From Clockwork to Crapshoot: A History of Physics

Hardcover (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $26.99
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 9%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (6) from $26.99   
  • New (2) from $80.00   
  • Used (4) from $26.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$80.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(164)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$150.71
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(273)

Condition: New
Brand New Item.

Ships from: Chatham, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by

Overview

Science is about 6000 years old while physics emerged as a distinct branch some 2500 years ago. As scientists discovered virtually countless facts about the world during this great span of time, the manner in which they explained the underlying structure of that world underwent a philosophical evolution. From Clockwork to Crapshoot provides the perspective needed to understand contemporary developments in physics in relation to philosophical traditions as far back as ancient Greece.

Roger Newton, whose previous works have been widely praised for erudition and accessibility, presents a history of physics from the early beginning to our day--with the associated mathematics, astronomy, and chemistry. Along the way, he gives brief explanations of the scientific concepts at issue, biographical thumbnail sketches of the protagonists, and descriptions of the changing instruments that enabled scientists to make their discoveries. He traces a profound change from a deterministic explanation of the world--accepted at least since the time of the ancient Greek and Taoist Chinese civilizations--to the notion of probability, enshrined as the very basis of science with the quantum revolution at the beginning of the twentieth century. With this change, Newton finds another fundamental shift in the focus of physicists--from the cause of dynamics or motion to the basic structure of the world. His work identifies what may well be the defining characteristic of physics in the twenty-first century.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Popular science author Newton (Galileo's Pendulum) misses many nooks and crannies of his subject in this too brief survey of the history of physics. He focuses primarily on astrophysics and atomic physics, which no such book can be without, but which many excellent books focus on exclusively. A third of the way through, Newton spends a chapter on other subjects; it's hard to believe that there were no advances in, say, mechanics before 1800 worthy of discussion. Toward the end of the book, the author discusses advanced properties of magnetism. Developments in mathematics take up space that could have been given to the nooks and crannies. Capsule biographies of giants of physics, such as Michael Faraday and James Clerk Maxwell, help them come alive for readers. Newton writes well enough for general readers, but they would be advised to leave that space on their shelf for a more comprehensive overview of the field. B&w illus., 1 map. (Jan.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
This book's subtitle is a bit misleading as the text is not a history of physics but rather a personal investigation into the development of scientific thought over the past six millennia. Writing from a physics perspective, Newton (emeritus, Indiana Univ.; Galileo's Pendulum) uses biographical sketches combined with a history of the development of naturalistic theories to illustrate how the nature of basic philosophical questioning has evolved over time. Starting with the ancient Greeks, the author documents the shifting postulates of science from causality to probability, concluding with the equally interesting questions facing the 21st century. The text, which is written for lay readers interested in science, minimizes the use of technical language, figures, pictures, and notes. Suitable for all larger public libraries. Ian Gordon, Brock Univ. Lib., St. Catharines, Ont. Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Times Higher Education Supplement

Newton's account is superb. He is magnificent at explaining the profound influence of mathematics on the development of physics. The historical relationships between subdisciplines, such as thermodynamics and statistical physics, are illuminated. Numerous biographical sketches add a lively dynamic to an enjoyable book.
— Simon Mitton

History of Physics Newsletter

This book attempts in one volume to give a history of physics, from the dawn of mankind to the present day. It is a formidable task but one which I believe has been largely successful.
— Peter Ford

Science News
From the properties of matter to the constituents of the universe, this book illustrates how discoveries old and new have created modern physics.
Dudley Herschbach
This is an illuminating chronicle of mankind's adventures, over six millennia, in pursuit of physical laws. It is enhanced by lucid exposition of challenges and concepts, with engaging portraits of many avid actors in a grand, abiding drama.
Stephen G. Brush
Although there are several books on the history of physics, none is as up-to-date, comprehensive, and well-written as Newton's. Most other books either provide a very superficial explanation of the concepts and theories, or are too technical for most non-scientists to understand. Newton manages to maintain a consistent level and style, and to say just enough about the difficult issues to get the reader interested but not overwhelmed
Times Higher Education Supplement - Simon Mitton
Newton's account is superb. He is magnificent at explaining the profound influence of mathematics on the development of physics. The historical relationships between subdisciplines, such as thermodynamics and statistical physics, are illuminated. Numerous biographical sketches add a lively dynamic to an enjoyable book.
History of Physics Newsletter - Peter Ford
This book attempts in one volume to give a history of physics, from the dawn of mankind to the present day. It is a formidable task but one which I believe has been largely successful.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780674023376
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • Publication date: 1/15/2007
  • Pages: 352
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.30 (h) x 1.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Roger G. Newton is Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Physics at Indiana University.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents


Prologue     i
Beginnings     4
The Greek Miracle     11
Science in the Middle Ages     41
The First Revolution     67
Newton's Legacy     100
New Physics     121
Relativity     154
Statistical Physics     171
Probability     189
The Quantum Revolution     211
Fields, Nuclei, and Stars     248
The Properties of Matter     279
The Constituents of the Universe     290
Epilogue     308
Notes     313
Sources and Further Reading     316
Index     322
Acknowledgments     ix
List of Abbreviations of Ancient Sources     xi
Introduction     1
The Roman Woodworker     6
The Tools of the Trade     13
Joints     59
Foundations     72
Framing and Walls     90
Wooden Flooring     111
Roofing and Ceilings     123
Interior Woodwork     178
Wheels     202
Furniture and Veneers     213
Classification of Trees and Species of Timber Used by RomanWoodworkers     239
The Forests of Italy     263
Glossary of Roman Woodworking Terms     269
Roman Woodworking Tools     337
Notes     349
Bibliography     353
Index     365
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)