Fungal Disease in Britain and the United States 1850-2000: Mycoses and Modernity [NOOK Book]

Overview

This book is open access under a CC BY license.
The grand narrative of twentieth-century medicine is the conquering of acute infectious diseases and the rise in chronic, degenerative diseases. The history of fungal infections does not fit this picture; indeed, it runs against it - this book charts the path of fungal infections from the mid nineteenth century to the dawn of the twenty-first century, both in Britain and the United States. It examines how fungal infections became ...
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Fungal Disease in Britain and the United States 1850-2000: Mycoses and Modernity

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Overview

This book is open access under a CC BY license.
The grand narrative of twentieth-century medicine is the conquering of acute infectious diseases and the rise in chronic, degenerative diseases. The history of fungal infections does not fit this picture; indeed, it runs against it - this book charts the path of fungal infections from the mid nineteenth century to the dawn of the twenty-first century, both in Britain and the United States. It examines how fungal infections became more prevalent and serious over the century, a rise that was linked to the increased incidence of chronic diseases and to social, technological and medical 'progress'. In 1900, conditions such as ringworm, athlete's foot and thrush were minor, external and mostly chronic conditions – irritating, but mostly self-limiting. In the subsequent decades, these infections remained very common, but were better controlled by antifungal drugs. However, by the year 2000 doctors were faced by a growing number of serious and life-threatening fungal infections, such as invasive aspergillosis and systemic candidiasis. These infections principally affect patients who have benefited from medical advances, such as antibiotic treatment and transplantation, and those with immuno-compromised conditions.
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Product Details

Meet the Author

Aya Homei is a Wellcome Trust Fellow at the School of Arts, Languages and Cultures, University of Manchester, UK. She is currently working on a new book, Family Planning, Health Promotion and Global Medicine, 1945-1995: The Activities of Japanese Health Campaigners around the World (forthcoming).

Michael Worboys is Director of the Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine, UK. He works on the history of infectious diseases and has recently published, with Neil Pemberton, Rabies in Britain: Dogs, Disease and Culture, 1830-2000 (Palgrave 2012).
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Table of Contents

This book is open access under a CC BY license.

 

Acknowledgements
Introduction
1. Ringworm: A Disease of Schools and Schooling
2. Athlete's Foot: A Disease of Fitness and Hygiene
3. Candida: A Disease of Antibiotics
4. Endemic Mycoses, Mycotoxins and Allergies: Diseases of Social Change
5. Aspergillosis: A Disease of Medical Progress
Conclusion 
 


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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 25, 2013

    Monkey

    Is not pokemon
    Its a earthing
    Unlike you

    0 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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