Future Minds: How the Digital Age Is Changing Our Minds, Why This Matters, and What We Can Do About It

Future Minds: How the Digital Age Is Changing Our Minds, Why This Matters, and What We Can Do About It

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by Richard Watson
     
 

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Drawing on the latest research, this book looks at the ways that screen culture is shaping the future and changing the way we think. Future Minds asks: are we becoming addicted to data and how do we go about starting a digital diet, urgently? You’ll find thought-provoking and practical suggestions about reclaiming the space and time to think deeply

Overview

Drawing on the latest research, this book looks at the ways that screen culture is shaping the future and changing the way we think. Future Minds asks: are we becoming addicted to data and how do we go about starting a digital diet, urgently? You’ll find thought-provoking and practical suggestions about reclaiming the space and time to think deeply.

Editorial Reviews

Ellen Sideri
A great case for how to think, not what to think in these fast moving and complex times. Watson's message is clear - our innate imagination and human ability to think deeply about life and issues are the best assets we have to deliver us safely to the future. Full of wonderfully inspired quotations, sage predictions and abundance of source material this is a how to that is definately a must have.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781857885491
Publisher:
Quercus
Publication date:
10/07/2010
Pages:
228
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.70(d)

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Future Minds: How the Digital Age is Changing Our Minds, Why this Matters and What We Can Do About It 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
RolfDobelli More than 1 year ago
Author and scenario planning consultant Richard Watson is clearly torn. One minute, he issues warnings about the negative effects of digital technologies on the brain and human society and discusses his fears that people pay insufficient attention to the possible consequences of these effects. The next minute, Watson is positively giddy and excited by the future potential of that same technology. The possibility of controlling machines with your mind, or improving your mental function by popping a pill, sounds like life in a science fiction utopia. But every utopia carries the possibility that it might turn into a dystopia that traps the human spirit: That's Watson primary concern and the insight he offers his readers. getAbstract recommends this book to anyone interested in futurism, cyberculture, digital technology or the ethics of human society.