Fugazi

Fugazi

4.0 3
by Marillion
     
 

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Product Details

Release Date:
10/27/1998
Label:
Caroline
UPC:
0724349336926
catalogNumber:
93369
Rank:
72246

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Marillion   Primary Artist
Fish   Vocals
Chris Karan   Percussion
Mark Kelly   Keyboards
Ian Mosley   Percussion,Drums
Linda Pyke   Vocals,Background Vocals
Steve Rothery   Guitar
Pete Trewavas   Bass

Technical Credits

Marillion   Producer,Liner Notes
Fish   Artwork
Simon Hanhart   Producer,Engineer,Liner Notes
Christopher Hedge   Remixing
Mark Kelly   Liner Notes
Nick Tauber   Producer
Mark Wilkinson   Liner Notes,Illustrations,Cover Design,Repackaging Design
Julie Hazelwood   Artwork

Customer Reviews

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Fugazi 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Marillion worked diligently to restore progressive rock in the early eighties with debut album Script for a Jester’s Tear, and there was no reason to let up with their sophomore effort. The most marked difference between this album and their first is the percussive, driving beat led by new drummer Ian Mosley. The two songs that open the album, “Assassing” and “Punch and Judy,” just won’t let up and, not coincidentally, are the singles. Fish maintains the status quo with his lyrics by singing “darkroom unleashes imagination in pornographic images in which you will always be the star” in song “Incubus.” Also like on their first album, Marillion churn out their best song with the anthemic title cut. The song even explores the same themes as “Script for a Jester’s Tear”as Fish continues to struggle with substance abuse and failed romance. Marillion work awfully hard to match the standard they set with their debut. There are times that it shows; some songs meander a bit more in Marillion’s effort to make them “epics.” Still, this album reaches farther, and in many ways succeeds, more than most bands can ever hope. Marillion worked diligently to restore progressive rock in the early eighties with debut album Script for a Jester’s Tear, and there was no reason to let up with their sophomore effort. The most marked difference between this album and their first is the percussive, driving beat led by new drummer Ian Mosley. The two songs that open the album, “Assassing” and “Punch and Judy,” just won’t let up and, not coincidentally, are the singles. Fish maintains the status quo with his lyrics by singing “darkroom unleashes imagination in pornographic images in which you will always be the star” in song “Incubus.” Also like on their first album, Marillion churn out their best song with the anthemic title cut. The song even explores the same themes as “Script for a Jester’s Tear”as Fish continues to struggle with substance abuse and failed romance. Marillion work awfully hard to match the standard they set with their debut. There are times that it shows; some songs meander a bit more in Marillion’s effort to make them “epics.” Still, this album reaches farther, and in many ways succeeds, more than most bands can ever hope.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Marillion worked diligently to restore progressive rock in the early eighties with debut album Script for a Jester’s Tear, and there was no reason to let up with their sophomore effort. The most marked difference between this album and their first is the percussive, driving beat led by new drummer Ian Mosley. The two songs that open the album, “Assassing” and “Punch and Judy,” just won’t let up and, not coincidentally, are the singles. Fish maintains the status quo with his lyrics by singing “darkroom unleashes imagination in pornographic images in which you will always be the star” in song “Incubus.” Also like on their first album, Marillion churn out their best song with the anthemic title cut. The song even explores the same themes as “Script for a Jester’s Tear”as Fish continues to struggle with substance abuse and failed romance. Marillion work awfully hard to match the standard they set with their debut. There are times that it shows; some songs meander a bit more in Marillion’s effort to make them “epics.” Still, this album reaches farther, and in many ways succeeds, more than most bands can ever hope.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago