Frost

Frost

4.1 14
by Wendy Delsol, Julia Whelan
     
 

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In this sequel to STORK, Katla Leblanc has to employ her grit, spirit, and special gifts to rescue the boy she loves.

After the drama of finding out that she's a Stork, a member of an ancient and mystical order of women, and that her boyfriend, Jack, is a descendent of the Winter People able to control the weather, Katla Leblanc is delighted when all signs

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Overview

In this sequel to STORK, Katla Leblanc has to employ her grit, spirit, and special gifts to rescue the boy she loves.

After the drama of finding out that she's a Stork, a member of an ancient and mystical order of women, and that her boyfriend, Jack, is a descendent of the Winter People able to control the weather, Katla Leblanc is delighted when all signs point to a busy and peaceful Christmas. That is, until the snowstorm Jack summons as a gift to Katla turns into the storm of the century, attracting Brigid, a gorgeous scientist who, in turn, attracts Jack. Between the school play, a bedridden, pregnant mother's to-do lists, and keeping an eye on her aging grandfather, Katla doesn't have time to question Brigid's motives or deal with Jack's increasingly cold behavior. But Katla's suspicions mount when Jack joins Brigid on a research expedition to Greenland, and when the two of them go missing, it becomes clear that Katla is the only one who can save her beloved Jack from the Snow Queen who holds him prisoner. Adventure, romance, and myth combine in this winter escapade for teens who like a bit of fire with their ice.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Well-paced narration will keep readers interested - a superior paranormal adventure.
—Kirkus Reviews

Readers discover that, somehow, Kat can make the most frightening danger seem, well...fun. This light tone makes the novel a favorable choice for girls who prefer Meg Cabot to Stephanie Meyer.
—VOYA

VOYA - Diane Colson
Katla Leblanc begins her story with the breezy announcement that she is a Stork, a magical Norse being who delivers lost souls. This may sound startling to readers who missed Kat in Delsol's previous novel, Stork (Candlewick, 2010/VOYA December 2010), but returning readers will be happy to know that Kat is as wryly observant and fashion conscious as ever. Kat and her boyfriend, Jack Frost, are settling nicely into their romance. Yet, as anyone with ancient mystical powers can tell you, peace is invariably short lived. A terrible blizzard, possibly initiated by Jack, kills a young boy. The Storks are in disarray. Kat's mother's boyfriend, Stanley, becomes involved in a secretive project to end global warming, employing Jack as an eager assistant. Into this uneasy turmoil strides Brigid, an uber-glamorous scientist who will work closely—too closely, in Kat's opinion—with Stanley and Jack. When Stanley, Jack, and Brigid leave to continue the work in Greenland, tragedy soon follows. And, of course, the irrepressible Kat follows as well. Readers discover that, somehow, Kat can make the most frightening danger seem, well . . . fun. This light tone makes the novel a favorable choice for girls who prefer Meg Cabot to Stephanie Meyer. While there is little depth to the characters, the action is nonstop, buoyed by Kat's eye-rolling, witty commentary. If your library already has Stork, you must buy this sequel. It could stand alone, but new readers may feel as if they have walked into the tail end of a party. Reviewer: Diane Colson
VOYA - Katherine Flinn
Frost, the sequel to Stork, is a strong book, and though it is a sequel, it can also be a stand-alone book. The characters are really captivating, and the plot seems realistic. This book is written like real life. It was hard to put down, even during class. Readers will really worry about the characters because they seem so genuine. Reviewer: Katherine Flinn, Teen Reviewer
School Library Journal
Gr 7 Up—This modern-day retelling of Hans Christian Andersen's "Snow Queen" picks up where it left off in Stork (Candlewick, 2010), with plenty of backstory included. Kat is adjusting to her membership in the ancient Stork society that delivers souls and is still enamored with her boyfriend, Jack, descended from Jack Frost, who can control the weather. Together, their powers often have disastrous results, like an out-of-control snowstorm on Christmas Eve. The storm catches the attention of Brigid, a beautiful foreign researcher, who takes an unusual interest in Jack. Kat is suspicious of his obsession with her but is caught up in her role in the school play, managing her Stork responsibilities, and taking care of her pregnant mom. However, when Brigid takes Jack to Greenland for a field study and they go missing, Kat risks everything to save the boy she loves. The continued growth of bold and determined Kat is endearing as she develops her life-giving Stork abilities while still being a fashion-focused teenager in a small Minnesota town. The underlying themes of culture and heritage affecting the present and the motivating and empowering nature of love, even in impossible situations, complement the quick-moving plot and beautifully drawn settings of Minnesota, Greenland, and Iceland. Frost sustains the momentum of the first book and effectively sets the stage for the final installment in the trilogy.—Elizabeth C. Johnson, Fort Vancouver Regional Library, WA
School Library Journal - Audio
Gr 8 Up—Wendy Delsol's sequel (2011) to Stork (2010, both Candlewick) finds high school junior Katla LeBlanc dancing in the school play ("The Snow Queen"), immersed in the high school newspaper, enthralled with her boyfriend Jack (a descendent of Jack Frost who can affect changes in the weather), and juggling her duties as a "Soul Deliverer" while working at her grandfather's store. When Brigid, a beautiful and mysterious environmental scientist, comes to Minnesota to research climate change, she charms everyone except Kat, who is dismayed to find Jack spending most of his time with her. Things go from bad to worse during Jack's research trip to Greenland when Brigid kidnaps him and forces him to manipulate the weather. Kat goes after him in a thrilling, suspense-filled adventure. Kat is a strong, likeable teenager—her fashion sense and pop references supply comic relief. Norse folklore is woven within the story, giving it the feel of a contemporary fairy tale. Although back-story is included, a familiarity with the previous title will help listeners understand the paranormal powers of the Storks. Julia Whelan portrays Kat's teenage angst perfectly and handles the other voices competently. This retelling of The Snow Queen is a must-have where the first title is popular. Listeners will eagerly await the final book in the trilogy.—Julie Paladino, East Chapel Hill High School, NC

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781455829422
Publisher:
Brilliance Audio
Publication date:
10/11/2011
Series:
Stork Trilogy Series, #2
Edition description:
Unabridged
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 5.50(h) x 0.80(d)
Age Range:
12 - 14 Years

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
Well-paced narration will keep readers interested - a superior paranormal adventure.
—Kirkus Reviews

Readers discover that, somehow, Kat can make the most frightening danger seem, well...fun. This light tone makes the novel a favorable choice for girls who prefer Meg Cabot to Stephanie Meyer.
—VOYA

Meet the Author

Wendy Delsol is the author of Stork and Frost, the prequels to Flock. She is a freelance writer who has lived in Detroit, Paris, Nice, and Los Angeles and now resides in Des Moines, Iowa.

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Frost 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is the second book in the Stork series and I liked it as much as the first. This time around you get to go to Iceland and learn a little bit about the culture. Kat the main characters Grandpa grew up there and he takes her to a yearly festival in the town. There she gets her fortune read and must go on a Journey to save her boyfriend and potentially the world after she finds out dangerous information.
Truly_Bookish More than 1 year ago
Stork was such a cool book. Katla, the main character, was a spunky girl who was struggling in a fish out of water situation after moving from stylish California to cold Minnesota. The book was a really fun read and I loved the Norse mythology, not something that find a lot of in YA. Additionally, the romance between Kat and Jack is so sweet! Frost is an equally fun read. Portions of the story - the main storyline featuring Jack, Kat and Brigid - is based on Hans Christian Anderson's The Snow Queen and had wonderful fairytale-like quality to it. The story takes place in Minnesota, Iceland and Greenland and I love Ms. Delsol's vivid descriptions of Icelandic folklore. Frost has a lot more going on than Stork did and at times, I wondered how the author was going to pull all the sub-plots together, but she does so very nicely in the end. I love Kat's voice. Even though she still a bit snarky, she is also more mature in this book. As with many second books in a series, Jack and Kat's relationship is tested and we don't get to see them together as much as I would like. I also wanted more of the Stork Society and I hope we will see more of the Storks in the next book in the series. I'm really hoping there will be another book because while Frost does not end with a cliffhanger, it does a great job of setting up some storylines that I hoping will get resolved in the next book. Frost has a very satisfying ending and I recommend this series to anyone looking for something fun and different from the usual YA offerings of vamps, faeries, wolves and the ever increasing amount of Greek demigods we have been seeing lately. Content: Kissing and violence.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Back but i may have to leave again
eternalised More than 1 year ago
The story is inspired by the Snow Queen, one of my all-time favorite fairytales. I liked the first book, “Spork” a lot, because it had tons of original elements and although paranormal, it gave a refreshing twist to the concept. The sequel was a bit more predictable, but the Nordic folk stories were very intriguing, like the frost giants. Katla’s new skills are a little over the top though, and with the whole new range of skills, it just seems like too much. I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Is that jinky on the cover? Awsome! Awsome book to read. Not like the other supernatural books. But a fun book to read as a family.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Jumps oon snowstar leabe her aone or there will be bloodshed
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
IceClns elders den.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Regina_Linton More than 1 year ago
Fun, inventive and delightful. Great fun to be had reading this fantastic sequel. Katla is trying something new when she takes time out of her stork life to try out for the school play. She sings and dances. Jack is there to encourage her but she still feels like she is not up to the task. When Jack is encouraged to go on an expedition to help him learn ways to control his power, Katla is jealous and is terrified when she finds out why he is missing. Great YA Paranormal read.
TeensReadToo More than 1 year ago
Jack and Kat are finally enjoying having a normal relationship. Until Kat's wish of a white Christmas comes true, thanks to Jack's weather-altering abilities. This change in climate attracts a beautiful environmental researcher. Brigid puts together a team that consists of Jack and Kat's soon-to-be stepfather (and the dad of her soon-to-be new half-sister), Stanley. Boys are infatuated with Brigid. But Kat's not convinced. She knows something is wrong. Jack becomes distant, and when the group takes a trip to Greenland, disaster strikes and he and Brigid end up missing. Kat must find a way to get to Jack and save the world from a freezing disaster. I really enjoyed reading STORK and its sequel, FROST. Once again, I just loved Kat's humor. There were so many times I found myself laughing out loud at things she said or thought. A lot of them were totally sarcastic things that I would think or say. I liked that the book was based off of The Snow Queen story. And I liked the irony of Kat being in the school production of that same tale. But it bothered me how she was in the play, yet didn't connect what was happening in her life to the show she was putting on. It was so obvious to me! And I still liked Jack and Kat's relationship. It seemed so sweet and like a true first love. But I didn't feel that it was over the top. Just how I like it. FROST is the second book in a trilogy, and I can't wait for the third book!
Icecream18 More than 1 year ago
Frost is the much awaited sequel to Stork. The novel is loosely based on Hans Christian Andersen's The Snow Queen. The main focus of attention in this novel is Jack, Katla's boyfriend. This may be slightly disappointing to readers who were expecting further development of Katla. Jack has a fierce desire to understand and control his own magical ability. Jack and Katla are slowly beginning to have a deeper relationship when Brigid arrives on the scene. Brigid comes to Minnesota due to a gift from Jack to Katla gone awry. Brigid draws Jack's attention away from Katla; not long after Brigid's arrival, Jack disappears. Katla must go on a mission to find him. The novel continues in much the same way-Katla trying to find Jack. For readers of Stork who were expecting a deeper development of Katla's ability and a better explanation of the Stork society...this book is a bit of a letdown. The novel literally focuses on her finding Jack, there is only one instance where she guides a soul in the entire novel. There is more attention given to the love triangle between Brigid, Jack, and Katla than there is to the ancient historical Story society that was the first novel's plot. However, the author's way of drawing the reader into the book and holding his/her attention and the seamless, flowing sequence of events are still present. The author does not neglect Katla's character development-she is portrayed as a slightly more mature, humorous young woman. The reader will find him/herself laughing at Katla's thoughts and statements during the novel. Brigid is a new character and the perfect character to hate in this novel. She is haughty and self-assured with an undertone of evil. The author does a good job at giving a teen's point of view (Katla's) during the novel-not the easiest thing to do when you're not a teenager anymore and another demonstration of the author's skill. This novel splits off into smaller sub-plots. Again, some readers may enjoy this new quality to this series while some may dislike it. Katla's mother, newly pregnant, deals with the stress of preparing for another child, Katla's class puts on a musical of The Snow Queen- the author's bid for irony in the novel. Katla's friends aren't getting along and Katla isn't quite sure if she has time to deal with everything. Jack veers away from Katla and their relationship. The Stork society isn't addressed all that much. Katla takes off to find Jack, but at the same time has to deal with a few things that leave her having nightmares. All of these different sub-plots are a little grating at first, they don't appear to fit cohesively into the novel at first. However, the ending is satisfying and many of these events fall into place. This book is recommended for young adults/teens that enjoy escaping to a world where magic is possible when reading. 3 1/2 Stars
Readergirl_Reviews More than 1 year ago
Let me start out by saying that I really loved Stork, so I was really excited about reading the sequel. Although I did enjoy the book, all in all, I felt that it didn't quite live up to my expectations. Delsol's writing was just as good as I remember, and the characters just as likeable, but at the same time, I felt like there were so many missed opportunities in this book to further develop them, and their individual storylines. I always have a hard time with storylines where some chic comes along to derail the hero from his rightful path away from the heroine. It frustrates me so much as I read, that sometimes that frustration becomes irritation, and I find that I can't enjoy things very much. This occurs a bit in Frost, as Brigid comes along and kind of ruins, to an extent, the twosome of Jack and Katla that was created in Stork. I get antsy when so much time and distance starts occuring between two characters that are supposed to be together, at least when it appears that it's unnecessary. I felt Jack could have involved Katla more rather than Brigid. I also wish a bit more emphasis had been placed on the folklore, as it had been in the first story. Despite all of that, however, Delsol is still a great storyteller, and the characters were still the same likeable ones I fell in love with in Stork. I am not sorry I read it and did enjoy it. I do look forward to future books by Wendy Delsol.