid at fund-raisers, or we’re knocking back a few tall cold ones at our alumni tailgate parties, or maybe we’re out to a two-martini dinner with intimate friends while our successful kids are tucked away on campuses where fun can’t be categorized as dangerous. Or progressive. Or addictive.

Toren p. 132-133 –Party My Face Off
Were all these classy visits to other campuses rehearsals for my behavioral outbursts during my college freshman year? Hell no. I was just getting my green feet wet and still learning the ropes. There was no problem. I was still in high school. Relax. (And don’t think, Gee, man, it sure is surprising that no one ever pulled you aside and said, ‘You know, I think some of these things are pretty scary. Maybe you have a problem and should think about getting help.’) No, it’s not surprising that never happened, because most of these things went under the radar of any counselor, authority, and more important, the parents. You think I went home, and when asked, “Hey, Toren, how was your night last night?,” that I responded, “Oh, it was great. I drank a forty in under five minutes, we made a double-funnel beer bong, we outran the cops, and later, I blacked out and woke up in a strange bathroom with my pants on inside out. How was yours?” Never. There was always a normal activity or at least a smoothed-over version of what we were up to, the imaginary side of the coin of my perfect teenager life. There was no friend of mine who would suggest to another that anyone had a problem, because it was all too early and too fun. What could possibly go wrong in our worlds?

Chris p. 246- What Parents Can Do
Within our family, we now have the courage to talk about high-risk drinking. It’s easily discussed because the disease is with us. Drinking is now considered as dangerous as a bad sunburn—a weekend souvenir that begins as a haunting cancer and can progress to death.

Toren p. 168—In Descent
I imagined myself sliding on my knees across the hard floor into the middle of the circle with my fists clenched in the air, screaming for some sort of relief…but of course I stayed at the edge of the circle, adamant that no one would know about the war being waged inside me. I remember looking at a couple of the people as they stood in the circle and desperately thinking, Maybe they are having problems, too, like me. But then, I thought, These people have no clue what it is like to experience the difficulties that I have.

Chris p. 278- Warning Label
It has been said that “Alcohol is so potent that, if discovered today, it would be classified as a Class II drug, available only by prescription.” [Wright & Wright] Adults who willingly provide minors with alcohol often think they are doing them a favor, especially when it occurs within the confines of a private home. But in fact, providing young people with alcohol can contribute to violence, driving under the influence, sexual assault, and binge drinking. By allowing underage drinking, parents are sending the message that it’s okay to drink. Parents may not be able to control actions of intoxicated youth once they have left a party, or even within the confines of the home. Car crashes and injuries following parent-hosted parties are a huge risk, and parents can be held liable for these incidents. Recent information about the susceptibility of adolescents to severe damage from heavy drinking causes me to stop and reconsider attitudes about serving alcohol to underage kids. Collecting car keys and allowing minors to party in the basement may be more detrimental than most parents realize, even without considering destruction caused to the adolescent brain. Which of we parents wishes to be responsible not only for destroying cells in our children’s still-forming intellects but for the crashes, sexual incidents, and violence brought on by underage abuse of alcohol?

Toren p.173- Progression Without Progress
When I came to again I was shivering and lying face down on the hard bus terminal floor near a wall. I was still in Asunción and it was early the next morning. A security guard was inspecting me as if I were crazy. He must have noticed me passed out. Hungover, dirty and ragged, I’m sure I looked like a total street bum. The plastic bottle, now empty, had fallen out of my pocket. I didn’t know how long I had been there. I still had my ticket but had missed my bus.

Chris p. 338 – Moving On to Gravy
Of all the points to consider about heavy teen drinking, I am most struck by the fact that oftentimes young drinkers and their parents don’t realize they are in trouble until too late. It can be after college graduation that symptoms become pronounced, just at the time when an emerging adult begins to seek out lifelong goals. Abusive alcohol consumption is associated with alcohol-related problems after graduation which can permanently affect achievement of a young person’s dreams and aspirations. As with Toren and our family, the results of this continual abuse will finally stack up until it falls with crushing force onto our heads.

Toren p. 348- Could You Spare Me Some Change, Please?
Some friends have said things along the lines of, “I think it’s cool what you’re doing…but I could never go that route…I could never go straight-edge, completely sober.” I used to think that exact way, too. It really comes down to the fact that this is the only direction I can go if I want to have a seminormal, productive life. And for now, that sounds like something I should want, right? I don’t want to be enslaved to toxins that disconnect me further from living. That’s where I was when I was last drinking. So I can mirror similar sentiments to those friends of mine respectively: “I think it’s cool that you still drink and use drugs…but I can’t go down that road…it would destroy me.”

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 12 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 12 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 8, 2012

    very good cause and effect book about the short and long run issues of alcohol !

    This book about Toren Volkmann's life and how he started to drink in high school is very interesting and makes teens more aware of the serious issues that alcohol can bring not only in the short run, but the long run as well. The mother and son did a great job in writing this book by providing the audience an example from their own experiences.
    Toren began drinking when he was in high school and was caught by a cop at a party. He faced legal consequences and faced a very strict life at home. During his years at high school, toren did receive good grades which his mother demanded as part of his punishment of drinking alcohol. however, Toren was kicked off his sports teams due to his usage of alcohol. His mother denied the idea that her youngest son was an alcohol...and Toren denied the idea as well.
    The story teaches ways to prevent teens from abusing alcohol and talks about the rising amount of underage drinking. at first it does not seem like a big issue and many people stress the practice of abstinence, because the short term effects are extremely negative, but as the teenager drinks more frequently, he/she will become dependent and feel the urge to have alcohol. The effects of alcohol is very negative during adolescent and how there is a much greater chance of becoming addicting.
    In FROM BINGE TO BLACKOUT, Toren does not realize his huge dependency of alcohol until after he graduates. He was recommended to visit Alcoholics Anonomyous while in college, but blew it off, which is his biggest regret. In the end, Toren ends up in a rehab center to help aid him in diminishing his addicition.
    i will recommend this book for teenagers who have thought about drinking or do consume alcohol, because it teaches the consequences of abusing alcohol.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 7, 2012

    A student's perspective

    As a student who is still learning from personal mistakes and gaining more knowledge as I grow, this book helps open my eyes to the impact any decision I make can have on the rest of my life. The idea of drinking, partying, and involvement with drugs throughout the book shows the severity these actions can have. Decisions are constantly being made in the book, Both Toren and Chris are confronted with controversial issues in society today, and this novel explores how they handle themselves in certain situations.
    Obviously teen drinking is an issue that Toren involves him with. He never truly understands the consequences of using alcohol at such a young age. His adolescence is at risk, not only does he get in trouble with the law (which could have affected his success in the future), but is also harmful to his mental and physical being as well. As Toren grows older he becomes even more involved with drugs and alcohol to a point where he is dependent on it, has withdrawals without it, and needs it to function. His relationship with alcohol throughout the book shows that personal decisions are crucial, that one cannot blame others for their faults, but learn from mistakes and move on in order to become a better person.
    Toren also had his mother Chris to help guide him in the right direction. She was there for him through his mistakes in high school, believed he was making good choices in college, and enjoyed casual drinks with her boys when they were old enough. She would harshly punish her sons for their faults involving alcohol in high school, and tried to be the best mother she could. Though she struggled internally to have the perfect family, her wish did not always come true. Throughout the story she thinks of the past and wonders of things she would do differently, but generally did a fine job raising her boys.
    The book is written by both the mother and son who went through this tragic experience. They both recollect on past experiences and wonder what a difference it made to their lives. This book also contains guides and helpful tips to those who are concerned about others or their own addiction with misusing alcohol. This book mainly speaks of alcoholism, but also talks of how this disease affects the alcoholic and those around them. Personally this book is a great way to learn about the consequences poor choices and misusing drugs/ alcohol can lead to.

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  • Posted October 28, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Reviewed by Jennifer Wardrip, aka "The Genius" for TeensReadToo.com

    I think it would be safe to say that, for the majority of teens at least, drinking (and by this I mean consuming alcoholic beverages) is something that will come up sooner rather than later. Seen by many as a "right of passage," teens and alcohol are things that seem to go hand in hand. Although I know this isn't true for every teen--I myself never had a drop of alcohol until I was twenty-one, due to a strict upbringing--what I remember from my high school years, and what I see today among teens, shows that teen drinking is on the rise. <BR/><BR/>What many teens don't realize, and quite possibly don't even understand, is that due to their actual adolescence and the changes that brings, their bodies are actually at risk to suffer greater negative effects from alcohol. Sure, it can give you a buzz, and in some social circles there are even those who will say it makes you look cool. The problem is, that just like with the nicotine in cigarettes and the unhealthy substances in marijuana and other illegal drugs, that the changing bodies of teens can be harmed to a greater extent than those of full-grown adults. <BR/><BR/>FROM BINGE TO BLACKOUT is the story of Toren Volkmann and his mother, Chris. Toren was like any teen, one who experimented with alcohol in ways that didn't, at first, prove to be a problem. Unfortunately, this experimentation later led to full-blown blackouts and an eventual stay in a rehab center for alcohol addiction. <BR/><BR/>This is a book that is part autobiography, part scientific text, part guidebook. You'll find the warning signs of teen drinking, references to places that can help you both as a drinker and a family member affected by someone who is a drinker, and questions that can help you talk about alcohol dependency. This is the perfect book not just for parents, but also for teens who struggle with an alcohol problem--or even those who don't yet, but realize they could be on that path. This is a touching, heartwarming story that ended, thankfully, with recovery. Unfortunately, many more teens might not be as lucky as Toren Volkmann was, and those are the ones who really need to pick up a copy of FROM BINGE TO BLACKOUT.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 21, 2007

    a reviewer

    I think it would be safe to say that, for the majority of teens at least, drinking (and by this I mean consuming alcoholic beverages) is something that will come up sooner rather than later. Seen by many as a 'right of passage,' teens and alcohol are things that seem to go hand in hand. Although I know this isn't true for every teen--I myself never had a drop of alcohol until I was twenty-one, due to a strict upbringing--what I remember from my high school years, and what I see today among teens, shows that teen drinking is on the rise. What many teens don't realize, and quite possibly don't even understand, is that due to their actual adolescence and the changes that brings, their bodies are actually at risk to suffer greater negative effects from alcohol. Sure, it can give you a buzz, and in some social circles there are even those who will say it makes you look cool. The problem is, that just like with the nicotine in cigarettes and the unhealthy substances in marijuana and other illegal drugs, that the changing bodies of teens can be harmed to a greater extent than those of full-grown adults. FROM BINGE TO BLACKOUT is the story of Toren Volkmann and his mother, Chris. Toren was like any teen, one who experimented with alcohol in ways that didn't, at first, prove to be a problem. Unfortunately, this experimentation later led to full-blown blackouts and an eventual stay in a rehab center for alcohol addiction. This is a book that is part autobiography, part scientific text, part guidebook. You'll find the warning signs of teen drinking, references to places that can help you both as a drinker and a family member affected by someone who is a drinker, and questions that can help you talk about alcohol dependency. This is the perfect book not just for parents, but also for teens who struggle with an alcohol problem--or even those who don't yet, but realize they could be on that path. This is a touching, heartwarming story that ended, thankfully, with recovery. Unfortunately, many more teens might not be as lucky as Toren Volkmann was, and those are the ones who really need to pick up a copy of FROM BINGE TO BLACKOUT. **Reviewed by: Jennifer Wardrip, aka 'The Genius'

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 7, 2006

    A great read

    This book should be a part of every family's library, a gift from concerned grandparents, a required read for college freshmen, on every teacher's desk, a fun airplane read, a part of every treatment center and a mainstay in the armamentarium of those who counsel youth. It was recommended to me by a friend. Although drinking and drugs have not been an issue for me and my family, I decided to take it with me on a trip. Once I started reading it, I could not put it down. Several people at the airport asked me where to get a copy. It uniquely tells the story from both the viewpoint of the kid and the mom in a fascinating style of writing--- most compelling. And the book costs less than a 6-pack!!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 8, 2006

    All the elements of a fantastic read are here!

    As someone who has experienced the wrath of addiction up close and personally in family members ¿ as have most of us ¿ and been disappointed in the lack of personal stories focused on recovery, communication and scope of the issue, I was at first skeptical of this book when I read about it in a People magazine feature recently I doubted its substantiality. But I was won over within just a few pages. This educational and readable work is the real deal. Attributes I noticed as I screamed through this page-turner: -The powerful storytelling of ¿A Million Little Pieces,¿ but without the fictional embellishment. -The useful information of ¿Buzzed,¿ but without the scholastic yawns. -The power of self-help ala ¿Chicken Soup for the Soul,¿ but without the tiring broth. -The compelling storyline of a mother and son struggling then acting so courageously and strong that it couldn¿t have been dreamed up. -The brutal honesty in taking head-on one of the major health problems in our society. -The foresight to begin dismantling an epidemic in the making. This one is going to make a difference!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 17, 2006

    Honest Compelling Educational

    I wish I had had this book when I was raising my teenage daughters. It's a riviting read that doesn't preach and certainly doesn't side step the lure that alcohol has for our society. This mother and son present the honest, compelling journey that one family takes when alcoholism strikes their youngest child. I read this book over a two day period a couple of weeks ago and haven't been able to stop thinking or talking about it since. I have given several copies as gifts and am anxious to talk with my friends and family members as they finish it. In fact, I think the very best thing about this book is the invitation it offers us to discuss a topic that is often complicated, misunderstood, and even taboo. Thank you Chris and Toren for courageously lifting the curtain on this very important health issue.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 17, 2006

    Excellent for parents and teens

    I also bought the book after hearing Toren and Chris on a talk show. I grew up as a nerd and never saw drinking or drugs with my group of friends. Now I have a teenager of my own. I am afraid that he and his friends are now drinking. This book gives me some insight into their thought process (or lack of it). It also provides help for parents. I found the resources very useful. I am going to suggest to our high school that the Torens come and speak to both our teens and their parents. It's a scary and dangerous time and I am grateful for any help!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 15, 2006

    A must-read for young drinkers and parents!

    I finished reading this book a week and a half ago and haven't gotten it out of my mind since. It was absolutely captivating. I love the way it isn't 'preachy' but has such raw honesty on both Toren and Chris's parts...and I'm grateful for all the resources listed for people looking for help. I can only imagine how many lives this outstanding work will touch. After seeing them on 'The View' I originally bought two copies but went back to buy three more as gifts for friends I know will want to read it. I was interested in it from the 'Mom's point of view' but as a Mom I love knowing how kids view their choices in life and what's really going on in their minds. This book tells it like it is.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 4, 2006

    The wake-up call book for families

    Here is a book for everyone. No matter who you are, what status you¿ve attained, or how much money you make, someday your going to know someone who has a major drinking/substance problem, maybe even your kids. From Binge to Blackout follows the story of Toren Volkmann, his alcoholism, and how his family sifts through the past to piece together a plan of attack. Amid their story are invaluable facts and figures about the growing epidemic of teen drinking, alcoholism, and what can be done to protect your family and friends. As a young man who has done my fair share of drinking, this was the wake-up call book for me. As I read Toren¿s story the congruencies in my story and his mounted to my dismay. It was from this point on that I was no longer a twenty-something having a good time, but guarded in my alcohol abuse, aware that something destructive was looming in my life. While my drinking hasn¿t reached the level of severity as Toren¿s, the book has led me to reevaluate how I seek out my ¿fun.¿ My whole family has read and discussed From Binge to Blackout. Parents need to read this book when their kids turn 12, the kids should read it at 14, and they should all read it again at 18. It could save lives and wasted years in the bottle.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 31, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 11, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

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