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Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysic of Morals
     

Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysic of Morals

3.8 4
by Immanual Kant, Thomas Kingsmill Abbott (Translator), Thomas K. Abbott (Translator), T. K. Abbott (Translator)
 

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The nature and theoretical underpinnings of ethics have been an intellectual driving force animating the pursuits of great scholars. In the Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysics of Morals (1785) Immanuel Kant, one of the most powerful philosophical minds of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, inquires into the true nature of morality. In rejecting

Overview

The nature and theoretical underpinnings of ethics have been an intellectual driving force animating the pursuits of great scholars. In the Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysics of Morals (1785) Immanuel Kant, one of the most powerful philosophical minds of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, inquires into the true nature of morality. In rejecting the results or consequences of action as the foundation of moral judgments, he denies that good or bad effects have any relevance in the moral evaluation of human behavior. Instead, we must rely upon the Good Will for guidance. What is this Will upon which so much emphasis is placed, and how does it act as the foundation for behavior that can be assessed as truly moral? In this groundbreaking work, Immanuel Kant outlines an ethical perspective that has been a vital force in the Western world.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780879753771
Publisher:
Prometheus Books
Publication date:
02/01/1987
Series:
Great Books in Philosophy
Pages:
97
Sales rank:
505,558
Product dimensions:
5.80(w) x 8.80(h) x 0.70(d)
Lexile:
1620L (what's this?)

Meet the Author

Immanuel Kant (22 April 1724 - 12 February 1804) was a German philosopher who is considered the central figure of modern philosophy.Kant argued that fundamental concepts of the human mind structure human experience, that reason is the source of morality, that aesthetics arises from a faculty of disinterested judgment, that space and time are forms of our sensibility, and that the world as it is "in-itself" is unknowable. Kant took himself to have effected a Copernican revolution in philosophy, akin to Copernicus' reversal of the age-old belief that the sun revolved around the earth. His beliefs continue to have a major influence on contemporary philosophy, especially the fields of metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, political theory, and aesthetics.

Kant in his critical phase sought to 'reverse' the orientation of pre-critical philosophy by showing how the traditional problems of metaphysics can be overcome by supposing that the agreement between reality and the concepts we use to conceive it arises not because our mental concepts have come to passively mirror reality, but because reality must conform to the human mind's active concepts to be conceivable and at all possible for us to experience. Kant thus regarded the basic categories of the human mind as the transcendental "condition of possibility" for any experience.

Politically, Kant was one of the earliest exponents of the idea that perpetual peace could be secured through universal democracy and international cooperation. He believed that this eventually will be the outcome of universal history, although it is not rationally planned.

Kant argued that our experiences are structured by necessary features of our minds. In his view, the mind shapes and structures experience so that, on an abstract level, all human experience shares certain essential structural features. Among other things, Kant believed that the concepts of space and time are integral to all human experience, as are our concepts of cause and effect. One important consequence of this view is that our experience of things is always of the phenomenal world as conveyed by our senses: we do not have direct access to things in themselves, the so-called noumenal world.

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Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysic Of Morals 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Tunguz More than 1 year ago
Kant is not considered as one of the more accessible philosophers, and most of his monumental works are too long and beyond reach of an average reader. This short book is still fairly advanced and conceptually sophisticated, but fortunately due to its length it does not go much too deep in philosophical concepts. The book deals on several occasions with the central concept in Kant's moral philosophy, and that is the concept of categorical imperative. This imperative can be summed up in Kant's famous dictum: "Act only according to that maxim whereby you can at the same time will that it should become a universal law." Several other famous Kant concepts - like practical reason, pure reason, treating humans like ends and not as means in moral considerations, etc. - are dealt with throughout the book. You might need to read the book several times before you get a better understanding of what is being discussed, but again, since it is so short, this can be easily done. The language of the translation sounds a bit archaic to the modern ear, but this does not obscure the meaning at all. Overall, reading this book would be a worthwhile endeavor and as good of a starting point to start reading Kant as they come.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I wish I was able to read the book, but, unfortunately, some of the words were covered by large streaks of black ink and markings. Will definitely be returning, but might buy the full-length book, instead. I am still rather more interested in understanding his study.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago