The Furies [NOOK Book]

Overview


An unidentified object crashes from the sky into an Arizona canyon, releasing anthrax spores and leaving innocent victims in its wake. Investigators are shocked by what they find in the rubble: a swastika. They call upon former spy and World War II–era weapons expert Lewis Sharp for help. Could this be a biochemical weapon designed by the Nazis half a century ago—or is it an elaborate hoax? Sharp is convinced that it’s the real McCoy and he warns that two more killing machines ...

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The Furies

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Overview


An unidentified object crashes from the sky into an Arizona canyon, releasing anthrax spores and leaving innocent victims in its wake. Investigators are shocked by what they find in the rubble: a swastika. They call upon former spy and World War II–era weapons expert Lewis Sharp for help. Could this be a biochemical weapon designed by the Nazis half a century ago—or is it an elaborate hoax? Sharp is convinced that it’s the real McCoy and he warns that two more killing machines are still out there, primed and ready to strike…

The attacker has left a cryptic note hinting at an another attack. Now, it’s up to Sharp to piece together a sixty-year-old mystery—one that spans from a convent in Hitler’s Germany to Hollywood, the Executive Branch to shadowy third-world governments. Sharp and his colleagues have just five days left to stop the weapon from unleashing mass destruction—and leading the world to the brink of a whole new kind of war…


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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“Fans of Dan Brown take note.”—Jack DuBrul

“Napier deftly mix[es] history, science, and fiction.”—Publishers Weekly

“The most exciting book I have ever read.” —Arthur C. Clarke on Nemesis

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781429958493
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
  • Publication date: 9/29/2009
  • Sold by: Macmillan
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 512
  • Sales rank: 492,654
  • File size: 478 KB

Meet the Author


Bill Napier was born in Perth, Scotland in 1940. He studied astronomy at Glasgow University and has spent most of his career as an astronomer at observatories in Scotland, Italy and Northern Ireland. He now lives in Southern Ireland with his wife and divides his time between writing novels and carrying out research with colleagues in the UK and California. He is an honorary professor in the Centre for Astrobiology at Cardiff University and has an asteroid -- 7096 Napier -- named after him (it pursues a chaotic, eccentric orbit but is not yet a collision hazard). He likes to cook but faces stiff competition from wife and children.
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Read an Excerpt


UFO:

FOSSIL CREEK, ARIZONA, 0430

Under a brilliant Milky Way, the figures are puny. Bent double, they might be crabs scuttling over rocks, and the whump-whump filling the air around them the wing beats of some giant mythical bird. But as the big Chinook soars up and away, its navigation lights off, the creek returns to a silence broken only by the gurgling river.

Dressed like astronauts, they work swiftly, using subdued flashlights to set up trestle tables, microscopes, and flasks. The heavy gloves turn this into a clumsy operation. Only then do they begin to explore the creek, and it is fifteen minutes before they find Joe Wupatki at the edge of the river. His cell phone is clutched tightly in his hand. His face is black and blistered, his eyes are staring, and his facial muscles are still contorted by his last efforts to breathe.

It was never established just what Joe Wupatki was doing in Fossil Creek at two o’clock in the morning, and it had been hard to take his flying saucer call seriously. Nevertheless he was a respected elder of the Tonto Apache reservation, and if Old Joe said he’d seen a UFO crashing in the creek, then so be it. This was the logic that sent the first patrol car out from Payson.

Within half an hour the solitary patrolman reported that he had reached Strawberry and was about to turn west, onto the unsafe, unpaved road that plunges steeply down the Mogollon Rim to Fossil Creek. This was his last message. When he failed to respond to calls, a second patrolman was sent out. When he, too, fell silent, three more cars were dispatched from Flagstaff, a good hour to the north. These were high-clearance, four-wheel-drive vehicles—the report had come from remote, rugged hill country—and the officers, by now sensing trouble, took rifles.

Arriving at the Strawberry turnoff, one of these officers managed to croak a few garbled, choking words, but the telephonist could make no sense of them, and from then on the vehicle’s radio sent only the occasional indistinct noise, like tapping or bumping, and what might have been groaning. These sounds, too, eventually stopped.

As the mysterious silence continued the dispatcher, by now on her own in the little police station, became increasingly agitated. Her nerve finally gave out and just after four o’clock she roused her boss, who called Phoenix Air Support, who sent out a Eurocopter. It drifted up and down the Mogollon Rim road, saw nothing until, up the Rim, it scanned a little parking lot next to an all-night diner just outside Strawberry. The Night Sun illuminated a dozen corpses scattered over the tarmac, some in police uniform. At least they were presumed to be corpses since they weren’t moving and were lying in various unnatural positions. The police vehicles, three of them, still had headlights on. One had smashed into the side of the diner.

A chain of dead-of-night phone calls followed, and as the bowl of night faded from black to dark blue to deep scarlet, the sun rose to reveal men and women, protective suits now pink in the Arizona dawn, swarming over the base of the pine-covered canyon. Their findings triggered a series of events that would, inside a week, lead to the brink of war.

Excerpted from The Furies by Bill Napier.
Copyright 2009 by Bill Napier.
Published in October 2009 by St. Martin's Press.
All rights reserved. This work is protected under copyright laws and reproduction is strictly prohibited. Permission to reproduce the material in any manner or medium must be secured from the Publisher.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 6 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 14, 2009

    GOOD STUFF!!!

    This is a good book. Mixes history, a little sci-fi and action all altogether in one package. Great story line. I have read others of his. All good.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 3, 2009

    Excellent book!

    Bill Napier has produced a brilliant, thoughtful, absorbing, gripping and serious book. A must read. Deals with dark stuff in an original and frankly terrifying manner.

    He doesn't actually mention Moslems in the Furies, the only Germans hated by Bill Napier are Nazis (can't fault that myself). In his book Jewish people under the Nazis are the victims, as borne out by awful factual history of Germany in the 1930s and 1940s. Napier doesn't hate Americans or Catholics. There are some really bad hateful people in this book, mostly Nazis, but it's vital to distinguish between the literary characters and the author.

    I think to conflate author with characters is completely wrong. Stephen King writes about a bad dog in Cujo and the dog gets some bad treatment - doesn't mean he hates dogs. In the Hannibal Cannibal books the good Doctor is, well, hardly a good Doctor - doesn't mean the author hates Doctors - they are literary devices. I could go on. You get the point I'm sure.

    Anyway Napier is exploring some ideas in a way that jolts you out of torpor. No bad thing.

    A very good book indeed, very thought provoking.

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  • Posted November 27, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    The Furies WAIST OF TIME

    I was very disappointed in this book. Bill Napier did a very good job showing his contempt for the Catholic Church Americans and Germans. while at the same time painting Muslims as victims. I had to stop reading about half way through. This is the worst piece of fiction I have read in over two years.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 11, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 9, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews

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