Fuckness

( 6 )

Overview

This darkly offbeat novel opens with the narrator, Wallace Black, as the target of the school bully's violence. After suffering a horrendous beating, Black goes home to his equally abusive family. As a punishment for fighting at school, his mother straps a set of grotesque horns to the top of his head. He is unsure of where the horns came from. They have always been in the house. And they contain a power no one could have expected.

Let Andersen Prunty (ZEROSTRATA, MORNING IS ...

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Overview

This darkly offbeat novel opens with the narrator, Wallace Black, as the target of the school bully's violence. After suffering a horrendous beating, Black goes home to his equally abusive family. As a punishment for fighting at school, his mother straps a set of grotesque horns to the top of his head. He is unsure of where the horns came from. They have always been in the house. And they contain a power no one could have expected.

Let Andersen Prunty (ZEROSTRATA, MORNING IS DEAD, and THE BEARD) guide you through a sometimes hilarious, sometimes violent and terrifying coming-of-age Midwestern gothic novel.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780982628140
  • Publisher: Atlatl Press
  • Publication date: 8/31/2011
  • Pages: 206
  • Sales rank: 610,671
  • Product dimensions: 5.25 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.47 (d)

Meet the Author

Andersen Prunty is an American fiction writer. In 2006 he won an online contest sponsored by The Harrow and judged blindly by Ramsey Campbell and Brian Keene for his story "Rayles." His first book, a collection of weird little stories called THE OVERWHELMING URGE, was published in 2008 by Eraserhead Press. In 2009, two of his books (THE OVERWHELMING URGE and ZEROSTRATA) were nominated for the Wonderland Book Award. He is also the author of MY FAKE WAR, MORNING IS DEAD, and THE BEARD, among others. His horror novel, THE SORROW KING, will be released in late April 2011. He currently lives with his wife in Dayton, Ohio. Visit him on the web at www.andersenprunty.com or contact him via email at
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 6 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(4)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

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2 Star

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1 Star

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 5 of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 15, 2013

    Test

    F<_>uck

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 3, 2012

    To sasha

    So what did u say on the other book?

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 31, 2012

    Res

    Yeah

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 30, 2012

    Sierra

    DONT FORGET ME IN 8TH RESULT

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 6, 2011

    F---ness is all the awkward griminess of your teenage years writ large in true bizarro style.

    The story of a young boy growing up in Prunty's familiar landscape of twisted, industrial Ohio, horribly abused by parents, teachers and his fellow students alike, F---ness' hero makes Oliver Twist look like a celebrity adoptee by comparison. But, going along with the way Prunty plays with the genre, there is nothing particularly special about Wallace Black. In fact, he's had to repeat the 8th grade a few times. Not that that helps him any in dealing with the kids around him, in fact his emotional and physical development seems to have stopped a few years before.

    Wally talks a lot about the titular "F---ness" - an amorphous mass of everything that can make life bad, a cross between bad luck and a curse that is like a fog surrounding him and pressing him down. Prunty does a good job through the main character of making this seem less like classic teenage angst and self-pity and creates the F---ness as a mysterious, malevolent force that is always waiting just over the next hill to crush our hero. It's never made clear and Wally never has any kind of apocalyptic confrontation with it, which is why the device works so well - it's all the horrible feelings of adolescence made into a force of nature.

    Not that you could blame Wally for feeling bad for himself. After a particularly horrible beat-down at school, prompted by his cringe-worthy encounter with a backstabbing vixen over a piece of candy, Wally returns home to endure the horrible punishments of his parents. Quite a bit of the early parts of the book are devoted to the fiendishness of these punishments, from things like not letting Wally sleep in a bed to making him mow the lawn with a lawn mower that is more a death-device than a yard tool. As final punishment for being sent home from school as as "molester", Wally mother affixes a set of ugly horns to his head with a leather belt.

    But the horns have a terrible, mysterious power, and this is what sets Wally on his journey through the rusted-out wasteland of his hometown and out to the wild, beautiful countryside. Along the way he will have been cut off from everything in his life, and totally alone, he falls in with other drifters, bums and losers as they all try to make their own way in a world that doesn't seem to be made for them.

    Prunty does a great job of not giving you what you'd expect, but giving you something more enjoyable instead without straining the reality he's created. As usual Prunty's world is well-defined in it's weirdness, and the childlike quality of the way Wally and the people he meets live and interact in the world is heightened by the books YA feel (the pee race scene is hilarious). You almost never know what to expect because it seems like anything is possible, from flying bicycles to mass murder. And not just that - but maybe Wally doesn't know as much about his life and his family as he thinks he did. That to me was a real treat and what sets the book apart from the YA genre crap I keep comparing it to.

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 5 of 6 Customer Reviews

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