From Bondage to Liberation: Writings by and about Afro-Americans from 1700-1918

Overview

Many of the authors in this collection have never been assembled together before. They represent both black and white voices, of different cultural backgrounds, from the beginnings of American history through the Dawn of the Harlem Renaissance.Until the late 1960s, the traditional American literary canon was segregated. Moreover, writings of widely anthologized authors rarely touched on race. Not until the 1980s did studies begin to reflect the multicultural diversity of the United States. Ironically, while ...

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Overview

Many of the authors in this collection have never been assembled together before. They represent both black and white voices, of different cultural backgrounds, from the beginnings of American history through the Dawn of the Harlem Renaissance.Until the late 1960s, the traditional American literary canon was segregated. Moreover, writings of widely anthologized authors rarely touched on race. Not until the 1980s did studies begin to reflect the multicultural diversity of the United States. Ironically, while mainstream anthologies became more inclusive and integrated, Afro-American literature collections concentrated on black authors excluded from the traditional Anglo-American canon.From Bondage to Liberation attempts a literary and cultural bridge across the racial divide. This book represents new and important views, through the lens of Faith Berry's narratives, of such well-known figures as Abraham Lincoln, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Mark Twain, Frederick Douglass, and many others. It presents an unflinching, multifaceted examination of the literary history of race relations in the United States, and thereby gives us a better understanding of where we have come from spiritually, socially, and economically - and where we may be going.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780826413703
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic
  • Publication date: 6/1/2001
  • Pages: 496

Meet the Author

Faith Berry is the author of the groundbreaking biography Langston Hughes: Before and beyond Harlem. She lives in Cincinnati, OH.

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Table of Contents

Preface 15
Acknowledgments 19
Pt. 1 From Slavery to the Civil War
Samuel Sewall (1652-1730) 23
From The Selling of Joseph (1700) 24
John Woolman (1720-72) 26
From Some Considerations on the Keeping Negroes: Part Second (1762) 27
Thomas Paine (1737-1809) 30
"African Slavery in America" (1775) 31
Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826) 35
From Notes on the State of Virginia (1785) 39
Letter to Marquis de Chastellux (1785) 43
Benjamin Banneker (1731-1806) 45
A Letter to Thomas Jefferson (1791) 46
Jupiter Hammon (1711-ca. 1806?) 50
An Address to the Negroes in The State of New York (1787) 51
Olaudah Equiano [Gustavus Vassa] (ca. 1745-ca. 1797) 60
From The Interesting Narrative of the Life ... (1789) 61
Benjamin Franklin (1706-90) 69
An Address to the Public: ... for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery, and the Relief of Free Negroes ... (1789) 70
Absalom Jones (1746-1818) 72
From A Thanksgiving Sermon on Abolition of the Slave Trade (1808) 73
Samuel E. Comish (1795-1858) and John B. Russwurm (1799-1851) 77
"To Our Patrons" - Opening Editorial of Freedom's Journal (1827) 79
James Fenimore Cooper (1789-1851) 83
"On Slavery" (1838) 84
"On American Slavery" (1838) 85
David Walker (1785-1830) 87
From Artcle IV of David Walker's Appeal in Four Articles (1829-30) 88
William Lloyd Garrison (1805-79) 92
"To the Public" - The Liberator's First Editorial (1831) 94
Maria W. Stewart (1803-79) 96
From Religion and the Pure Principles of Morality ... (1831) 98
Nat Turner (1800-1831) 102
From The Confessions of Nat Turner, the leader of the late insurrection in Southampton, Va. (1831) 103
Frances Milton Trollope (1780-1863) 108
From Domestic Manners of the Americans (1832) 109
John Pendleton Kennedy (1795-1870) 111
From Swallow Barn; or, A Sojourn in the Old Dominion (1832) 112
Lydia Mana Francis Child (1802-80) 119
From An Appeal in Favor of Americans Called Africans (1833) 120
John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-92) 122
From Justice and Expediency ... (1833) 123
Alexis de Tocqueville (1805-59) 127
From Democracy in America (1835) 128
James Kirke Paulding (1778-1860) 130
From Slavery in the United States (1836) 131
Angelina Grimke (1805-79) 134
From Appeal to the Christian Women of the Southern States (1836) 135
Theodore Dwight Weld (1803-95) 137
From American Slavery as It Is (1839) 139
Sarah Mapps Douglass (1806-82) 141
A Letter to Brother Garrison [w/Grace Douglass] (1839) 142
William Whipper (1804?-76) 144
On "Colorphobia" - from a Letter in the Colored American (1841) 145
Henry Highland Garnet (1815-82) 146
"An Address to the Slaves of the United States" (1843) 148
Frederick Douglass (1818?-95) 155
"The Rights of Women" (1848) 158
Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811-96) 160
From Key to Uncle Tom's Cabin: "Poor White Trash" (1853) 162
George Fitzhugh (1806-81) 166
From Sociology of the South (1854) 167
William Gilmore Simms (1806-70) 169
From Woodcraft; or, Hawks about the Dovecote ... (1854) 170
Martin Robison Delany (1812-85) 173
From The Political Destiny of the Colored Race (1854) 175
William Wells Brown (ca. 1816-84) 179
From Sketches of Places and People Abroad: The American Fugitive in Europe (1854) 181
William Cooper (ca. 1814-74) 185
From The Colored Patriots of the American Revolution (1855) 186
Roger Brooke Tancy (1777-1864) 190
From Dred Scott Decision: Opinion of the Court (1857) 192
Walt Whitman (1819-92) 200
Slavery (1857) 202
Josiah Henson (1789-1883) 204
From Truth Stranger Than Fiction: Father Henson's Story of His Own Life (1858) 206
John Brown (1800-1859) 208
Last Speech to the Virginia Court (November 2, 1859) 210
Charles Howard Langston (1817-92) 212
A Black Abolitionist in Defense of John Brown (November 18, 1859) 213
Henry David Troreau (1817-62) 217
From A Plea for John Brown (1859) 219
Sarah Parker Remond (1826-1894) 223
An Exchange of Letter on American Citizenship (1859) 224
Robert Purvis (1810-98) 227
From Your Government - It Is Not Mine (1860) 228
Ellen Craft (ca. 1826-97) and William Craft (1827-1900) 232
From Running a Thusand Miles for Freedom (1860) 234
Frederick Law Olmsted (1822-1903) 237
From The Cotton Kingdom: A Traveller's Observations on Cotton and Slavery in the American Slave States (1861) 238
Mary Boykin Chesnut (1823-86) 241
From A Diary from Dixie (1861) 243
Harriet Jacobs [Linda Brent] (1813-97) 247
From Incidents in the Life of a Slave girl ... (1861) 249
Nathaniel Hawthome (1804-64) 252
From Chiefly about War Matters (1862) 254
Abraham Lincoln (1809-65) 255
Address on Colonization ... (1862) 258
Meditation on the Divine Will (1862) 262
Isabella Van Wagenen [Sojourner Truth] (1797-1883) 263
Letter after a Visit to President Lincoln (1864) 266
Charlotte L. Forten Grimke (1837-1914) 268
From The Journal of Charlotte L. Forten (1863) 270
Thomas Wentworth Higginson (1823-1911) 272
From Army Life in a Black Regiment (1870) 274
Pt. 2 From Radical Reconstruction to the Dawn of the Harlem Renaissance
Frances Ellen Watkins Harper (1825-1911) 281
From Speech to Eleventh National Women's Rights Convention (1866) 283
Joel Chandler Harris (1848-1908) 286
The Old Plantation (1877) 288
Alexander Crummell (1819-98) 291
From The Black Woman of the South: Her Neglects and Her Needs (1883) 293
T. Thomas Fortune (1856-1928) 294
From Black and White: Land, Labor, and Politics in the South (1884) 297
Albion W. Tourgee (1838-1905) 302
From An Appeal to Caesar (1884) 305
George Washington Cable (1844-1925) 308
From The Freedman's Case in Equity (1885) 311
Booker T. Washington (1856-1915) 316
The South as an Opening for a Career (1888) 319
James Weldon Johnson (1871-1938) 324
Best Methods of Removing the Disabilities of Caste from the Negro (1892) 327
William Dean Howells (1837-1920) 331
Fron An Imperative Duty (1892) 334
Anna Julia Cooper (1858-1964) 342
From A Voice from the South (1892) 344
Fannie Barrier Williams (1855-1944) 346
From The Present Status and Intellectual Progress of Colored Women (1893) 348
Samuel L. Clemens [Mark Twain] (1835-1910) 358
From the Tragedy of Pudd'nhead Wilson (1894) 361
Paul Laurence Dunbar (1872-1906) 370
The Intervention of Peter (1898) 374
Sutton Griggs (1872-1930) 379
From Imperium in Imperio (1899) 381
Caroline Hollingswoth Pemberton (186?-1927) 384
From Stephen the Black (1899) 386
George Henry White (1852-1918) 390
Fron The Negroes' Temporary Farewell to Congress (1901) 392
Charles W. Chesnutt (1858-1932) 393
White Weeds (ca. 1903) 397
Pauline Elizabeth Hopkins (1859-1930) 412
From As the Lord Lives, He Is One of Our Mother's Children (1903) 416
William Monroe Trotter (1872-1934) 418
Has the Race the Element of Self-Salvation in It? (1903) 423
The Niagara Movement: The Men and Ideas behind It 425
From The Niagara Movement "Declaration of Principles" (1905) 427
Kelly Miller (1863-1939) 430
An Open Letter to Thomas Dixon, Jr. (1905) 432
Ida B. Wells-Bamett (1869-1931) 443
"Brutal Burnt Offerings" (1909) 447
Oswald Garrison Villard (1872-1949) 451
"A Call to Action" - the Advent of the NAACP (190ä ä
William Pickens (1881-1954) 458
From The New Negro (1916) 462
Carter G. Woodson (1875-1950) 465
From A Century of Negro Migration (1918) 467
Index 473
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