×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Frontier
     

Frontier

by Matt Neuburg
 

Of course you love your Mac, but don't you wish you could program it yourself? Instead of looking for an application that does what you need, what if you could write a program to concatenate files, change file-types, munge text? What if you could automate repetitive processes, and tie existing applications together: Have QuarkXPress construct a whole

Overview

Of course you love your Mac, but don't you wish you could program it yourself? Instead of looking for an application that does what you need, what if you could write a program to concatenate files, change file-types, munge text? What if you could automate repetitive processes, and tie existing applications together: Have QuarkXPress construct a whole catalog based on a FileMaker database, or have Clip2GIF transform all the PICTs in a Microsoft Word file into GIFs? What if you could send email without an email program, or download Web pages without a browser? What if you could control remote computers across a network? What if you could beef up your Web site by writing your own CGI scripts, or by generating hundreds of related Web pages automatically? With UserLand Frontier, you can do all this and more. What is Frontier?

  • It's a simple but sophisticated scripting language (UserTalk), with speed that blows AppleScript away and a far easier learning curve — plus it's multi-threaded and includes an elegant debugging environment.
  • It's an integrated database with instant access to data, text, outlines, and tables.
  • It's a totally automated environment, where scripts can create dialogs, open windows, edit text, alter menus.
  • It's a hook to the system, able to read and write files, open documents, read the clipboard.
  • It's a base for sending and receiving Apple events, so it can drive any scriptable application and can be integrated into other scripting applications.
  • It's a network application, able to function as a client or server over AppleTalk or the Internet.
  • It's a powerful scripting environment for Web site management and system level scripting.
Frontier: The Definitive Guide is the first book devoted exclusively to teaching and documenting this wonderful program. With it, you can learn all about Frontier or find out about just those aspects that interest you. Whether you're a complete Frontier beginner or an experienced hand in need of a clear, ordered reference, this book is for you.Packed with examples, advice, tricks and tips, Frontier: The Definitive Guide teaches you Frontier from the ground up. Even if you've never programmed before, you'll be cranking out Web pages or writing your own custom scripts in no time. Before you know it, you'll have joined the ranks of thousands of Macintosh power users who make Frontier their "home base."Covers Frontier 4.2.3 for the Macintosh.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781565923836
Publisher:
O'Reilly Media, Incorporated
Publication date:
03/08/1998
Pages:
616
Product dimensions:
7.06(w) x 9.16(h) x 1.10(d)

Meet the Author

Matt Neuburg started programming computers in 1968, when he was 14 years old, as a member of a literally underground high school club, which met once a week to do timesharing on a bank of PDP-10s by way of primitive teletype machines. He also occasionally used Princeton University's IBM-360/67, but gave it up in frustration when one day he dropped his punch cards. He majored in Greek at Swarthmore College, and received his Ph.D. from Cornell University in 1981, writing his doctoral dissertation (about Aeschylus) on a mainframe. He proceeded to teach Classical languages, literature, and culture at many well-known institutions of higher learning, most of which now disavow knowledge of his existence, and to publish numerous scholarly articles unlikely to interest anyone. Meanwhile he obtained an Apple IIc and became hopelessly hooked on computers again, migrating to a Macintosh in 1990. He wrote some educational and utility freeware, became an early regular contributor to the online journal TidBITS, and in 1995 left academe to edit MacTech Magazine. He is also the author of Frontier: The Definitive Guide and REALbasic: The Definitive Guide. In August 1996 he became a freelancer, which means he has been looking for work ever since. He is the author of Frontier: The Definitive Guide and REALbasic: The Definitive Guide, both for O'Reilly & Associates.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews