From Duty to Desire: Remaking Families in a Spanish Village

From Duty to Desire: Remaking Families in a Spanish Village

by Jane Fishburne Collier
     
 

In the 1980s, Jane Collier revisited a village in Andalusia, where she and others had conducted fieldwork twenty years earlier, to investigate changes in family relationships and to explore the larger question of the development of a "modern subjectivity" among the people. Whereas the villagers she met in the sixties stressed the importance of meeting social

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Overview

In the 1980s, Jane Collier revisited a village in Andalusia, where she and others had conducted fieldwork twenty years earlier, to investigate changes in family relationships and to explore the larger question of the development of a "modern subjectivity" among the people. Whereas the villagers she met in the sixties stressed the importance of meeting social obligations, the people she interviewed more recently emphasized the need to think for oneself: status concerns in choosing a spouse had apparently been replaced by romantic love, patriarchal authority by partnership marriages, parental demands for obedience by hopes of earning children's affection, mourners' respect for the dead by personal expressions of grief. In each of these areas, the author detected a modern concern for "producing oneself," which emerged with changes in how villagers experienced social inequality.

Collier notes that when inheritance appeared to determine social status, villagers protected family reputations and properties by demonstrating concern for "what others might say." Once villagers began participating in the national job market, where individual achievement appeared to determine a worker's income, they focused on realizing their inner abilities and productive capacities. Sensitivity to one's feelings, thoughts, and aptitudes, along with "rational" assessments of the costs and benefits entailed in "choosing" how to use them, testified to a person's unceasing efforts to realize inner potentials. The author also traces shifts in the meaning of "tradition," suggesting that although "modern" people cannot "be" traditional, they must have traditions in order to produce themselves.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780691016641
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Publication date:
11/10/1997
Series:
Princeton Studies in Culture/Power/History Series
Pages:
304
Product dimensions:
6.08(w) x 9.11(h) x 0.71(d)

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction3
Ch. 1Social Inequality: From Inherited Property to Occupational Achievement32
Ch. 2Courtship: From Honor to Romantic Love67
Ch. 3Marriage: From Co-owners to Coworkers113
Ch. 4Children: From Heirs to Parental Projects153
Ch. 5Mourning: From Respect to Grief177
Ch. 6Identity: From Villagers to Andalusians195
Notes219
References Cited249
Index261

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