Future Men

( 2 )

Overview

How do we build our sons to be tough but not arrogant? mannered but not soft? imaginative but not lazy? bold but not hollow? Future Men is a Christian guide to raising strong, virtuous sons, contrary to the effeminacy and sentimentalism of contemporary culture.

When Theodore Roosevelt taught Sunday school for a time, a boy showed up one Sunday with a black eye. He admitted he had been fighting and on a Sunday too. He told the future president that a bigger boy had been pinching ...

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Overview

How do we build our sons to be tough but not arrogant? mannered but not soft? imaginative but not lazy? bold but not hollow? Future Men is a Christian guide to raising strong, virtuous sons, contrary to the effeminacy and sentimentalism of contemporary culture.

When Theodore Roosevelt taught Sunday school for a time, a boy showed up one Sunday with a black eye. He admitted he had been fighting and on a Sunday too. He told the future president that a bigger boy had been pinching his sister, and so he fought him. TR told him that he had done perfectly right and gave him a dollar. The stodgy vestrymen thought this was a bit much, and so they let their exuberant Sunday school teacher go. What a loss.

Unbelief cannot look past surfaces. Unbelief squashes; faith teaches. Faith takes a boy aside and tells him that this part of what he did was good, while the other part of what he did got in the way. "And this is how to do it better next time."

As we look to Scripture for patterns of masculinity for our sons, we find them manifested perfectly in the life of the Lord Jesus Christ. He is the one who set the ultimate pattern for friendship, for courage, for faithfulness, and integrity.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781885767837
  • Publisher: Canon Press
  • Publication date: 1/1/2001
  • Pages: 200
  • Sales rank: 288,283
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.42 (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 2.5
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 26, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    The previous reviewer rightly notes the good teachings of this b

    The previous reviewer rightly notes the good teachings of this book, but then rates the author's behavior, not the book. The author may not have lived up to the standards he presents in the book, but that in no way diminishes the truths taught in his book. Think about it. None of us lives up to the teachings of the Bible, either, but that doesn't make the Bible a bad book.
    This book has excellent guidelines for training boys to become honorable, godly men, and good parenting guidelines.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 14, 2003

    One star next to a stack of chips

    On the one hand, this book teaches many important principles necessary to train boys for manhood, i.e., taking responsibility, the value of hard work, the consequences of sin, etc., and the author should be commended for this. But on the other hand, the author of this book failed to apply any of these rules when certain young men in his church opened an illegal blackjack casino and gambled away thousands of dollars. Instead of using this extraordinary circumstance to teach the boys a valuable lesson in life, the author took money from the tithe fund, paid off their gambling debts, and didn't tell any families in the church, including the boys' parents. Maybe the author can explain this disconnect between his written standards and his actual deeds, but I cannot. It strikes me as rank hypocrisy. Therefore I rate this book with a carefully guarded star placed next to a stack of chips. And I recommend that if you buy a copy, then consider buying two. You can send the extra to the author with the suggestion that he practice what he preaches.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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