From the Parlor to the Altar: Romance and Marriage in the 1800s

Overview

We're all here because of people who met and fell in love in the past! In the 1800s, most young men and women were bound by powerful traditions of family, church, and society that limited their choices in romance and marriage. As an economic and community-building institution marriage options were traditionally controlled by the older generation. Marriages were often arranged by families, and the bride and groom's personal feelings for each other were much less important than they are today. But as in so many ...

See more details below
This Paperback is Not Available through BN.com
Sending request ...

Overview

We're all here because of people who met and fell in love in the past! In the 1800s, most young men and women were bound by powerful traditions of family, church, and society that limited their choices in romance and marriage. As an economic and community-building institution marriage options were traditionally controlled by the older generation. Marriages were often arranged by families, and the bride and groom's personal feelings for each other were much less important than they are today. But as in so many other ways. America was a new and more open society. Communities of people from different and diverse backgrounds were established in a new land, and young people came together in a free, more open environment. Romantic love flourished in the America of the 1800s as it never had before, with a whole variety of courting and marriage customs, many of which we still cherish today.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Judy DaPolito
This examination of the roles of romance and marriage in American society in the 1800s includes a variety of social classes, as well as multiple ethnic, racial, and religious groups. A two-page introduction points out some of the similarities and differences of the nineteenth and twenty-first centuries, and a four-page time line of more than three dozen nineteenth century American events gives the reader a context for the information that follows. The first section of the book, "Changing Times," points out that at the beginning of the period, the primary basis of American marriage was typically an economic arrangement between families of the same social class, race, religion, and ethnicity. At the same time, new ideas of the importance of the individual laid the basis for changes to these traditions. The second section, "The Growth of Romance," begins with the differences between traditional courtship, which takes place mostly within the home, and dating, which permits greater freedom. Courting couples usually got to know each other in the parlor, with the girl's mother present, but poorer girls without parlors might meet men in public places outside their homes. In either case, sex before marriage was forbidden. Native American couples had other traditions, but their courtships also followed rules everyone in the community understood. The third section, "Marriage," considers minimum age for marriage at the time, in many states as young as ten or twelve; polygamy, practiced in Mormon communities and in some utopian societies; slave marriages, which were often broken by the owner's selling the husband or wife; Native American wedding ceremonies; frontier marriages; interracial marriages, outlawed in many states; and married women's rights, a gradual movement from no right to own property to the ability to control it. The book is well illustrated with black and white photographs and full-color paintings. Individuals' stories, both famous and unknown, are scattered through the book. Following the text are a page of discussion questions, a brief glossary, a list of books and Internet sites, and an index. The book is part of the "Daily Life in America in the 1800s" series. Reviewer: Judy DaPolito
Read More Show Less

Product Details

Table of Contents

Introduction 6

Time Line 8

Part I Changing Times 13

Part II The Growth of Romance 29

Part III Marriage 43

Think About It 60

Words Used in This Book 61

Find Out More 62

Index 63

Picture Credits 64

About the Author and the Consultant 64

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)