Functional Roles Of Midbrain Dopamine Neurons In Associative Learning.

Overview

These experiments examine the functional properties of midbrain dopamine neurons during conditioned learning tasks designed to test their responses to sensory events. Dopamine neurons are predominately located within two regions of the midbrain, the substantia nigra pars compacta and the ventral tegmental area. This study aims to examine the function of dopamine neurons located in the substantia nigra pars compacta, the region most densely packed with dopamine neurons and known to receive short-latency visual ...
See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (2) from $71.95   
  • New (2) from $71.95   
Sending request ...

More About This Book

Overview

These experiments examine the functional properties of midbrain dopamine neurons during conditioned learning tasks designed to test their responses to sensory events. Dopamine neurons are predominately located within two regions of the midbrain, the substantia nigra pars compacta and the ventral tegmental area. This study aims to examine the function of dopamine neurons located in the substantia nigra pars compacta, the region most densely packed with dopamine neurons and known to receive short-latency visual information from the superior colliculus. Dopamine signaling is thought to play a critical role in reward-related learning, and the predominant hypothesis proposes that dopamine neurons signal the expected reward values of sensory stimuli in the form of a short-latency phasic burst. Thus, the reward prediction hypothesis assumes that information relevant to determining stimulus identity informs dopamine neuron firing. Recently, this critical assumption has been questioned and given rise to an alternative hypothetical framework proposing that dopamine activity represents a more generic signal of stimulus salience. Proponents of this competing hypothesis note that the requisite feature-based discrimination would not be possible in a period short enough to inform the dopamine response. Instead, the "saliency hypothesis" proposes that short-latency dopamine activity reflects the relative salience of stimuli (independent of their reward value) and that this signal likely derives from the superior colliculus (SC), a subcortical structure lacking the capacity for fine feature discrimination but specializes in detecting and locating salient sensory events. Support for this latter view comes from recent anatomical evidence for a projection from the SC to substantia nigra pars compacta and physiological findings showing that SC activity can drive phasic dopamine activity. This dissertation provides a critical test of these competing hypotheses through in vivo recording from dopamine neurons in the context of behavioral tasks capable of dissociating activity relating to stimulus salience from that which predicts reward value. Results from these studies reveal a biphasic neural response and suggest that dopamine neurons both encode the occurrence of salient events and predict reward at distinct temporal latencies.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781243772855
  • Publisher: BiblioLabsII
  • Publication date: 9/9/2011
  • Pages: 110
  • Product dimensions: 7.44 (w) x 9.69 (h) x 0.23 (d)

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)