From the Pilot Factory, 1942 (Centennial of Flight Series, No. 14)

Overview


In 1939, the United States Army Air Force trained just 1,200 new pilots. Yet, by the end of World War II, airfields had become factories, and 193,440 young men had become pilots. Author William P. Mitchell entered the pilot factory at San Antonio’s Kelly Field in January 1942. He then went to Garner Field near Uvalde, Texas, for primary training; to Randolph Field for basic; to Brooks Field for advanced flying; and to Del Valle for transition on the C-47.

Mitchell’s experiences...

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2005 Hard cover New in new dust jacket. Sewn binding. Cloth over boards. 208 p. Contains: Illustrations. Centennial of Flight Series, 14. Audience: General/trade. Hardcover dj, ... new book, still sealed in plastic! b10 Read more Show Less

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Overview


In 1939, the United States Army Air Force trained just 1,200 new pilots. Yet, by the end of World War II, airfields had become factories, and 193,440 young men had become pilots. Author William P. Mitchell entered the pilot factory at San Antonio’s Kelly Field in January 1942. He then went to Garner Field near Uvalde, Texas, for primary training; to Randolph Field for basic; to Brooks Field for advanced flying; and to Del Valle for transition on the C-47.

Mitchell’s experiences were similar to those of thousands of young men. Because his mother kept his wartime letters, readers of this book can catch glimpses of a world long vanished and an era that now seems innocent and naive. Mitchell worried about washing out, but he eventually learned to do nighttime “blitz” landings without lights, to loop and roll and recover from a spin, to identify an aircraft from its silhouette, and to navigate cross country. Like many of his peers, he wanted to be a pursuit pilot, but he was assigned to C-47s, a disappointment to which he resigned himself. As a member of the 73d Squadron of the 434th Troop Carrier Group, he delivered glider infantry at Normandy, dropped airborne troops during Operation Market Garden, and supplied the 101st Airborne Division during the Battle of the Bulge.

Mitchell’s letters remind us that learning to fly was a romantic and unexpected adventure for the young men of the Greatest Generation who flew for the USAAF.

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Editorial Reviews

I.B. Holley
"What we have here is a cleancut American middleclass boy who exemplifies the real strength of the US war effort. I was trained as an aerial gunner not as a pilot but most of what Mitchell depicts resonated with me as right on target. He makes the point that fear of washing out was far more powerful than fear of crashing or getting killed. That is a most important point which is one of the insights which makes this book valuable. . . . a fine example of a decent youngster’s reaction to the great adventure of participating in the high drama of the nation’s role in WW2."—I. B.Holley, Jr., Professor Emeritus, Duke University
I. B.Holley

“What we have here is a cleancut American middleclass boy who exemplifies the real strength of the US war effort. I was trained as an aerial gunner not as a pilot but most of what Mitchell depicts resonated with me as right on target. He makes the point that fear of washing out was far more powerful than fear of crashing or getting killed. That is a most important point which is one of the insights which makes this book valuable. . . . a fine example of a decent youngster’s reaction to the great adventure of participating in the high drama of the nation’s role in WW2.”--I. B.Holley, Jr., Professor Emeritus, Duke University
Air Power History
"From the Pilot Factory is an excellent read that touches on a time when military aviation was in full gear meeting wartime needs through the lens of its product."
Summer 2006
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781585443871
  • Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
  • Publication date: 2/28/2005
  • Series: Centennial of Flight Series, #14
  • Pages: 195
  • Product dimensions: 6.20 (w) x 9.54 (h) x 0.85 (d)

Meet the Author


William P. Mitchell retired in 1992 after a successful career with advertising agencies. He now lives in Hillsborough, North Carolina, and contributes to local newspapers.
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