From Slavery to Freedom: A History of African Americans / Edition 8

From Slavery to Freedom: A History of African Americans / Edition 8

by John Hope Franklin, Alfred A. Moss
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0375406719

ISBN-13: 9780375406713

Pub. Date: 03/14/2000

Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group

This is the dramatic, exciting, authoritative story of the experiences of African Americans from the time they left Africa to their continued struggle for equality at the end of the twentieth century.

Since its original publication in 1947, From Slavery to Freedom has stood as the definitive his-tory of African Americans. Coauthors John Hope Franklin and

Overview

This is the dramatic, exciting, authoritative story of the experiences of African Americans from the time they left Africa to their continued struggle for equality at the end of the twentieth century.

Since its original publication in 1947, From Slavery to Freedom has stood as the definitive his-tory of African Americans. Coauthors John Hope Franklin and Alfred A. Moss, Jr., give us a vividly detailed account of the journey of African Americans from their origins in the civilizations of Africa, through their years of slavery in the New World, to the successful struggle for freedom and its aftermath in the West Indies, Latin America, and the United States.

This eighth edition has been revised to include expanded coverage of Africa; additional material in every chapter on the history and current situation of African Americans in the United States; new charts, maps, and black-and-white illustrations; and a third four-page color insert. The authors incorporate recent scholarship to examine slavery, the Civil War, Reconstruction, and the period between World War I and World War II (including the Harlem Renaissance).

From Slavery to Freedom describes the rise of slavery, the interaction of European and African cultures in the New World, and the emergence of a distinct culture and way of life among slaves and free blacks. The authors examine the role of blacks in the nation's wars, the rise of an articulate, restless free black community by the end of the eighteenth century, and the growing resistance to slavery among an expanding segment of the black population.

The book deals in considerable detail with the period after slavery, including the arduous struggle for first-class citizenship that has extended into the twentieth century. Many developments in recent African American history are examined, including demographic change; educational efforts; literary and cultural changes; problems in housing, health, juvenile matters, and poverty; the expansion of the black middle class; and the persistence of discrimination in the administration of justice.

All who are interested in African Americans' continuing quest for equality will find a wealth of information based on the recent findings of many scholars. Professors Franklin and Moss have captured the tragedies and triumphs, the hurts and joys, the failures and successes, of blacks in a lively and readable volume that remains the most authoritative and comprehensive book of its kind.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780375406713
Publisher:
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date:
03/14/2000
Edition description:
Subsequent
Pages:
768
Product dimensions:
7.40(w) x 9.30(h) x 1.20(d)

Table of Contents

Visual Featuresxi
Prefacexvii
A Note to the Instructors about Supplementsxxi
About the Authorsxxiii
1Land of Their Ancestors1
Ghana2
Mali4
Songhay6
Other States9
2The African Way of Life15
Political Institutions16
Economic Life18
Social Organization20
Religion24
The Arts27
African Culture in the Diaspora30
3The Slave Trade and the New World33
European and Asian Interests34
Africans in the New World37
The Big Business of Slave Trading40
One-Way Passage44
Colonial Enterprise in the Caribbean50
The Plantation System51
Slavery in Mainland Latin America57
4Colonial Slavery64
Virginia and Maryland65
The Carolinas and Georgia69
The Middle Colonies72
Blacks in Colonial New England75
5That All May Be Free79
Slavery and the Revolutionary Philosophy80
Blacks Fighting for American Independence84
The Movement to Manumit Slaves91
The Conservative Reaction93
6Blacks in the New Republic96
The Black Population in 179097
Slavery and the Industrial Revolution99
Trouble in the Caribbean101
The Closing of the Slave Trade104
The Search for Independence105
7Blacks and Manifest Destiny118
Frontier Influences119
Black Pioneers in the Westward March120
The War of 1812122
Emergence of the Cotton Kingdom125
The Domestic Slave Trade128
Persistence of the African Trade136
8That Peculiar Institution138
Scope and Extent139
The Slave Codes140
Plantation Scene143
Nonagricultural Pursuits150
Social Considerations151
The Slave's Reaction to Bondage158
9Quasi-Free Blacks167
American Anomaly168
Economic and Social Development172
The Struggle in the North and West184
Colonization187
10Slavery and Intersectional Strife192
The North Attacks193
Black Abolitionists199
Runaways--Overland and Underground204
The South Strikes Back210
Stress and Strain in the 1850s214
11Civil War220
Uncertain Federal Policy221
Moving toward Freedom228
Confederate Policy233
Blacks Fighting for the Union238
Victory!243
12The Effort to Attain Peace245
Reconstruction and the Nation246
Conflicting Policies249
Relief and Rehabilitation253
Economic Adjustment258
Political Currents264
13Losing the Peace272
The Struggle for Domination273
The Overthrow of Reconstruction277
The Movement for Disfranchisement281
The Triumph of White Supremacy286
14Philanthropy and Self-Help292
Northern Philanthropy and African-American Education293
The Age of Booker T. Washington299
Struggles in the Economic Sphere307
Social and Cultural Growth313
15The Color Line326
The New American Imperialism327
America's Empire of People of Color335
Urban Problems340
The Pattern of Violence345
New Solutions for Old Problems350
16In Pursuit of Democracy357
World War I358
The Enlistment of African Americans360
Service Overseas366
On the Home Front374
17Democracy Escapes382
The Reaction383
The Voice of Protest Rises392
18The Harlem Renaissance400
Socioeconomic Problems and African-American Literature401
Harlem, the Seat and Center404
The Circle Widens415
19The New Deal418
Depression419
Political Regeneration422
Roosevelt's "Black Cabinet"429
Government Agencies and Relief for Blacks432
Black Labor and the Unions439
20The American Dilemma444
Trends in Education445
Opportunities for Self-Expression455
The World of African Americans464
One World or Two?470
21Fighting for the Four Freedoms475
Arsenal of Democracy476
Blacks in the Service481
The Home Fires492
The United Nations and Human Welfare499
22African Americans in the Cold War Era505
Progress506
Reaction511
Urbanization and Its Consequences515
23The Black Revolution522
The Road to Revolution523
The Beginnings526
Marching for Freedom532
The Illusion of Equality538
Revolution at High Tide549
Balance Sheet of the Revolution559
24Reaction and Progress563
The Reagan Years564
A New Economic and Political Thrust570
The Bush Quadrennium574
Writers and Artists in Later Years580
Heard and Seen by Millions590
25Half Century of Change602
Stirrings603
"On the Pulse of Morning"612
Race-Based Politics614
Enlarging Educational Opportunities616
African Americans and the World619
Bibliographical Notes637
Appendixes686
Acknowledgments704
Index705

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