From Gutenberg to Zuckerberg: Disruptive Innovation in the Age of the Internet: Disruptive Innovation in the Age of the Internet [NOOK Book]

Overview

John Naughton is the Observer's 'Networker' columnist, a prominent blogger, and Vice-President of Wolfson College, Cambridge. The Times has said that his writings, ?[it] draws on more than two decades of study to explain how the internet works and the challenges and opportunities it will offer to future generations,? and Cory Doctrow raved that "this is the kind of primer you want to slide under your boss?s door." In From Gutenberg to Zuckerberg, Naughton explores the living history of one of the most radically ...
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From Gutenberg to Zuckerberg: Disruptive Innovation in the Age of the Internet: Disruptive Innovation in the Age of the Internet

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Overview

John Naughton is the Observer's 'Networker' columnist, a prominent blogger, and Vice-President of Wolfson College, Cambridge. The Times has said that his writings, “[it] draws on more than two decades of study to explain how the internet works and the challenges and opportunities it will offer to future generations,” and Cory Doctrow raved that "this is the kind of primer you want to slide under your boss’s door." In From Gutenberg to Zuckerberg, Naughton explores the living history of one of the most radically transformational technologies of all time.
 
From Gutenberg to Zuckerberg is a clear-eyed history of one of the most central, and yet most taken-for-granted, features of modern life: the internet. Once a technological novelty and now the very plumbing of the Information Age, the internet is something we have learned to take largely for granted. So, how exactly has our society become so dependent upon a utility it barely understands? And what does it say about us that this is so? 

While explaining in highly engaging language the way the internet works and how it got to be the way it is, technologist John Naughton has distilled the noisy chatter surrounding the technology’s relentless evolution into nine essential areas of understanding. In doing so, he affords readers deeper insight into the information economy and supplies the requisite knowledge to make better use of the technologies and networks around us, highlighting some of their fascinating and far-reaching implications along the way.
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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
12/01/2013
The nature of the Internet is a difficult, slippery thing to define, but Naughton (senior research fellow, Ctr. for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences & Humanities, Univ. of Cambridge; A Brief History of the Future: The Origins of the Internet) makes it his goal to help readers better understand it. He describes how the Internet's infrastructure has given it a knack for creative disruption and why that's important for its future. Naughton effectively dispels confusion about the web and writes brief, accessible histories of technologies we currently enjoy, touching on the main points of topics more fully explored in books such as Andrew Keen's Digital Vertigo and Henry Jenkins's Spreadable Media. He ends with philosophical musings about the future of the Internet, underscoring issues such as privacy and security and how they may shape our use of the network. VERDICT This is a solid overview of Internet technology for those who use it but who don't feel that they comprehend it. Experts might not find much new information here, but the author's observations and analysis will give any reader a better grasp of the web's big picture.—Rachel Hoover, Thomas Ford Memorial Lib., Western Springs, IL
Publishers Weekly
10/14/2013
Naughton, a columnist at the U.K.’s Observer and author of A Brief History of the Future, offers a perceptive primer about the Information Age. Along the way, he provides a savvy historical overview of the information industry, from the printed page to the rapid evolution of the computer, to the WikiLeaks revelations. Naughton dissects the current debates surrounding copyright laws and intellectual property, distilling complex issues into accessible facts and revealing that our relationship with the Internet is indeed a work in progress. Avoiding an abundance of scare tactics found in many books of this type, Naughton offers a practical approach to the ever-evolving Internet and takes “the long view” of coexistence without overplaying the fears of over-dependence, lack of security, and privacy. (Jan.)
From the Publisher
PRAISE FOR FROM GUTENBERG TO ZUCKERBERG
"A fantastic read and a marvel of economy… This is the kind of primer you want to slide under your boss’s door." —Cory Doctorow, New York Times bestselling author and co-editor of Boing Boing
 
"[Naughton is] willing to take a stab at the unpredictable. . . .  Naughton warns of two possible outcomes of our networked futures envisioned by the English writers George Orwell and Aldus Huxley—one a prison of our fears under the constant, watchful eye of Big Brother; the other in which our own sense of self gets lost in a sea of our own self-indulgence." —David Siegfried, Booklist

“John Naughton’s easy journalistic style gives me all the information I sort of knew and facts I hadn’t joined up.” Joan Bakewell, New Statesman
  
“An accessible guide to the internet . . . Naughton draws on more than two decades of study to explain how the internet works and the challenges and opportunities it will offer to future generations.” The Times

Kirkus Reviews
2013-10-28
So what's the big deal with this Internet thing, anyway? Technology historian and writer Naughton (Vice President/Wolfson Coll., Cambridge; A Brief History of the Future, 2000) provides a mostly convincing answer. Former Talking Heads frontman and author David Byrne has lately been pointing out that the Internet is a terrible thing for music and culture, largely due to the fact that it's made it impossible to sell what can be freely stolen--beg pardon, downloaded. Naughton takes a more forgiving view, invoking the Schumpeterian notion of creative destruction, which requires…well, destruction. In the case of the Internet, part of what is being destroyed is an old economy, though, as Naughton notes, in the case of the musical economy, it could have worked out differently had the record companies not been so greedy. And part, more ominously, are old ideas of freedom and privacy: "For governments of all political stripes--from authoritarian regimes to liberal democracies--the Internet is a surveillance tool made in heaven, because much of the surveillance can be done, not by expensive and fallible human beings, but by computers." You are your clickstream, and therein, it must be noted, as Naughton does, lie Orwellian possibilities. Along the way, the author makes good points on the history of various Internet stalwarts, not least of them Facebook, and notes how the Internet defies some of the fundamental principles of economics, especially scarcity, since the Internet is an embarrassment of riches and too-muchness, if also an engine of decentralization. Most of this will come as no news to those familiar with, say, Malcolm Gladwell or Jaron Lanier, but Naughton's optimism and easily worn learning makes this a pleasure to read.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781623650636
  • Publisher: Quercus
  • Publication date: 1/7/2014
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 353,724
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

John Naughton is the bestselling author of A Brief History of the Future: The Origins of the Internet. He is also the Observer’s “Networker” columnist and a prominent blogger at memex.naughtons.org. Naughton is also vice president of Wolfson College, Cambridge, England, where he lives. 
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