BN.com Gift Guide

From Bondage to Contract: Wage Labor, Marriage, and the Market in the Age of Slave Emancipation / Edition 1

Paperback (Print)
Buy New
Buy New from BN.com
$34.19
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $19.98
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 45%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (18) from $19.98   
  • New (9) from $21.95   
  • Used (9) from $19.98   

Overview

This book explores the centrality of contract to debates over freedom and slavery in nineteenth-century America. It focuses on the contracts of wage labor and marriage, investigating the connections between abolition in the South and industrial capitalism in the North and linking labor relations to home life. Integrating the fields of gender and legal, intellectual and social history, it reveals how abolitionists, former slaves, feminists, laborers, lawmakers and others drew on contract to condemn chattel slavery and to measure the virtues of free society.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Amy Dru Stanley's From Bondage to Contract is a transformative reinterpretation of American public life in late nineteenth century America, a triumph of the historical imagination and a profound reflection on contractualism as a moral and political discourse. Stanley's subject is contractualism at its moment of triumph, after slave emancipation. And her narrative explores points of tension and conflict in the moral universe in which 'freedom of contract' apparently reigned supreme: labor relations, marriage reform, begging and vagrancy, and prostitution. Her contractualism is never a conceptual monolith; From Bondage to Contract delineates many differing and competing contractualist reponses to the radically changed moral and economic universe that late nineteenth century Americans confronted." Hendrik Hartog, Class of 1921 Bicentennial Professor of the History of American Law and Liberty at Princeton University

"Brilliantly researched and skillfully argued, this is a work that transcends genres and subdisciplines, one that historians of gender, of labor, of poverty, legal historians, historians of political thought, public choice theorists, not to mention everybody who identifies as a liberal or a libertarian, will have to confront." Hendrik Hartog, Class of 1921 Bicentennial Professor of the History of American Law and Liberty at Princeton University

"Stanley analyzes how Americans 'reconsidered the meaning of freedom after slavery's downfall,' emphasizing the 'ambiguities of wage labor and marriage in a society that counted itself free because it had replaced bondage with contract.' Throughout, Stanley seeks to show how perceptions of the problems of the postemancipation South shaped the tone and content of public discussions on all of the above issues. This cleanly written study contributes to intellectual, labor, and women's history. Upper-division undergraduates and above." Choice

"[Stanley] has written a beutiful narrative describing the many shades of meaning that have been heaped on the term 'contract' over the years in the context of slavery, wage labor, vagrancy, prostitution, and coverture. She displays a masterful knowledge of the literature about contract in these widely differing situations and fully explores various types of contractual relations, as well as the tensions between alternative views of contract. She is indefatigable in pointing out the inconsistencies committed by various pundits in their often self-serving use of the term." Journal of Economic History

"[This] study reveals the centrality of contract theory to nineteenth-century debates about slavery, free labor, and marriage." The Historian

"...highly original, surprising and informative...a rare find...particularly rich in detail..." Daniel Hamilton, H-Net Reviews

"Amy Dru Stanley has produced an important contribution to the understanding of the place and position of women and slaves within American society during the nineteenth century." Solomon K. Smith, Southern Historian

"Amy Dru Stanley has written a fascinating and complex account of the various ways in which northern reformers applied notions of contract law to social problems that emerged in post-Civil War America." The North Carolina Historical Review

"Grounded in form scholarship based on extensive research, the author does not overstep the bounds of what can be gleaned from the sources...Stanley is to be commended further for an excellent job of dealing with complex ideologies and presenting them in such an accessible manner. Aimed at a scholarly audience, this book will appeal to a wide group, including labor and gender historians, as well as scholars of Reconstruction and industrialization." Historian, Sharon A. Roger Hepburn, Radford University

"...excellent and provocative study...

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780521635264
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication date: 11/28/1998
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 277
  • Product dimensions: 5.98 (w) x 8.98 (h) x 0.67 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface; 1. Legends of contract freedom; 2. Merchants of time: the labor question and the sale of self; 3. Beggars can't be choosers; 4. The testing ground of home life; 5. Wage labor and marriage bonds; 6. The purchase of women; Afterword.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)