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The Future of Learning Institutions in a Digital Age [NOOK Book]

Overview


In this report, Cathy Davidson and David Theo Goldberg focus on the potential for shared and interactive learning made possible by the Internet. They argue that the single most important characteristic of the Internet is its capacity for world-wide community and the limitless exchange of ideas. The Internet brings about a way of learning that is not new or revolutionary but is now the norm for today's graduating high school and college classes. It is for this reason that Davidson and Goldberg call on us to ...
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The Future of Learning Institutions in a Digital Age

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Overview


In this report, Cathy Davidson and David Theo Goldberg focus on the potential for shared and interactive learning made possible by the Internet. They argue that the single most important characteristic of the Internet is its capacity for world-wide community and the limitless exchange of ideas. The Internet brings about a way of learning that is not new or revolutionary but is now the norm for today's graduating high school and college classes. It is for this reason that Davidson and Goldberg call on us to examine potential new models of digital learning and rethink our virtually enabled and enhanced learning institutions.This report is available in a free digital edition on the MIT Press website at mitpress.mit.edu/9780262513593.John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Reports on Digital Media and Learning
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Product Details

Meet the Author

Cathy N. Davidson is the John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute Professor of Interdisciplinary Studies and Ruth F. Devarney Professor of English at Duke University.

David Theo Goldberg is Director of the University of California Humanities Research Institute and the University of California, Irvine.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 9 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 30, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    A reflection on the effect of new technologies on higher learning

    The "Digital Age" that we live in has been the subject of many (too many?) books, articles, essays and blogs in recent times. Everyone who has not lived in a cave in the last few years realizes that the pace of technological advancement is increasing, and many of the traditional forms of communicating, working and shopping are continuously being redefined. Despite all of this, the role and the form of higher education have hardly changed, aside from PowerPoint presentations replacing most writing-on-a-blackboard styled ones. On the other hand, it is unclear whether any of these new technologies do in fact aid the learning process. As someone who has implemented many of these trends in college classes that I had taught, I have to admit that the jury is still out on the actual impact that the new digital technologies can have on students.

    This short book raises many interesting points and it provides references to several novel learning and publishing tools that I will be happy to try out. The book itself was written using some of those tools in a very collaborative process. It provides a prescription for implementing many of these tools and techniques in academia. However, it is not clear to me what exactly would the implementation of those tools and teaching techniques accomplish. In fact, there is very little hard analysis in this book that one can find in most social-science publications. Overall, this book provides more starting points for further consideration than actionable ideas for further development of higher education. It is a worthwhile read if one doesn't expect too much.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 25, 2011

    Good

    Good

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 13, 2011

    Not recommended

    We hate DRM! When you buy an ebook you should be able to do whatever you want with it. DRM has no place here! Boycott ebooks with DRM!!!

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted April 15, 2011

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    Posted March 29, 2011

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    Posted November 16, 2011

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    Posted December 23, 2012

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    Posted April 14, 2012

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