Froodle

Froodle

5.0 1
by Antoinette Portis
     
 

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In a normal neighborhood, on a typical day, the birds chirp, the dogs bark and the cats meow. When Little Brown Bird decides she doesn't want to sing the same old song, out comes a new tune that shakes up the neighborhood and changes things forever in this funny, innovative book that kids will love to read outloud.

A Neal Porter Book

Overview

In a normal neighborhood, on a typical day, the birds chirp, the dogs bark and the cats meow. When Little Brown Bird decides she doesn't want to sing the same old song, out comes a new tune that shakes up the neighborhood and changes things forever in this funny, innovative book that kids will love to read outloud.

A Neal Porter Book

Editorial Reviews

The New York Times - Sarah Harrison Smith
Portis has a clever ear: She finds many little puns to keep the story light and witty…Using pencil, charcoal and ink, with digitally applied color, Portis…gives her illustrations a layered look, with contrasting expanses of flat color and more nuanced dappled and shaded areas describing trees, grass and shrubbery…The animals, with the simple look of silk-screened figures, are heavily outlined in black, and appear superimposed on their backgrounds. These playful juxtapositions bring visual energy to the story, which is, after all, about delighting in difference.
From the Publisher

“A goofily garrulous story session.” —BCCB

“The big, bold speech balloons filled with irrestistible nonsense words make this a great choice for shared read-alouds.” —Booklist

“With its suburban setting and palette of pale blues and eau de nil, there's a subtle retro feel to this celebration of playful remarks.” —Wall Street Journal

“Portis's fun story is filled with humor and silly rhyming words that both children and adults will appreciate.” —School Library Journal

“The creator of A Penguin Story (2009) returns with another imaginative solution to monotony and predictability in the natural world... "The neighborhood was never the same," the narrator reports, and neither will be the charmed listeners and readers of this cheerful inivation to invention.” —Kirkus Reviews, STARRED REVIEW

“Portis, whose Not a Box proposed alternative uses for a cardboard cube and whose A Penguin Story imagined how Antarctic birds regard non-wintry colors, delights in 'What if?' questions.” —Publishers Weekly

“Be preapared for "Oobly snooby!" and "Cloggen Zoggen Itsyboggen!" after the book is finished” —Publishers Weekly

Children's Literature - Susan R. Shaffner
Is your life routine? Little Brown Bird’s is, until one day she decides she will not sing the same old song. Her silliness is frowned upon by Crow, but soon Cardinal and even peace-loving Dove are being silly, too. Crow leaves the area in protest, but soon returns to experiment with silly rhymes. At the end of the book, nonconformity has spread to all the birds in the neighborhood, and even the dogs and cats are now rhyming. Much of the story is written in speech balloons, a favorite of beginning readers. Portis’s illustrations are clear and simple and easily copied by young artists. Teachers may use this book to encourage shy kids to take a risk, to start discussions about creativity, to enhance rhyming skills, and to make students aware of various specific bird sounds. Portis’s book could be compared to and contrasted with a beginning science book about birds. On a few pages, the text gets a bit lost in the background illustration. Puns and the concept of olive branches denoting “peace” may need to be explained. Reviewer: Susan R. Shaffner; Ages 3 to 6.
School Library Journal
05/01/2014
PreS-K—All of the birds say, "caw," "coo," "chip," or "peep," except Little Brown Bird, who wants to try something different. She finds it more enjoyable to say things like, "Froodle sproodle" and "Tiffle biffle,/just a little/miffle!" Crow is annoyed, especially when the other birds join in, but who could resist participating in fun like this? Portis's fun story is filled with humor and silly rhyming words that both children and adults will appreciate. The detailed illustrations, done in a glowing palette of pencil, charcoal, and ink, are featured on multiple spreads throughout the book. Although the narrative text is small and gets lost in a sea of grass or bushes at times, the birds' speech balloons are bold and provide a great opportunity for children to practice sounding out words (even if they are made up). The cadence of the birds' dialogue might take a few read-throughs to get used to, but that will only provide more laughs in the meantime. This book will work in many settings and is certain to prompt giggles from young audiences.—Megan Egbert, Meridian Library District, ID
Kirkus Reviews
★ 2014-03-12
When Little Brown Bird decides to sing something silly, most birds in the neighborhood follow her lead, but crows can't be silly, can they? The creator of A Penguin Story (2009) returns with another imaginative solution to monotony and predictability in the natural world. "All year long," the narration begins, "…the birds in the neighborhood went...." The words "caw," "coo," "chip" and "peep" repeat in speech bubbles, varied only in the order of their appearance. Then, one day, Little Brown Bird tries something new. "Froodle sproodle!" extends across a lengthy spread, its font emphasizing the shocking surprise. On the next spread, matched in magnitude, an unamused crow stares down at the miscreant, but Little Brown Bird can't resist. Soon, Cardinal and Dove are experimenting, too. As the silliness spreads, the story actually turns sideways for a moment, forcing readers to physically rotate the book 90 degrees. Repeat listeners will gleefully join in with the rhyming dialogue bubbles. The mixed-media illustrations created with pencil, charcoal and ink and with digitally added color are made up of simple and stylized images, but the birds are recognizable. "The neighborhood was never the same," the narrator reports, and neither will be the charmed listeners and readers of this cheerful invitation to invention. (Picture book. 4-7)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781466869516
Publisher:
Roaring Brook Press
Publication date:
05/06/2014
Sold by:
Macmillan
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
32
File size:
13 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Antoinette Portis is the author of many inventive books, including Not a Box, a New York Times Best Illustrated Book and a Geisel Honor Book. She is the recipient of a Sendak Fellowship. Froodle is her first book for Roaring Brook Press. Ms. Portis lives in southern California.
Antoinette Portis is the author of many inventive books, including Not a Box, a New York Times Best Illustrated Book and a Geisel Honor Book. She is the recipient of a Sendak Fellowship. Froodle is her first book for Roaring Brook Press. Ms. Portis lives in southern California.

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Froodle 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
jb70 More than 1 year ago
Recent library find that has been requested to be read repeatedly at our house. All the birds in the neighborhood start out saying the same thing over and over again until the Little Brown Bird says something different. The sounds the birds make as they are freed from their rigid rules are hilarious and inventive. As soon a we reach the end my son asks to read it again and says the words along with the birds.