Future Noir: The Making of Blade Runner

Overview

The 1992 release of the "Director's Cut" only confirmed what the international film cognoscenti have know all along: Ridley Scott's Blade Runner, based on Philip K. Dick's brilliant and troubling SF novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep, still rules as the most visually dense, thematically challenging, and influential SF film ever made.

Future Noir is the story of that triumph.

The making of Blade Runner was a seven-year odyssey that would ...

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Overview

The 1992 release of the "Director's Cut" only confirmed what the international film cognoscenti have know all along: Ridley Scott's Blade Runner, based on Philip K. Dick's brilliant and troubling SF novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep, still rules as the most visually dense, thematically challenging, and influential SF film ever made.

Future Noir is the story of that triumph.

The making of Blade Runner was a seven-year odyssey that would test the stamina and the imagination of writers, producers, special effects wizards, and the most innovative art directors and set designers in the industry.

A fascinating look at the ever-shifting interface between commerce and the art that is modern Hollywood, Future Noir is the intense, intimate, anything-but-glamerous inside account of how the work of SF's most uncompromising author was transformed into a critical sensation, a commercial success, and a cult classic.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061053146
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 5/28/1996
  • Pages: 464
  • Sales rank: 560,925
  • Product dimensions: 6.12 (w) x 9.25 (h) x 1.16 (d)

Meet the Author

Paul M. Sammon's distinctive career can best be described by the film industry expression "hyphenate."

As a writer, Sammon has published numerous articles, short stories and books. His many film journalism pieces have seen print in The American Cinematographer, Cahiers du Cinema, The Los Angeles Times, Omni, Cinefex, and Cinefantastique. Sammon's fiction has appeared in Peter Straub's Ghosts (1995), and he recently edited both the 1994 "dead Elvis" anthology The King Is Dead plus the "no limits" anthologies Splatterpunks: Extreme Horror and Splatterpunks II: Over the Edge (1995).

But Paul M. Sammon does not only write about movies—he works in them as well. He first entered the industry as a publicist in the late 1970s, before moving on as a second-unit director, special effects coordinator, still photographer, electronic press kit producer, and Vice President of Special Promotions. Some of the scores of motion pictures on which Sammon has labored include RoboCop, Platoon, Blue Velvet, Conan the Barbarian, and The Silence of the Lambs.

By the late 1980s, Sammon was working in Japanese television, where he coproduced popular entertainment programs like Hello! Movies for the TV Asahi network. By the 1990s, Sammon had served as Computer Graphics Supervisor for RoboCop 2; he recently was Digital and Optical Effects Supervisor for 1995's XTRO: Watch the Skies.

Despite this background, however, Sammon still likes nothing better than sitting down with a good movie. And Blade Runner remains one of his favorite films.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction: One Man's Obsession
I The Film 1
II The Book 8
III Development 21
IV The Director and the Deal 35
V Script Wars 51
VI Designing Blade Runner 71
VII The Cast and Crew 82
VIII The Shoot 96
IX "Blood Runner": Friction on the Set 202
X The Special Effects 222
XI Postproduction and the Music 267
XII Sneaks and Panic 278
XIII Voice-Overs, San Diego, and a New Happy Ending 291
XIV The Theatrical Release 309
XV The Cult 321
XVI The Workprint 330
XVII The Director's Cut 349
XVIII Final Shots 372
App. A Interview with Ridley Scott 375
App. B Different Faces of Blade Runner: How Many Versions? 394
App. C Blade Runner Blunders 409
App. D Blade Runner Online 416
App. E The Score: Blade Runner Soundtrack Catalog 419
App. F Videography: Blade Runner on Tape, Laser Disc, and Television 426
App. G A Short Blade Runner Bibliography 433
App. H Photo and Screenplay Excerpt Credits 436
App. I Film Credits 437
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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 19, 2001

    Only read if you are a BIG fan of the movie

    You will never believe what many people went through to get this movie made. This is a very instersting account which kept me reading for many hours. After reading, watch Blade Runner again. It will be a whole new expierence.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 11, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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