The Frontier in American Culture / Edition 1

Paperback (Print)
Rent
Rent from BN.com
$8.45
(Save 75%)
Est. Return Date: 09/30/2014
Buy New
Buy New from BN.com
$33.95
Buy Used
Buy Used from BN.com
$25.46
(Save 25%)
Item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging.
Condition: Used – Good details
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $1.99
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 94%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (24) from $1.99   
  • New (5) from $29.55   
  • Used (19) from $1.99   

Overview


Log cabins and wagon trains, cowboys and Indians, Buffalo Bill and General Custer. These and other frontier images pervade our lives, from fiction to films to advertising, where they attach themselves to products from pancake syrup to cologne, blue jeans to banks. Richard White and Patricia Limerick join their inimitable talents to explore our national preoccupation with this uniquely American image.

Richard White examines the two most enduring stories of the frontier, both told in Chicago in 1893, the year of the Columbian Exposition. One was Frederick Jackson Turner's remarkably influential lecture, "The Significance of the Frontier in American History"; the other took place in William "Buffalo Bill" Cody's flamboyant extravaganza, "The Wild West." Turner recounted the peaceful settlement of an empty continent, a tale that placed Indians at the margins. Cody's story put Indians—and bloody battles—at center stage, and culminated with the Battle of the Little Bighorn, popularly known as "Custer's Last Stand." Seemingly contradictory, these two stories together reveal a complicated national identity.

Patricia Limerick shows how the stories took on a life of their own in the twentieth century and were then reshaped by additional voices—those of Indians, Mexicans, African-Americans, and others, whose versions revisit the question of what it means to be an American.

Generously illustrated, engagingly written, and peopled with such unforgettable characters as Sitting Bull, Captain Jack Crawford, and Annie Oakley, The Frontier in American Culture reminds us that despite the divisions and denials the western movement sparked, the image of the frontier unites us in surprising ways.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
White and Limerick analyze some of the most pervasive images of the American West, many of which are represented in a show of the same name at Chicago's Newberry Library this fall. In his contribution ``Frederick Jackson Turner and Buffalo Bill,'' White compares Turner, the distinguished historian who first contended that the notion of the frontier was the driving force of American history and culture, and Buffalo Bill Cody, the Wild West performer, who both appeared in Chicago in 1893. It's hard to believe the two are representing the same terrain: Turner's presentation emphasized settlers idyllically filling a near-empty continent with a few peripheral Indians, while Buffalo Bill's re-enactments were of bloody conflicts with murderous natives. Limerick's ``Adventures of the Frontier in the Twentieth Century'' is incisive and often wry-as is only appropriate for an historian who begins her catalogue of Western images at Disney's Frontierland. Limerick goes on to examine the shameless use of frontier/pioneer images in everything from politics to advertising. At the turn of the century, the frontier was defined as that point at which people were scarce, or as White states, ``where white people were scarce''-with Limerick adding, ``where white people got scared because they were scarce.'' Both scholars look at how the frontier influenced interactions between whites and Native Americans, Hispanics, Asians and African Americans, ultimately creating a real melting pot that, maintains Limerick, made the idea of the frontier a ``cultural glue'' holding Americans together. (Oct.)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780520088443
  • Publisher: University of California Press
  • Publication date: 10/17/1994
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 116
  • Sales rank: 997,636
  • Product dimensions: 6.88 (w) x 9.88 (h) x 0.25 (d)

Meet the Author


Richard White is McClelland Professor of Pacific Northwest History at the University of Washington. Patricia Nelson Limerick is Professor of History at the University of Colorado. James R. Grossman is Director of the Dr. William M. Scholl Center for Family and Community History at the Newberry Library in Chicago.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction 1
Frederick Jackson Turner and Buffalo Bill 7
The Adventures of the Frontier in the Twentieth Century 67
Checklist of Materials Exhibited 103
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)