Fuszard's Innovative Teaching Strategies in Nursing / Edition 3

Fuszard's Innovative Teaching Strategies in Nursing / Edition 3

by Arle Lowenstein, Martha J. Bradshaw, Martha Bradshaw
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0763715514

ISBN-13: 9780763715519

Pub. Date: 12/31/2003

Publisher: Jones & Bartlett Learning, LLC

Fuszard's Innovative Teaching Strategies in Nursing, Third Edition, gives nurse educators, as well as educators in other health professions, the in-depth and interdisciplinary information they need to prepare for today's changing teaching-learning environment.

This new edition includes a wide variety of field-tested teaching strategies for multiple

Overview

Fuszard's Innovative Teaching Strategies in Nursing, Third Edition, gives nurse educators, as well as educators in other health professions, the in-depth and interdisciplinary information they need to prepare for today's changing teaching-learning environment.

This new edition includes a wide variety of field-tested teaching strategies for multiple settings-clinical site, traditional classroom, and distance education. Theoretical foundations for the implementation of teaching and understanding of learners can be seen throughout this book.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780763715519
Publisher:
Jones & Bartlett Learning, LLC
Publication date:
12/31/2003
Edition description:
Older Edition
Pages:
378
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 1.00(d)

Table of Contents

Contributorsxv
Forewordxix
Acknowledgmentsxxi
Part IIntroduction1
Chapter 1Effective Learning: What Teachers Need To Know3
Theories of Learning3
Approaches to Learning5
Use of Learning Styles and Preferences: Application of Research8
Effective Teaching for Effective Learning9
Future Considerations11
Conclusion12
Example: How Do I Learn Best?12
Chapter 2Strategies for Innovation18
Examples of Innovation20
Developing Innovative Strategies21
Conclusion23
Chapter 3Critical Thinking in Nursing Education29
Introduction29
Definition of Critical Thinking29
Importance in Nursing31
The Role of Nursing Education32
Evaluation of Critical Thinking39
Conclusion40
Chapter 4Creativity43
Theoretical Rationale44
Conditions45
Types of Learners45
Using the Method45
Exercise or Self-Awareness Activity: Student's Creative Process in Smaller Group Situations: "Ode to an Orange"46
Example: The Backpack Project48
Chapter 5Humor in the Classroom: Facilitating the Learning Process54
Definition and Purpose54
Theoretical Rationale56
Conditions57
Types of Learners58
Resources58
Using the Method59
Potential Problems60
Part IITeaching in Structured Settings63
Chapter 6Lecture Is Not a Four-Letter Word!65
Introduction65
Definition and Purposes65
Theoretical Rationale66
Types of Learners68
Types of Lectures68
Using the Method70
Resources72
Potential Problems75
Evaluation80
Conclusion81
Chapter 7Problem-Based Learning83
Definition and Purpose83
Theoretical Rationale84
Conditions85
Types of Learners85
Resources86
Role of Faculty86
Application of the Problem-Based Learning Strategy87
Advantages of Problem-Based Learning97
Potential Problems98
Conclusion99
Example: Problem-Based Learning: The Use of the Exemplar Family As the Basis for Learning Health Promotion and Illness/Injury Prevention99
Chapter 8Reflective Practice107
Definition and Purposes107
Theoretical Rationale108
Conditions108
Types of Learners109
Resources109
Using the Method109
Potential Problems110
Conclusion111
Chapter 9Teaching Sensitive Subjects113
Definition and Purposes113
Theoretical Rationale114
Conditions115
Types of Learners115
Resources116
Using the Method116
Potential Problems118
Part IIISimulation and Imagination121
Chapter 10Role-Play123
Definition and Purposes123
Theoretical Rationale124
Conditions125
Planning and Modifying125
Types of Learners125
Resources126
Using the Method126
Potential Problems128
Example: Understanding Patient Adherence128
Chapter 11High-Fidelity Patient Simulation134
Definition and Purposes134
Theoretical Rationale136
Conditions138
Types of Learners140
Resources141
Using the Method143
Potential Problems146
Conclusion147
Chapter 12Expressive Techniques: Movement As Embodied Knowing149
Definitions and Purposes149
Theoretical Rationale150
Conditions152
Types of Learners152
Resources153
Using the Method153
Potential Problems154
Example: Students in Maternal Child Nursing Rotation155
Chapter 13Debate As a Teaching Strategy159
Definition and Purposes159
Theoretical Rationale160
Conditions for Learning160
Types of Learners161
Resources161
Using the Method162
Potential Problems164
Conclusion165
Chapter 14The Tree of Impact166
Definition and Purposes166
Theoretical Rationale167
Conditions167
Types of Learners169
Resources169
Using the Method170
Example: Plotting the Future of AIDS171
Part IVTechnology Assisted Strategies181
Chapter 15Teaching by Distance Education183
Definitions and Purposes183
Theoretical Rationale184
Conditions185
Types of Learners187
Resources187
Using the Method188
Potential Problems192
Conclusion193
Chapter 16Electronic Communication Strategies
Definition and Purposes196
Theoretical Rationale197
Conditions198
Types of Learners198
Resources198
Using the Method199
Potential Problems199
Example: Electronic Journaling200
Chapter 17Web-Based Instruction210
Definition and Purposes210
Theoretical Rationale211
Conditions212
Types of Learners213
Resources213
Using the Method216
Potential Problems223
Conclusion224
Part VRemote Faculty227
Chapter 18Co-Consultant229
Definition and Purposes229
Theoretical Rationale229
Conditions230
Types of Learners231
Resources232
Using the Method232
Potential Problems233
Example: Consultation for Nursing Service Standards234
Chapter 19Preceptorial Experience242
Definition and Purposes242
Theoretical Rationale242
Conditions243
Types of Learners243
Resources244
Using the Method244
Potential Problems245
Example: Preceptorial Experience in the Senior Year of a Baccalaureate Program246
Chapter 20Mentorship251
Definition and Purposes251
Theoretical Rationale252
Conditions253
Types of Learners253
Resources253
Using the Method253
Potential Problems255
Example: A Mentoring Relationship256
Part VIClinical Teaching261
Chapter 21Philosophical Approaches to Clinical Instruction263
Introduction263
Role of the Clinical Instructor263
Foundations for Selection of Clinical Activities264
Clinical Activities and Problem Solving266
Student Development267
Faculty Development267
Conclusion267
Chapter 22Refocusing the Nursing Skills Laboratory269
Definition and Purposes269
Theoretical Rationale269
Conditions270
Types of Learners270
Resources270
Using the Method271
Potential Problems271
Discussion272
Example: Toward Theory-Based Practice272
Assessment273
Chapter 23Teaching Patients with Low Literacy Skills278
Definition and Purposes278
Theoretical Rationale280
Conditions281
Types of Learners282
Resources283
Using the Method283
Potential Problems284
Conclusion284
Example: Teaching Reflux285
Chapter 24A Community-Based Practicum Experience290
Definition and Purposes290
Theoretical Rationale290
Conditions291
Types of Learners293
Resources293
Using the Method295
Evaluation298
Potential Problems300
Conclusion301
Chapter 25Nursing Process Mapping Replaces Nursing Care Plans303
Definition and Purposes303
Theoretical Rationale304
Conditions305
Types of Learners305
Resources307
Using the Method307
Evaluation308
Chapter 26Issues in Clinical Teaching: Cautionary Tales for Nursing Faculty314
Introduction314
Case History 1Protection of Patient Safety315
Case History 2The Student Nurse Uncovers a Scandal315
Case History 3Safeguarding of Nursing Students316
Case Histories 4 and 5Students As Police317
Case History 6The Incompetent Student319
Case History 7The Peanut Butter Scare320
Guidelines for Faculty322
Part VIIEvaluation325
Chapter 27Computer-Based Testing327
Definition and Purposes327
Theoretical Rationale328
Conditions329
Types of Learners330
Resources331
Using the Method332
Potential Problems335
Conclusion338
Chapter 28The Clinical Pathway: A Tool To Evaluate Clinical Learning340
Definition and Purpose340
Theoretical Rationale340
Conditions340
Types of Learners341
Resources341
Using the Method342
Potential Problems347
Conclusion347
Chapter 29Evaluation of Learning Outcomes349
Introduction349
Foundational Concepts350
Evaluation Model352
Types of Evaluation353
Faculty Responsibility in Evaluation353
Evaluation of Learning355
Evaluation of Teaching363
Conclusion365
Index368

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