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Fug You: An Informal History of the Peace Eye Bookstore, the Fuck You Press, the Fugs, and Counterculture in the Lower East Side
     

Fug You: An Informal History of the Peace Eye Bookstore, the Fuck You Press, the Fugs, and Counterculture in the Lower East Side

2.7 4
by Ed Sanders
 

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Fug You is Ed Sanders's unapologetic and often hilarious account of eight key years of "total assault on the culture," to quote his novelist friend William S. Burroughs.

Fug You traces the flowering years of New York's downtown bohemia in the sixties, starting with the marketing problems presented by publishing Fuck You / A Magazine of the

Overview

Fug You is Ed Sanders's unapologetic and often hilarious account of eight key years of "total assault on the culture," to quote his novelist friend William S. Burroughs.

Fug You traces the flowering years of New York's downtown bohemia in the sixties, starting with the marketing problems presented by publishing Fuck You / A Magazine of the Arts, as it faced the aboveground's scrutiny, and leading to Sanders's arrest after a raid on his Peace Eye Bookstore. The memoir also traces the career of the Fugs—formed in 1964 by Sanders and his neighbor, the legendary Tuli Kupferberg (called "the world's oldest living hippie" by Allen Ginsberg)—as Sanders strives to find a home for this famous postmodern, innovative anarcho-folk-rock band in the world of record labels.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Sanders, best known for his 1971 book on the Charles Manson murders (The Family), engagingly depicts how the culture of New York City in the 1960s shifted from the beats to the hippies. In this “book of remembrances” as he “surged through the decade on my own little missions,” Sanders has chosen “to accentuate the energy, the wild fun, the joyful creativity, and the schemes of Better World derring-do.” He tells many stories about his work with such friends as Allen Ginsberg, Jonas Mekas, Charles Olson, and Abbie Hoffman—and provides his own fascinating perspective on the birth and trial of the Chicago Seven. Sanders includes a detailed history of his Peace Eye Bookstore, which played a crucial role as the epicenter of the counterculture of New York’s Lower East Side (and has served as a model for every underground bookstore since). Above all, it means a generous helping of stories about Sanders’s band the Fugs, whose visionary combination of “poetry, satire, and antiwar fervor” on such albums as “It Crawled Into My Hand, Honest,” is now considered truly revolutionary. (Jan.)
From the Publisher
“This brilliant memoir not only chronicles the band's early days, but paints an outrageous, inspiring picture of life among the artistic outlaws of New York's Lower East side in the '60's.”

New York Post, 12/11/11
“Sanders…brings us back to those idealistic days.”

Baltimore Sun, 12/8/11
“In short, impressionistic chapters, Sanders details his adventures, as well as his encounters with seemingly everyone who was anyone in the Beat and hippie scenes…Sanders provides a fly-on-the-wall view of many facets of a turbulent decade.”

Metro Focus, 12/13/11 “In addition to Sanders' enlightening personal take on New York in the '60s, the pages of Fug You are lined with wonderful gems from the poet's personal archive. Between the covers the reader will discover doodles by the likes of Burroughs and Sanders himself, rare Fugs concert photos and flyers, many drawings of cannabis leaves, intimate shots of Allen Ginsberg and other demented, wonderful esoterica.”

New World Review, Vol. 5, Num. 28
“At its best, Fug You evokes the wide-eyed spirit of adolescence, with its delusions of purity and heartbreaking enthusiasm and dynamism.”

Huffington Post, 1/3/12

Village Voice, 11/29/11
“[A] vivid memoir of the decade…Today's Occupy Wall Street movement can take, if not a lesson, at least inspiration (and perhaps solace) from Sanders's triumphs and travails.”

Publishers Weekly, 12/12/11
“[Sanders] engagingly depicts how the culture of New York City in the 1960s shifted from the beats to the hippies.”

PopMatters.com, 12/5/11
“Sanders tells the story in a series of vignettes that are sometimes funny, occasionally frightening, and typically littered with the names of The Famous and The Dead…In the end this is a work that recalls with vivid and loving detail the haphazard glory of those wild, wild bygone times.”

Hartford Advocate, 12/7/11
“Sanders ties all of his earliest threads—up to 1970—together in the most engagingly idiosyncratic memoir of the year…Indeed, now that his friend and mentor Allen Ginsberg is dead, Ed Sanders is the strongest living link between the Beat Generation, the hippies and all other underground currents that have trickled along the countercultural pipeline since then.”

High Times, February 2011

Kirkus Reviews
A memoir about the 1960s that reflects the slapdash spirit of that decade's underground press. Sanders is a writer of renown and accomplishment--a published poet, author of prize-winning short stories and a controversial account of the Manson Family murders (The Family, 1971)--yet this hodge-podge shows little evidence of such craft. Instead it functions more like an annotated diary, with entries by topic or date rarely longer than a couple of paragraphs, padded with illustrations that function more as historical artifacts than art. Sanders had his fingers in many of lower Manhattan's counter-cultural pies: He published a mimeographed arts journal with an obscene name, ran an alternative bookstore, helped to found the notorious Yippie anti-party and "levitate" the Pentagon and proselytized for legalized marijuana and mass fornication in the streets. But he remains best known for fronting the Fugs, a notorious rock band of politically minded poets who landed a major-label contract and (amazingly enough) earned Sanders the cover of Life magazine and spots on national TV. The most extended and hilariously engaging part of the book is a transcript from William F. Buckley's Firing Line, with Sanders joining the conservative host, a clueless academic, and Jack Kerouac, who had become an alcoholic reactionary, in a discussion that Buckley introduced with, "Our topic tonight is the Hippies, the understanding of which we must, I guess, acquire or die painfully." The entire program was a joke that only Sanders and occasionally Kerouac seemed to get. The matter-of-fact tone through much of the narrative makes it difficult to distinguish satire from delusion. Of the Fugs, he writes, "Some of the songs on our second album are not what is currently known as PC, or politically correct, and we might not now write them in quite the same way, but they were true to the testosterone-crazed era in which they were created." One might say the same about the book, except that it was written now, about then. A collection of solid archival material for a better book.
Ben Ratliff
As a poet Mr. Sanders operates on joy, velocity, humor and catharsis, forcibly mushing bodies of knowledge together…As a prose writer he's pretty much the same, with extra mugging and contextualizing. To some extent this is an old-school show-business gossip memoir that doesn't want to waste your time, even as it discusses Egyptian glyphs and the C.I.A.…[a] funny, instructive, nourishing book.
—The New York Times

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780306818882
Publisher:
Da Capo Press
Publication date:
12/13/2011
Pages:
448
Sales rank:
1,384,308
Product dimensions:
9.46(w) x 6.52(h) x 1.42(d)

Meet the Author

Ed Sanders co-founded the Fugs, opened the Peace Eye Bookstore, and appeared on the cover of Life magazine. He is the author of The Family and lives in Woodstock, New York.

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Fug You: An Informal History of the Peace Eye Bookstore, the Fuck You Press, the Fugs, and Counterculture in the Lower East Side 2.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Orgasm
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Surprisingly dry and dull. There was the one sentence about a naked guy throwing cats at Tiny Tim, but otherwise surprisingly dry and dull. I quit about page 30.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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