From the New World: Rassegna di Nuova Musica, Vol. 1

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Uncle Dave Lewis
In the liner notes of Stradivarius' From the New World, Vol. 1, painter Paul Klee is cited as having said he wished he could return to being a newborn baby once more so that he could forget about Europe. "Forgetting about Europe" seems to be the theme of From the New World, Vol. 1, which at first glance appears to be a compilation, but is a condensation of recordings made at three annual festivals held at Macerata, Italy, by the Rassegna di Nuova Musica di Macerata. These events were all exclusively devoted to the work of American composers, although the performers are mostly Italian. Although by nature of what it is, this cannot help but be a mixed bag, From the New ...
See more details below
CD
$18.04
BN.com price
(Save 5%)$18.99 List Price
Other sellers (CD)
  • All (4) from $13.67   
  • New (4) from $13.67   

More About This Product

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Uncle Dave Lewis
In the liner notes of Stradivarius' From the New World, Vol. 1, painter Paul Klee is cited as having said he wished he could return to being a newborn baby once more so that he could forget about Europe. "Forgetting about Europe" seems to be the theme of From the New World, Vol. 1, which at first glance appears to be a compilation, but is a condensation of recordings made at three annual festivals held at Macerata, Italy, by the Rassegna di Nuova Musica di Macerata. These events were all exclusively devoted to the work of American composers, although the performers are mostly Italian. Although by nature of what it is, this cannot help but be a mixed bag, From the New World, Vol. 1, does provide a tantalizing glimpse of what American music means to Europeans, with its examples of wide-ranging experimentalism and the unstated, but palpable notions of "freedom." The recordings are all live from the festival and the sound is not great overall, being a tad quiet and distant, although thankfully there is no applause. On the plus side, there is a terrific performance of Henry Cowell's "The Banshee" by pianist Fausto Bongelli, which at 4:42 is probably the longest interpretation ever released on a recording -- it is truly spooky and very well extrapolated from the score. Another outstanding feature -- and this will likely be the item that proves most appealing to American consumers of this disc -- is Terry Riley performing his own previously unrecorded piece "Beat Sutra #7," a jazzy improvisation designed to fall underneath a reading by Beat poet Michael McClure. The Druckman, Feldman, and Sessions works are heard in decent performances that are somewhat compromised by the distant sound. Trombonist Mike Svoboda arranges three Charles Ives songs for trombone and band, but these fail to get off the ground as the Italian band sounds terribly lax and under-rehearsed, and it appears that whatever source Svoboda used for "Charlie Rutlage" for a musical text was faulty. However, this is not the worst idea on From the New World, Vol. 1 -- that distinctly belongs to Peter Söderberg and Francesco Dillon's arrangement of John Cage's "Dream" for archlute and cello. On paper it sounds like an inspired concept, but a the piece is transposed and b the cello "sustains" pitches while the archlute plays Cage's melody line, a plan that does not work and is not what Cage had in mind at all. Nonetheless, From the New World, Vol. 1, is informative in a way, and does bring a first-rate "Banshee," so to condemn it out of hand wouldn't be fair. But that and the Riley combined mean that only 18 minutes of this hour-long disc is wholly satisfactory, a ratio that might not prove enough for many consumers.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • Release Date: 6/13/2006
  • Label: Stradivarius
  • EAN: 8011570337375
  • Catalog Number: 33737
  • Sales rank: 355,054

Tracks

Disc 1
  1. 1 At the River, song for voice & piano, S. 214 (K. 6B54) - Charles Ives & Michael Svoboda (2:02)
  2. 2 Dynamic Motion. for piano, HC 213/1 - Henry Cowell & Fausto Bongelli (4:18)
  3. 3 Dream, for piano - John Cage & Francesco Dillon (7:26)
  4. 4 The Banshee, for piano strings, HC 405 - Henry Cowell & Fausto Bongelli (4:41)
  5. 5 Valentine for double bass - Jacob Druckman & Stefano Scodanibbio (8:52)
  6. 6 Ilmenau (Over all the treetops), song for voice & piano, S. 272 (K. 6B39a) - Charles Ives & Michael Svoboda (1:43)
  7. 7 A Very Short Trumpet Piece, for trumpet - Morton Feldman & Michael Svoboda (3:51)
  8. 8 Work(s): Beat Sutra - Terry Riley & Terry Riley (11:08)
  9. 9–14 Pieces (6) for cello - Roger Sessions & Lucas Fels (11:18)
  10. 10 Charlie Rutlage, song for voice & piano, S. 226 (K. 6B61a) - Charles Ives & Michael Svoboda (3:13)
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously