Fundamentals of Telecommunications / Edition 1

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Overview

"Fundamentals of Telecommunications, Second Edition discusses innovative advances needed to understand the ever-growing telecommunications industry: general concepts in telecommunications, including what connectivity is and what nodes do; voice networks embodied by the public switched telecommunications network (PSTN); digital transmission and networks; data communications and enterprise networks; and switching and signaling, transmission transport, cable television, cellular/PCS, and asynchronous transfer mode (ATM)." With updated review exercises and references provided at the end of each chapter, this is an excellent resource for students and professionals who need to understand the tremendous impact and potential of telecommunications.

"...provides an introductory overview of all branches of telecommunications, including telephony, data communication, enterprise networks, television transmission, wireless systems, & cellular/personal communication services."

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
A text for an entry-level course for high-school graduates who understand algebra, logarithms, and basic electrical principles such as Ohm's law. Appends even these however, for any necessary review. Explains such aspects of the technology as bandwidth, data transfer protocol, PSTN, ISDN, PCS, and ATM. Considers all areas of telecommunications systems, including telephony, data communications, enterprise networks, television transmission, wireless systems, and cellular/personal communication services. Defines all terms according to the industry's standard references. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
From the Publisher
"…presents a very comprehensive treatment on the basic concepts of telecommunication without advanced mathematics." (IEEE Circuits & Devices Magazine, November/December 2006)

"...the concepts learned from this book will be a strong foundation for advanced studies in telecommunications and business data communication." (Computing Reviews.com, January 13, 2006)

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Product Details

Meet the Author

Roger L. Freeman is founder and principal of Roger Freeman Associates, independent consultants in telecommunications, specializing in system engineering in Hispanic America. In the course of more than 45 years of experience in telecommunications operations, maintenance, and engineering, he has served as principal engineer for advanced system planning at Raytheon Company, technical manager of ITT Marine, Europe, and regional planning expert for the International Telecommunications Union (ITU). Mr. Freeman is the author of Reference Manual for Telecommunications Engineering, Second Edition; Radio System Design for Telecommunications, Second Edition; Practical Data Communications; Telecommunication System Engineering, Third Edition and Telecommunications Transmission Handbook, Fourth Edition-all published by Wiley.

A senior life member of the IEEE, Roger Freeman has lectured at numerous professional conferences and published widely in international telecommunications journals. He gives telecommunications seminars at the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

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Table of Contents

Ch. 1 Introductory concepts 1
Ch. 2 Signals convey intelligence 19
Ch. 3 Quality of service and telecommunication impairments 41
Ch. 4 Transmission and switching : cornerstones of a network 55
Ch. 5 Transmission aspects of voice telephony 89
Ch. 6 Digital networks 107
Ch. 7 Signaling 149
Ch. 8 Local and long-distance networks 169
Ch. 9 Concepts in transmission transport 195
Ch. 10 Data communications 251
Ch. 11 Enterprise networks I : local area networks 291
Ch. 12 Enterprise networks II : wide area networks 315
Ch. 13 Metropolitan area networks 341
Ch. 14 CCITT signaling system no. 7 361
Ch. 15 Voice-over packets in a packet network 387
Ch. 16 Television transmission 403
Ch. 17 Community antenna television (cable television) 431
Ch. 18 Cellular and PCS radio systems 457
Ch. 19 Advanced broadband digital transport formats 489
Ch. 20 Asynchronous transfer mode 511
Ch. 21 Network management 539
App. A Review of fundamentals of electricity with telecommunication applications 575
App. B A review of mathematics for telecommunication applications 603
App. C Learning decibels and their applications 615
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Preface

This book is an entry-level text on the technology of telecommunications. It has been crafted with the newcomer in mind. The eighteen chapters of text have been prepared for high-school graduates who understand algebra, logarithms, and basic electrical principles such as Ohm's law. However, many users require support in these areas so Appendices A and B review the essentials of electricity and mathematics through logarithms. This material was placed in the appendices so as not to distract from the main theme: the technology of telecommunication systems. Another topic that many in the industry find difficult is the use of decibels and derived units. Appendix C provides the reader with a basic understanding of decibels and their applications. The only mathematics necessary is an understanding of the powers of ten.

To meet my stated objective, whereby this text acts as a tutor for those with no experience in telecommunications, every term and concept is carefully explained. Nearly all terminology can be traced to the latest edition of the IEEE dictionary and/or to the several ITU (International Telecommunication Union) glossaries. Other tools I use are analogies and real-life experiences.

We hear the expression "going back to basics." This book addresses the basics and it is written in such a way that it brings along the novice. The structure of the book is purposeful; later chapters build on earlier material. The book begins with some general concepts in telecommunications: What is connectivity, What do nodes do? From there we move on to the voice network embodied in the public switched telecommunications network (PSTN), digital transmission and networks, an introduction to data communications, followed by enterprise networks. It continues with switching and signaling, the transmission transport, cable television, cellular/PCS, ATM, and network management. CCITT Signaling System No. 7 is a data network used exclusively for signaling. It was located after our generic discussion of data and enterprise networks. The novice would be lost in the explanation of System 7 without a basic understanding of data communications.

I have borrowed heavily from my many enriching years of giving seminars, both at Northeastern University and at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The advantage of the classroom is that the instructor can stop to reiterate or explain a sticky point. Not so with a book. As a result, I have made every effort to spot those difficult issues, and then give clear explanations. Brevity has been a challenge for me. Telecommunications is developing explosively. My goal has been to hit the high points and leave the details to my other texts.

A major source of reference material has been the International Telecommunication Union (ITU). The ITU had a major reorganization on January 1, 1993. Its two principal subsidiary organizations, CCITT and CCIR, changed their names to ITU Telecommunication Standardization Sector and the ITU Radio Communications Sector, respectively. Reference publications issued prior to January 1993 carry the older title: CCITT and CCIR. Standards issued after that date carry ITU-T for Telecommunication Sector publications and ITU-R for the Radio Communications Sector documents.

Acknowledgments

Some authors are fortunate to have a cadre of friends who pitch in to help and advise during the preparation of a book. I am one of these privileged people. These friends have stood by me since the publication of my first technical text. In this group are John Lawlor, principal, John Lawlor and Associates of Sharon, MA; Dr. Ron Brown, independent consultant, Melrose, MA; Bill Ostaski, an expert on Internet matters who is based in Beverly Farms, MA; Marshall Cross. president, Megawave Corp., Boylston, MA; and Jerry Brilliant, independent consultant based in Fairfax, VA.

I am grateful to my friends at Motorola in Chandler, AZ, where I learned about mentoring young engineers. In that large group, four names immediately come to mind: Dr. Ernie Woodward, Doug White, Dr. Ali Elahi, and Ken Peterson-all of the Celestri program.

Then there is Milt Crane, an independent consultant in Phoenix, AZ, who is active in local IEEE affairs. Dan Danbeck, program director with Engineering Professional Development, University of Wisconsin-Madison, who provided constructive comments on the book's outline. Ted Myers, of Ameritech Cellular, made helpful suggestions on content. John Bellamy, independent consultant and Prof. John Proakis, series editor and well-known author in his own right, reviewed the outline and gave constructive comments to shorten the book to some reasonable length.

I shall always be indebted to Dr. Don Schilling, professor emeritus, City College of New York and great proponent of CDMA in the PCS and cellular environment. Also, my son, Bob Freeman, major accounts manager for Hispanic America, Axis Communications, for suggestions on book promotion. Bob broke into this business about five years ago. Also, my thanks to Dr. Ted Woo of SCTE for help on CATV; to Fran Drake, program director, University of Wisconsin-Madison, who gave me this book idea in the first place; and Dr. Bob Egri, principal investigator at MaCom Lowell (MA) for suggestions on the radio frequency side.

Roger L. Freeman
Scottsdale, Arizona
November, 1998

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 24, 2002

    Mired in the bits and dBs.

    In the second chapter the author states that in the old days of telephony transmission and switching were sperate disciplines with strong demarcation between them. This book seems to preserve the distinction. The emphasis is on transmission technologies. Switching and the protocol issues surrounding signaling, network management, configuration and service provisioning are treated only lightly if at all. For example the messages sent in Signaling System 7 (SS7) are detailed but there is no example of the protocols and how these messages are used to set up calls. The material on data communications protocols is nearly useless once one rises above the bits on the wire. Data link protocols are only presented in outline and no useful information is provided about network layer routing or transport protocols. Now having said all of that I must add that it is an excellent introduction to telephony transmission. If you want to know how to build line of sight microwave links or how to manage noise in CATV systems or the many possible imparements of mobile telephone radio signals it's all here very clear and understandable. It is difficult to determine the intended audience. My guess is that this might be a good introduction for people who intend to work as linemen for the phone company. Others are likely to be dissapointed. I was hoping for a more comprehensive introduction especially considering the premium price.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 19, 1999

    THE REQUISTE INTRODUCTION TO TELECOMMUNICATIONS

    'Fundamental of Telecommunications' introduces the reader how telecommunication systems work. It has been crafted with the newcomer in mind. The eighteen chapters of text have been prepared for high-school graduates who understand algebra, logarithms and basic electrical principles such as Ohm's law. However, many user require support in these areas so Appendices A and B review the essentials of electricity and mathematics through logarithms. The material was placed in the appendices so as not to distract from the main theme: the technology of telecommunications systems. To meet my stated objective, whereby the text acts as a tutor for those with no experience in telecommunications, every term and concept are carefully explained. Nearly all terminology can be traced to the latest edition of the IEEE dictionary. Other tools I use are analogies and real-life experiences. We hear the expression 'going back to basics.' The book addresses the basics and is written in such a way that brings along the novice. The structure of the book is purposeful; later chapters build on earlier material. The book begins with some general concepts in telecommunications: What is connectivity, What do nodes do? From there we move on to the voice network embodied in the public switched telecommunications network (PSTN), digital transmission and networks, an introduction to data communications, followed by enterprise networks. It continues with switching and signaling. These topics were located after our generic discussion of data networks. The novice would be lost in the explanation of Signaling System No. 7 without a basic understanding of data communications. I have borrowed heavily from my many enriching years giving seminars, both at Northeastern University and at the University of Wisconsin - Madison. The advantage of the classroom is that the instructor can stop to reiterate or explain a sticky point. No so with a book. As a result I have made every effort to spot those difficult issues, and then give clear explanations. Brevity has been a challenge to me. Telecommunications is developing explosively. My goal has been to hit the high points and leave details to my other texts.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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