Full Moon Barnyard Dance

Full Moon Barnyard Dance

by Carole Lexa Schaefer, Christine Davenier
     
 
Come billy-bob the bebop and slink-slank a samba! An infectiously rhythmic read-aloud pairs up with charming illustrations, inviting us to step lively - and enjoy our differences.

"What a moo-oon," crooned the cow beside the barn.
"Maa-agnificent night," bleated a goat in the grass.

It’s the night of the full moon, and the

Overview

Come billy-bob the bebop and slink-slank a samba! An infectiously rhythmic read-aloud pairs up with charming illustrations, inviting us to step lively - and enjoy our differences.

"What a moo-oon," crooned the cow beside the barn.
"Maa-agnificent night," bleated a goat in the grass.

It’s the night of the full moon, and the barnyard animals just can’t settle down. Pig declares it’s a fine night for a snufflin’ big dance, and two by two the animals sashay down to the pond to jig and fandango under the round moon. But when the bumptious clouds blow across, and the revelers dance on in the dark, a mix-up ensues - a tangle! Will the unexpected muddle turn out to be unexpectedly . . . wonderful?

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publishers Weekly
The combination of moonglow, a cricket's catchy "zweet-zweet-zweet" and a frog's basso backbeat ("thrum, thrum, thrum") proves too irresistible for a collection of farm animals, who learn a thing or two about being a partner in Schaefer's (Down in the Woods at Sleepytime) gently humorous tale. They exit the barnyard, head for the pond and start to boogie down. The animals pair up with their own kind and, with silky, translucent watercolors effused with shades of nocturnal blue, Davenier (Mabel Dancing; the Iris and Walter books) finds grace in every dance move. Two pigs kick up their plump heels with a spontaneous glee, while a smooth-looking rooster and his hen partner bring off a "fancy fandango" with continental aplomb, dipping dramatically. But this artistry can't always cover up the book's missteps. The lively spot illustrations and quick-stepping theme cry out for a distinctively rhythmic text, but the beat falters, despite some nimble alliteration and wordplay ("Goats together billy-bobbed the bebop.../ And the catsthey slink-slanked the samba"). When a cloud passes over the moon, the sudden darkness causes a momentary mix-up (with an unintentional swapping of partners); wise old frog sees it as a teachable moment"Do some new partner dancing, by the light of moon"that the animals embrace. Davenier's supple illustrations carry this tale's message of tolerance. Ages 3-6. (Sept.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
One moonlit night the barnyard animals could not get to sleep. They heard the crickets' tunes and the deep music of the frog and so the animals headed, two by two, to the pond for a dance. The cow and bull danced and dipped, the goats "billy-bobbed the bebop" and the pigs did a jig. The hens and roosters flapped and twirled while the cats slink-slanked to the beat of a samba. A cloud blew in and obscured the moon, but the crickets and frog continued their music so the animals continued to dance, but now they could not see their partners. In a merry mix-up they prance and two-step with one another. The bull wonders why the cow says "meow" instead of "moo" and the rooster thinks his hen's beak feels like a pig's snout while the hog seems to be dancing like a kid. Then another gust of wind blows the cloud away and once again the animals are bathed in moonlight. They are alarmed to realize that they have switched partners, but the frog convinces them to continue to dance and have fun until it's time to return to the barnyard and settle down to sleep. 2003, Candlewick Press, Ages 4 to 7.
— Carolyn Mott Ford
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
PreS-K-Frog and the crickets are singing, the moon is full, and the barnyard animals can't sleep. Deciding that a dance down by the pond would be enjoyable, they line up two by two-a rather festive Noah's Ark-like procession-by their own kind. The creatures fandango and be-bop and jig to their hearts' content. Clouds cover the moon and it becomes difficult for the animals to see their dancing partners, but the partying continues. Once the sky clears and the night is bright again, the critters are dismayed to find they're swinging and swaying with different companions. Frog suggests that the dancing continue with the new partners, and it does. The walk back to the barnyard at the close of the evening reveals a much-different procession, one in which the species are intermingled and fast becoming friends. Double-page, soft, flowing ink-and-watercolor paintings deftly illustrate the farm critters and their night's festivities, and the text has a rhythm all its own. An entertaining tale with a gentle moral: mixing things up a bit can add to the fun.-Maryann H. Owen, Racine Public Library, WI Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Free-spirited watercolor-and-ink illustrations show a barnyard full of animals going down to the pond at night for a rousing dance. Delightful facial expressions (glee, eagerness, joy) and loose, breezy movement--especially dancing--make the animals irresistible, while unsaturated colors create appropriate nighttime ambience. At first, in full moonlight, each animal dances with one of its own kind; but when clouds cover the moon, unintentional swapping occurs, leaving a cat dancing unknowingly with a bull, a hog with a goat, etc. Moonlight soon reappears, and everyone blanches--but only briefly. Dancing (with the new partners) soon begins again. On their way home to the barnyard at last, all admit that the change in partners wasn�t so bad. Visually charming, though a bit weighed down by the blatant message. (Picture book. 2-5)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780763618780
Publisher:
Candlewick Press
Publication date:
08/15/2003
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.25(w) x 10.25(h) x 0.39(d)
Age Range:
3 - 6 Years

Meet the Author

Carole Lexa Schaefer is the author of many acclaimed picture books for children, including the award-winning DOWN IN THE WOODS AT SLEEPYTIME, illustrated by Vanessa Cabban, and ONE WHEEL WOBBLES, illustrated by Pierr Morgan. Carole Lexa Schaefer has a master’s degree in early childhood education from the University of Washington. She founded and is director of a preschool in Seattle.

Christine Davenier has illustrated or contributed to several books for children, including MABEL DANCING by Amy Hest and IN EVERY TINY GRAIN OF SAND: A CHILD'S BOOK OF PRAY'ERS AND PRAISE, edited by Reeve Lindbergh. Christine Davenier lives in Paris.

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