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Letters to God: From the Major Motion Picture [NOOK Book]

Overview

This ebook novel is inspired by the major motion picture, Letters to God, scheduled for theatrical release in spring 2010. Viewers of the film will be eager to hear more of this inspiring story. Tyler, a nine-year-old boy, is stricken with incurable brain cancer and begins to write letters to God. He turns his suffering into spiritual lessons for his widowed mother, his embittered adolescent brother, and a troubled postman.

Letters to God ...
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Letters to God: From the Major Motion Picture

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Overview

This ebook novel is inspired by the major motion picture, Letters to God, scheduled for theatrical release in spring 2010. Viewers of the film will be eager to hear more of this inspiring story. Tyler, a nine-year-old boy, is stricken with incurable brain cancer and begins to write letters to God. He turns his suffering into spiritual lessons for his widowed mother, his embittered adolescent brother, and a troubled postman.

Letters to God probes some of the most important and most-often-asked questions that trouble people of faith: “Why do we suffer?” “Where is God?” “Why do godly, faithful children have to battle cancer?” This inspiring story of hope will help people from all walks work toward greater understanding of God’s presence and care.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780310597360
  • Publisher: Zondervan
  • Publication date: 3/9/2010
  • Series: Letters to God
  • Sold by: Zondervan Publishing
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 279,672
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Before focusing his creative energies on fiction, Patrick Doughtie honed his artistic skills as a newspaperman, recording artist, and screenwriter. He was one of the youngest newspaper general managers in California when he and one of his four brothers decided to move to Nashville to pursue a music career. In 1996, after his son Tyler was born, Patrick left the late nights and long trips of the music world to start a construction business in Nashville. After his son’s death in 2005, he began his career as a screenwriter. Patrick has written five screenplays and two short-subject scripts in a variety of genres: comedy, drama, thriller, action, and a children’s story.

John Perry graduated cum laude from Vanderbilt University, with additional studies at University College, Oxford, England. Before beginning his career as an author in 1997, he was an award-winning advertising copywriter and radio producer. John has published 21 books as an author, collaborator, or ghostwriter. He is the biographer of Sgt. Alvin York, Mary Custis Lee (wife of Robert E. Lee and great granddaughter of Martha Washington), and George Washington Carver. Among other books, he has also written about the 1925 Scopes “monkey” trial (Monkey Business, with Marvin Olasky, B&H Publishing, 2005) and contemporary prison reform (God Behind Bars, Thomas Nelson, 2006). He is a two-time Gold Medallion finalist and Lincoln Prize nominee. He lives in Nashville.

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Read an Excerpt

Letters to God

From the Major Motion Picture
By Patrick Doughtie John Perry

ZONDERVAN

Copyright © 2010 Patrick Doughtie and John Perry
All right reserved.

ISBN: 978-0-310-32765-3


Chapter One

Patrick

Patrick Doherty fished around in the desk drawer for a pencil without taking his eyes off the page. Not that he was in a hurry; he just never wanted to waste any of his precious quiet time. A small circle of light fell from a lamp in the corner where he sat. The street outside was still dark, and his wife, Maddy, still slept, burrowed deep under the covers, her breathing slow and regular. Very soon a high-energy three-year-old would come bounding into the bedroom and quiet time would be over. As much as he loved his son's morning hello, he wanted to finish a couple of things first.

Rereading a sentence, Patrick underlined three lines in his Bible and jotted a thought out to the side, where the margins were already peppered with years' worth of questions, comments, and references. To him it made sense to have his notes handy like that.

Patrick finished reading, then cracked open the window blinds enough to send a few thin parallel strips of dawn light across the desktop. Sliding open the lap drawer, he took out a notebook with a handwritten title on the front: Letters to God. He flipped through to the first blank page and sat thinking for a minute before starting to write rapidly, the words tumbling outalmost faster than he could get them down. He paused, read over what he'd written, and smiled, looking at his wife and wishing she'd open her eyes and look back. He loved her eyes.

As he started writing again, he heard little feet scurrying down the hall and a voice chirping, "Rise and shine! Rise and shine!"

"Hey, Tiger," Patrick said.

"Hey, Dad," Tyler Doherty answered from the bedroom doorway, then looked at the lump in the bed. "Hey, Mom! Time to get up!"

The lump rustled only a little. "Not yet, sweetie. Mommy needs more sleep."

"But I'm hungry."

"Don't worry, Ty," the lump answered groggily. "You won't starve to death. Mommy'll be up in a minute."

Ty pattered over to the desk in the corner where his father sat and looked out through the blinds. The sun rising behind the big moss-covered live oaks that lined the street gave them long, crisp shadows on the pavement. Ty liked watching the sun come up. He saw people walking their dogs on the sidewalk and a car backing out of the driveway in front of a blue house across the way. A few doors down, his friend Samantha's dad came out to get the paper. Turning to look at his dad, Ty was at eye level with the open notebook.

"Whatcha doing, Daddy?"

"Writing."

"Writing what?"

"I'm writing a letter to God."

"Wow!" Ty was impressed. "Will he write you back?"

How, at six thirty in the morning, could he explain this to a three-year-old, even a very sharp three-year-old?

"Well, no ... I mean, yes, in a way, Son."

Ty furrowed his little brow. Maddy was up now, and Patrick looked at her with a silent plea for help.

"You're on your own, messenger boy," she said to Patrick with a chuckle as she headed down the hall to root Ben out of bed. Ty's eleven-year-old brother was the certified baghound in the family.

"When I write a letter to God, it's my way of talking to him. I'm praying, really."

Ty thought it over. "Why don't you just talk to him then?"

"Well, I've always had a hard time praying, and it's easier for me to write him a letter. Sometimes he answers them, but not with another letter exactly. You see?"

Tyler shook his head.

"You will, you will." Patrick laughed, ran his hand over Ty's light blond hair, then held out his arms for Ty to jump into them. "I love you, Ty."

"I love you, Daddy."

Glancing at the bedside alarm, Patrick set Ty on the bed and stood. "I've got to get ready for work, Son. We'll talk more about it later. Go help your mom wake Ben up for school."

"Okay!" With a yelp of excitement, Ty raced through the hall, screaming, "Ben! Get up!" Sliding to a halt in his older brother's bedroom doorway, he waved the door back and forth, then banged it open against the wall. "Rise and shine!"

Two blue eyes topped by a nest of dark hair peered out from under the sheet. "Get lost, dork," came a voice from somewhere in the pile.

Ty pivoted on one foot and bolted back to his parents' room. It was empty; Mom was downstairs starting breakfast and Dad was in the bathroom with the door closed. Ty could hear the shower running. He walked over to the desk where his dad's notebook still lay open. This was the perfect time to draw Daddy a picture! Ty grabbed the pencil and made a circle beside two stick figures, one larger than the other; it was him and his dad and the sunrise. Hearing the shower shut off, he dropped the pencil in the middle of the notebook and ran giggling from the room.

Patrick appeared wrapped in a bathrobe, briskly rubbing his wet hair with a towel. He was an inch or so over six feet, though his muscular shoulders and athletic posture made him seem even taller. Physical labor had kept his body lean, only a few pounds heavier than his playing weight a dozen years ago on the way to a baseball scholarship. His freshly shaven face was lightly lined, tanned and ruddy from years of working outdoors, the deep blue eyes framed by thick dark hair. Ben had his hair and eyes. Ty was brown-eyed and blond like his mother.

Patrick looked toward the sound of giggles and footsteps in the hall, then at the desk. Picking up his notebook, he saw the scribbles on top of that morning's letter. His frown of irritation changed to a wide grin as he read the last sentence he'd written: "And Lord, all I ask is for a little sunshine today, something to make it a little better than yesterday." There his sunshine was, taking up nearly the whole page.

"Thank you, Lord," he said, looking upward. "I haven't even left the house yet this morning, and you've already answered my prayer."

As he headed for the kitchen a few minutes later, the smell of cinnamon toast-the boys' favorite-met him on the stairs. The Doherty home was the airy, rambling kind of old house that some people called "four square," with a bedroom upstairs in each corner and a big stair hall in the middle. The high ceilings helped keep it cool during the Orlando summers, and big windows let in lots of light in the wintertime. Patrick was dressed for "the office"-jeans, a work shirt, heavy boots, and a baseball cap, to which he would shortly add a tool belt and nail apron. His strong, calloused hands came not from pushing papers behind a desk but from long days as a carpenter, carrying, cutting, measuring, and fitting lumber, swinging a sixteen-ounce hammer, and climbing around construction sites.

Passing by Ben and Ty at the breakfast table, he reached for a mug of steaming coffee waiting on the counter. Expertly juggling the mug, he took a Thermos and lunchbox from Maddy's outstretched hands, gave her a kiss on the lips, and headed for the door.

"Hey, Dad," Ben hollered after him, "you're gonna make it to my football game today, right?"

Patrick stopped in his tracks and cut his eyes over to Maddy. Behind the children and out of their sight, she held up an outstretched palm, wiggling all five fingers.

"Uh, yeah. It starts at five, right?"

"Right!" Ben said, grinning.

"Wouldn't miss it!"

Maddy flagged for his attention. "You don't have to work tonight?"

"I'll be there." He shot her a look that said, "Don't you worry about it; I'll take care of things," then a quick smile in Ben's direction as he continued out the door. "I love you guys."

"I love you too," the chorus answered, and he was gone. They heard his truck start then watched him drive across in front of the house and out of sight.

He hadn't wanted that second job working nights for a janitorial service. It took him away from supper time and evenings with his family, and what little time he was home he felt bushed. But he didn't see any choice. Even though new homes were going up all over south Florida and the carpentry business was booming, he couldn't seem to get ahead on his construction salary. "Make my own mess by day, clean up somebody else's mess by night" was the way he put it. At least the night work was physically easy even if it was boring: sweeping, mopping, and emptying trash at a bank downtown.

At 7:30 a.m. sharp, Patrick pulled into the job site, a new house on a big lot at the edge of town, and parked in a row of trucks shaded by a cluster of date palms. Before grabbing his tool belt, he flipped down the sun visor where a favorite picture, the four of them at the beach, was slipped under a rubber band. He nodded at it as he opened the door. "It's all for you guys," he said and headed across the lot and around pallets of construction materials to his table saw.

Patrick liked carpentry work and knew he had a knack for it. He liked the physical part of the job, spending the day outside, moving around, breathing fresh air. He never knew how so many people in the world could spend the day sitting behind a desk with a tie on.

He'd hoped to slip away a few minutes early for Ben's game, but with all the rain the last couple of weeks he was behind schedule and just couldn't manage it. By the time he finally headed for the field, the first drive of the second quarter was under way and Hill Middle School had the ball on their own forty-four.

* * *

Ben popped his head up out of the huddle of eleven- and twelve-year-olds and scanned the bleachers. He said he'd be here. He looked at his mother. As Ty jumped up and down beside her, she met his gaze with a big thumbs-up. She hoped Patrick would make the game, but it was getting late.

(Continues...)



Excerpted from Letters to God by Patrick Doughtie John Perry Copyright © 2010 by Patrick Doughtie and John Perry. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 53 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(38)

4 Star

(6)

3 Star

(5)

2 Star

(3)

1 Star

(1)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 53 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 24, 2012

    Good Read

    This book is a good read about a wife who loses her husband to a drunk driver but then has to deal with her son getting cancer and he then dies at the end. He shares his faith in God in this book

    3 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 31, 2010

    If you have even an OUNCE of faith...

    ..this book is for you! What a great way to illustrate faith and the need to have it. Communicating with God is a prominent issue in today's society and this book clearly illustrated a way that is both touching and leaves an imprint in your heart. A family with a struggle could never overcome the issues this family faces.. but a family with a struggle AND God can accomplish anything!

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 19, 2012

    Touching

    This is a very heart braking book. i saw the movie it was very touching and very sad he gave his life to God ,i am 13 right now and i thik it was emotional we should give our life to Jesus Christ just like he did.:(

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 27, 2014

    The book Letters to God

    Very well written, a heartfelt sorry of loss, greiving, and faith. A must read!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 16, 2013

    OMG

    I love this book so much

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2013

    I don't have enough money to get the book right now.

    I don't have enough money for the book yet but the thing is the the movie is on of my favories. It os so sad and emotional but happy in a way knowing God is taking care of you and guiding you through your everydaife. Even if you are having a hard tim or things are not going as planned Jesus will help you find your destiny before it is time to go.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 5, 2013

    Cole

    I love this book, every time i here the story at confirmation or watch the movie i just start crying. I even got the letters to god bible from confirmation. It's a really touching to my heart.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 26, 2012

    GREAT READ!!!!

    I definitly recommend this book to young and old readers. Even if you don't have ties to God ,this book will make you want to.
    It contains alittle bit of every human emotion and then some. If you have the oppurtunity to read it or even see the movie you'll be glad you did

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 5, 2012

    Very sad:(

    You know it is very sad and touching and if it would let me i qould hive this book this many stars ************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************ very very Godly † book.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2012

    I've watched the movie, but i'm sure the movies better.

    I wonder if the book is even good?

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 15, 2012

    Listen to God

    Listen to God like Maddy did in this book. He always wants to hear from you. Pray ro God and ask Him what He wants you to do. Trust in the one who let and is letting live your life.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 9, 2012

    Pass the tissues

    Very touching.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 8, 2012

    Best book ever!

    I absoluteley<3 this book! It is so inspiring and touching!
    Everyone should read Letters to God? because its vey easy to chomprehend and it is so amazing!!!!!!!! I <3 it SO much!!!!!!!!!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 23, 2011

    Very good!

    I really enjoyed this book! I got so into it that I cried! It was totally worth buying!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 17, 2011

    AWESOME BOOK

    This book is awesome! It is so inspirational and at times in the book it is hard to believe that it is a true story! I recommend this book to everyone who wants a great story!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 30, 2011

    Amazing

    This book is beyond words. I read the book and watxh ed the movie and i was truely touched. My best friends little sister dies od cancer about 6 months ago and it is still harr and some may say that the story is a llittle unrealistic at placs. Well its really not. Many of the same problems happened with the davis family. I thank gid for my little angle and all the little ones who have camcer because they relly touch peoples lives i know little tyler did and i know thaat my little madison did . I love you madison. Tell jesus hello for me . Love you always . O and please read this book its amazing and it can teach you lessons that you probally are in need of learning

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 22, 2011

    letters to god

    this book is pretty much about a little boy who has terminal cancer, he copes with the cancer by writing letters to god. he prays not only healing for himself but for healing for others. not necessarily for physical healing but for spiritual healing. soon after his life on earth he died, but they were so inspired by his faith in god that they made a mailbox for every other kid in the world to write letters to god as well and put in ther letters as well. this little boy touched hearts of many people, it imspired them to do the mailbox in honor the boy as well as god being recognized and glorified. lo at the beginnin of the book the mail man was not a believer in god and did not care for much at all but god toiched the mail man' s heart throuh the little boy.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 1, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 15, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 15, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 53 Customer Reviews

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