From Russia With Love

( 19 )

Overview

From Russia With Love is a book in the long running James Bond Agent 007 Series. It is the second in the movie series.
The author, Ian Fleming, was a real British Naval Intelligence Secret Service Agent during World War II. Many of the events in the James Bond Series are similar to actual real events during the war and during the Cold War that immediately followed the shooting war. Ian Fleming often did not even change the names or he used the ...
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Overview

From Russia With Love is a book in the long running James Bond Agent 007 Series. It is the second in the movie series.
The author, Ian Fleming, was a real British Naval Intelligence Secret Service Agent during World War II. Many of the events in the James Bond Series are similar to actual real events during the war and during the Cold War that immediately followed the shooting war. Ian Fleming often did not even change the names or he used the names of real people for his characters.
For chess players, the most interesting scene comes from the beginning of the movie, depicting a chess championship. During the chess game, Kronsteen, the master strategist for SMERSH, receives a message on the bottom of a glass of water he is handed stating "You are required at once". This order meant that he must resign the game for the Championship. However, Kronsteen disobeys the order even though knowing that disobeying the order would be punishable by his death.
This scene in the book and the movie is based on an actual real chess event. In the 1951 Match for the World Chess Championship, the challenger, Bronstein, was playing the champion, Botvinnik. Bronstein was a point ahead in the match and a pawn ahead in the next to last game. All Bronstein had to do was draw or win that game and he would have been World Chess Champion.
Yet, Bronstein thought 40 minutes about this position and then, inexplicably, resigned the game in this position and his chance for the World Chess Championship.
Did Bronstein receive such a message from his KGB Colonel? Why did Bronstein think 40 minutes and then resign? Did not those 40 minutes give KGB Colonel Baturinsky time to hand Bronstein a note telling him to resign? The world has been asking these questions ever since.

For the rest of his life, Bronstein was repeatedly asked that question: "Did or did not the KGB order you to throw the 23rd game?"

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9784871876469
  • Publisher: Ishi Press
  • Publication date: 2/14/2013
  • Pages: 288
  • Sales rank: 1,105,628
  • Product dimensions: 5.25 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.65 (d)

Meet the Author

Ian Fleming (1908-1964) worked in Naval Intelligence at the British Admiralty during World War II. His wartime experiences provided him with the inspiration for his sensationally popular James Bond novels.

Chris Garver is widely considered to be among the world's best tattoo artists. Featured on TLC's highly-rated series Miami Ink, his work has brought him to Asia, North and South America, and Europe.

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Table of Contents

1 Roseland 3
2 The Slaughterer 11
3 Post-graduate Studies 20
4 The Moguls of Death 28
5 Konspiratsia 37
6 Death Warrant 46
7 The Wizard of Ice 55
8 The Beautiful Lure 66
9 A Labour of Love 75
10 The Fuse Burns 86
11 The Soft Life 95
12 A Piece of Cake 103
13 áBEA Takes You There...' 112
14 Darko Kerim 121
15 Background to a Spy 131
16 The Tunnel of Rats 141
17 Killing Time 150
18 Strong Sensations 160
19 The Mouth of Marilyn Monroe 170
20 Black on Pink 178
21 Orient Express 187
22 Out of Turkey 198
23 Out of Greece 205
24 Out of Danger 215
25 A Tie with a Windsor Knot 223
26 The Killing Bottle 234
27 Ten Pints of Blood 245
28 La Tricoteuse 251
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 19 )
Rating Distribution

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(13)

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Sort by: Showing all of 19 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 23, 2004

    A Great Cold War Thriller

    By far the most intelligent and realistic of the Bond books. Fleming's description of the MGB (later KGB) headquarters in Moscow's Dzherzinsky Square, where the plot to lure British agent James Bond to his death is first revealed, is reputedly based on information to which he was privy in his capacity as a WWII officer in British Naval Intelligence -- likewise the recruitment and training of the psychopathic killer Red Grant, one of the most formidable of Bond's enemies (and the only one in the films who looked for a while about to kill Bond for sure! 007 meets his match in Grant!) This is the book behind what in my opinion is the best of the Bond movies, steeped in the atmosphere of the Cold War into which the Bond series was born. 007 travels to Istanbul in pursuit of the bait, a Lektor decoder which can read top secret Soviet military and intelligence signal traffic. Another form of bait is the beautiful Tatiana Romanova, an MGB cipher clerk allegedly in love with Bond, willing to defect with the Lektor if only 007 will come and fetch her. (Fleming takes yet another jab at the Reds by choosing this name for Bond's love interest -- Romanov was the family name of the last Czar of old imperial Russia, the family doomed to extinction by the Russian revolution.) Kerim Bey adds a bit of panache, mischief and mystery as 'Our man in Istanbul,' Head of Station T (for Turkey). A truly great and suspenseful plot!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 14, 2003

    Fantastic Novel

    This Bond book was a fantastic story. the different pov's were great, and this was an all around good book. some thought it to start off slow, but it makes up for it at the end with the train ride.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 22, 2003

    THE GREATEST NOVEL I'VE EVER READ!!!

    SMERSH is fed up. Their plans and schemes chronicaled in (respectively)Casino Royale, Live & Let Die, Moonraker & Diamonds Are Forever have not only been derailed, but all by the same British secret agent 007 James Bond. The plot simple -eliminate 007 and disgrace his reputation of honorable service to his country. The bait, one red hot Soviet defector Tatiana Romanova bearing unconditional love for one James Bond and the promise to deliver a lecter deciphering machine, and a super assasin guaranteed to provide the elimination. A fiendish plot carried out with precise calculation that fails to take one matter into consideration, James Bond's license to kill is only surpassed by his will to survive.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 5, 2003

    The best Bond novel that I have read

    Flemmings fifth Bond novel is the best I have read so far. It has the perfect mixture of action, character development and suspense. It is a must read for any bond fan.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 4, 2002

    00Lover

    In this good, sexy, and exciting Bond adventure Bond is taking on a whole new mission. As we know, James is still getting rid of SPECTRE, but it is a great novel.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 18, 2014

    My biggest complaint with FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE¿aside from the u

    My biggest complaint with FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE—aside from the usual male chauvinism and innocent women who need a real man—I was well into this novel (over a third of the way) before Bond made his appearance. Did I really need to know that much about Mother Russia? I think not. I’d have been happier with much less, frankly, and I would have kept a few more sanity points.

    I even debated skipping ahead, but since I’ve approached my task of reading the entire Bond series the way one might approach a calculus exam, I trudged onward, even if there were times in the beginning where my unhappiness reached a near monumental level.

    And then Bond showed up in all of his male glory and all was right with the world. Or at least I thought so…until two tribal women in loincloths fight each other to the death, one with a massive bosom and the other a little less endowed, as the sun glistens off their naked, perfect bodies. Excuse me…what? Son of a Walther PPK! My inner goddess just cursed a red, white, and blue streak. And I probably fainted from a heatstroke.

    At this point, I might have actually cheered for a buxom beauty the size of a tank to haul off and repeatedly whack Bond with a knotted rope while his pants are around his ankles and a group of Russian women stare on in equal parts delight and horror. Turnabout is fair play, right?

    Other than being young and nubile and having looks that could kill, I was not particularly impressed with Tatiana Romanova. She might have had a certain amount of innocence, but I wasn’t buying it.

    This supposed thriller left with me few thrills, except for the one I received when I finished it.

    Side bar – I’ve started watching Mad Men. The reason I mention this is between reading the Bond novels and watching that AMC show—which end up being somewhat enjoyable for entirely different reasons and equally aggravating for the rampant, raging sexism—I feel like I’m next in line for lung cancer, even though I’ve never smoked a day in my life.

    Robert Downs
    Author of Falling Immortality: Casey Holden, Private Investigator

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 29, 2013

    Please bring back to the nook

    Please bring back to the nook

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