From Watergate to Monicagate: Ten Controversies in Modern Journalism and Media

From Watergate to Monicagate: Ten Controversies in Modern Journalism and Media

by Herbert N. Foerstel
     
 

Students of media, journalism, and social issues classes will use this book to identify the ten most controversial issues facing the media profession today. Topics include the ever-increasing monopolistic control of the media by conglomerates, tabloid journalism and its impact on the news and plagiarism. Foerstel presents the history of each controversy, important

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Overview

Students of media, journalism, and social issues classes will use this book to identify the ten most controversial issues facing the media profession today. Topics include the ever-increasing monopolistic control of the media by conglomerates, tabloid journalism and its impact on the news and plagiarism. Foerstel presents the history of each controversy, important media personalities, and relevant legislation. Students can examine the current status of the controversy and apply critical thinking skills to make predictions on possible future outcomes.

From the paparazzi to Internet censorship, Foerstel highlights significant controversy in modern journalism and the media, specifically noting recent public outcry over the press' abuse of the private lives of celebrities, including the death of Princess Diana, and problems with plagiarism and the excessive use of anonymous sources. Perhaps the most controversial of all media subjects—the battle over First Amendment rights on the electronic frontier of the Internet—is discussed in depth. With the detail Foerstel offers, students receive an up-to-date look at the struggle between those who advocate censorship of material they deem harmful to minors and those who defend intellectual freedom.

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Editorial Reviews

VOYA
Covering, reporting, manipulating, and interpreting the news are practices that have changed in substance and meaning over the past quarter century. Conglomerates have purchased various news media outlets, blending them in, thus reducing the number of independent investigative eyes and reporting voices. Government agencies have infiltrated the ranks of both reporters and editors. Sensationalism has migrated from grocery store tabloids to newspapers and electronic media that purportedly address serious news gatherers. Word processing and the Internet allow writers to download other writers' copy wholesale to mix it with their own and to mount Web-based proof of fictitious entities who form the basis of their reports. Each of the ten chapters in this insightful study examines a single journalistic crisis, explaining the roots of the problem; identifying the relevant corporate, governmental, or personal players; and offering analysis that gives critical thinkers much to ponder. High school journalism students will find this material both edifying and sobering and would do well to have it as assigned reading. Other teens interested in how propaganda, corporate structuring, and personality each direct and taint the free press will find this book a treasure trove of help when preparing research papers. Both high school and public libraries should have it available as curriculum support and for readers interested in thinking about modern journalism. Index. Photos. Biblio. Source Notes. 2001, Greenwood, 288p. PLB
— Francisca Goldsmith
Library Journal
Do the quality and integrity of journalism suffer when nine corporations control most of the nation's media outlets? Foerstel (Banned in the Media) explores this overarching issue in the first chapter of this thoroughly researched survey. The next seven chapters cover internal and external trends that have eroded the public's faith in the media, from the growing influence of public relations firms to the rise of tabloid journalism. Foerstel then addresses two of the newest media outlets, the Internet and low-power community radio. His chronology of attempts to regulate Internet content is instructive, although it ends before the introduction and passage of the latest filtering mandate. During the discussion of microradio, as in some of the earlier chapters, Foerstel reveals a decidedly anti-corporate bias, but he cites plenty of documentation to support his stance. An excellent starting point for student research, this book will also be an eye-opener for anyone who may not realize the extent of corporate and governmental influence on the media. For all academic and public libraries. Susan M. Colowick, North Olympic Lib. Syst., Port Angeles, WA Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Booknews
Despite the title, the subject here is not scandals but controversies about the print and broadcast news media. Librarian Foerstel, currently on the Board for the National Security Archives chose ten controversies to look at based on their journalistic significance, timeliness, and historical depth. He says that the first, monopolistic control of journalism, is largely responsible for the others, which include press controls in time of war, from plagiarism to polemics, anonymous sources, and microradio's challenge. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780313311635
Publisher:
ABC-CLIO, Incorporated
Publication date:
06/28/2001
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
288
Product dimensions:
6.14(w) x 9.21(h) x 0.69(d)

Meet the Author

HERBERT N. FOERSTEL is the former Head of Branch Libraries at the University of Maryland, College Park. He currently serves on the Board of Directors for the National Security Archives. He is the author of seven previous books for Greenwood Publishing, including Banned in the Media (1998).

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