From Manassas to Appomattox; Memoirs of the Civil War in America

From Manassas to Appomattox; Memoirs of the Civil War in America

3.3 33
by James Longstreet
     
 

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General Longstreet in one of the most controversial figures on the Civil War. Long criticized for his role at Gettsburg, historical opinion has begun to view him in a more favorable light. He was dependable, if not brilliant, a staunch fighter. Certainly Lee relied upon him most of all his officers. He acquitted himself bravely in many of the war's bloodiest

Overview

General Longstreet in one of the most controversial figures on the Civil War. Long criticized for his role at Gettsburg, historical opinion has begun to view him in a more favorable light. He was dependable, if not brilliant, a staunch fighter. Certainly Lee relied upon him most of all his officers. He acquitted himself bravely in many of the war's bloodiest battles. And if his critics have been numerous, his most stubborn defenders were always the men who served under him.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781313214513
Publisher:
HardPress Publishing
Publication date:
01/28/2013
Pages:
804
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.60(d)

Read an Excerpt


FROM MANASSAS TO APPOMATTOX. CHAPTEB I. THE ANTE-BELLUM LIFE OF THE AUTHOR. BirthAncestrySchool-Boy DaysAppointment as Cadet at the United States Military AcademyGraduates of Historic Classes Assignment as Brevet LieutenantGay Life of Garrison at Jefferson BarracksLieutenant Grant's CourtshipAnnexation of Texas- Army of ObservationArmy of OccupationCamp Life in Texas March to the Rio GrandeMexican War. I Was born in Edgefield District, South Carolina, on the 8th of January, 1821. On the paternal side the family was from New Jersey; on my mother's side, from Maryland. My earliest recollections were of the Georgia side of Savannah River, and my school-days were passed there, but the appointment to West Point Academy was from North Alabama. My father, James Longstreet, the oldest child of William Longstreet and Hannah Fitzran- dolph, was born in New Jersey. Other children of the marriage, Rebecca, Gilbert, Augustus B., and William, were born in Augusta, Georgia, the adopted home. Richard Longstreet, who came to America in 1657 and settled in Monmouth County, New Jersey, was the progenitor of the name on this continent. It is difficult to determine whether the name sprang from France, Germany, or Holland. On the maternal side, Grandfather Marshall Dent was first cousin of John Marshall, of the Supreme Court. That branch claimed to trace their lineback to the Conqueror. Marshall Dent married a Ma- gruder, when they migrated to Augusta, Georgia. Father married the eldest daughter, Mary Ann. Grandfather William Longstreet first applied steam as a motive power, in 1787, to a small boat on the Savannah River at Augusta, and spent all of his private means upon that idea, asked aid of hisfriends in Augusta and elsewhere, had no encouragement, but, on the contra...

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From Manassas to Appomattox: Memoirs of the Civil War in America (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading) 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 33 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Beware of these books, Ckarles River Editors and other are giving you small portions of much larger books when after you read their description of the books you expect much much more. Barn and Nob,e should be ashamed for allow such deception to go on. At the very least the description should state the number of pages you are buying, this has eight.
kmmisegades More than 1 year ago
General Longstreet wrote well but the conversion of his book into an eBook is so poorly crafted that reading it is frustrating. Also, there are parts missing. The text jumps from the middle of his family history right into the midst of the first battle of Bull Run. I am back in search of another version.
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