Future of Life

Future of Life

4.8 11
by Edward O. Wilson

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One of the world’s most important scientists, Edward O. Wilson is also an abundantly talented writer who has twice won the Pulitzer Prize. In this, his most personal and timely book to date, he assesses the precarious state of our environment, examining the mass extinctions occurring in our time and the natural treasures we are about to lose forever. Yet, rather…  See more details below


One of the world’s most important scientists, Edward O. Wilson is also an abundantly talented writer who has twice won the Pulitzer Prize. In this, his most personal and timely book to date, he assesses the precarious state of our environment, examining the mass extinctions occurring in our time and the natural treasures we are about to lose forever. Yet, rather than eschewing doomsday prophesies, he spells out a specific plan to save our world while there is still time. His vision is a hopeful one, as economically sound as it is environmentally necessary. Eloquent, practical and wise, this book should be read and studied by anyone concerned with the fate of the natural world.

From the Trade Paperback edition.

Editorial Reviews

The Barnes & Noble Review
Harvard biologist E. O. Wilson has long been one of the most prominent scientific voices to speak out about the crisis of species extinction that has engulfed the earth in the past half century. In this eloquent and readable book, Wilson unstintingly portrays the nightmarish scenario into which we are passing but also offers constructive ideas on how it might still be averted.

Beginning with a tour of microbial ecosystems that demonstrates how few of the planet's species we have even named, much less understood, Wilson tracks the staggering toll taken on the world's ecosystems by a proliferating Homo sapiens. He touches on the planet's hotspots, from Madagascar to China: particularly rich zones of plant and animal diversity that are the most critically threatened. In Hawaii, for instance, thousands of unique species evolved in isolation over centuries, only to be rapidly decimated by human activities and the introduction of alien species with which they cannot compete.

It is a grim toll, and one that we have heard with depressing regularity in recent years. But Wilson follows this sobering litany with a chapter of concrete hopes for the planet's future, from debt-for-nature swaps to the proliferation of environmental groups. One of the book's most interesting sections resurrects the idea of biophilia, "the innate tendency to focus on life and lifelike forms," which Wilson introduced several years ago. We all have deep and abiding connections with nature, and if they can be nourished (education will play a large role) and channeled into moral decisions, we still have a chance to save the planet's biodiversity from our other, baser motives.

Ever the scientific optimist, Wilson places faith in the ability of technology to get us out of the fixes into which it has put us: For example, he advocates the highly controversial genetic engineering of crops. But, intriguingly, Wilson has yielded some of the ground claimed in Consilience, where he placed science at the pinnacle of human endeavor. Here, this great scientist argues that our ability to protect what's left of the planet's biodiversity ultimately depends, more than anything, on an ethical commitment. Unless we harness what's noblest about ourselves as a species, we risk being the only ones left on a silenced, emptied, and impoverished planet. (Jonathan Cook)

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Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
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Random House
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Read an Excerpt

A Letter to Thoreau
Excerpted from the Prologue

I am at the site of your cabin on the edge of Walden Pond. I came because of your stature in literature and the conservation movement. I came because of all your contemporaries, you are the one I most need to
understand. As a biologist with a modern scientific library, I know more than Darwin knew. I can imagine the measured responses of that country gentleman to a voice a century and a half beyond his own. It is not a satisfying fantasy: the Victorians have for the most part settled into a comfortable corner of our remembrance. But I cannot imagine your responses, at least not all of them. You left too soon, and your restless spirit haunts us still.

I am here for a purpose: to become more Thoreauvian, and with that perspective better to explain to you, and in reality to others and not least to myself, what has happened to the world we both have loved. . .

The natural world in the year 2001 is everywhere disappearing before our eyes--cut to pieces, mowed down, plowed under, gobbled up, replaced by human artifacts.

No one in your time could imagine a disaster of this magnitude. Little more than a billion people were alive in the 1840s. They were overwhelmingly agricultural, and few families needed more than two or three acres to survive. The American frontier was still wide open. And far away on continents to the south, up great rivers, beyond unclimbed mountain ranges, stretched unspoiled equatorial forests brimming with the maximum diversity of life. These wildernesses seemed as unattainable and timeless as the planets and stars. That could not last, because the mood of Western civilization is Abrahamic. The explorers and colonists were guided by a biblical prayer: May we take possession of this land that God has provided and let it drip milk and honey into our mouths, forever.

Now, more than six billion people fill the world. The great majority are very poor; nearly one billion exist on the edge of starvation. All are struggling to raise the quality of their lives any way they can. That unfortunately includes the conversion of the surviving remnants of the natural environment. Half of the great tropical forests have been cleared. The last frontiers of the world are effectively gone. Species of plants and animals are disappearing a hundred or more times faster than before the coming of humanity, and as many as half may be gone by the end of this century. An Armageddon is approaching at the beginning of the third millennium. But it is not the cosmic war and fiery collapse of mankind foretold in sacred scripture. It is the wreckage of the planet by an exuberantly plentiful and ingenious humanity.

The situation is desperate--but there are encouraging signs that the race can be won. Population growth has slowed, and if the present trajectory holds, it is likely to peak between eight and ten billion people by century's end. That many people, experts tell us, can be accommodated with a decent standard of living, but just barely: the amount of arable land and water available per person, globally, is already declining. In solving the problem, other experts tell us, it should also be possible to shelter most of the vulnerable plant and animal species.

In order to pass through the bottleneck, a global land ethic is urgently needed. Not just any global land ethic that might happen to enjoy agreeable sentiment, but one based on the best understanding of ourselves and the world around us that science and technology can provide. Surely the rest of life matters. Surely our stewardship is its only hope. We will be wise to listen carefully to the heart, then act with rational intention with all the tools we can gather and bring to bear.

Henry, my friend, thank you for putting the first element of that ethic in place. Now it is up to us to summon a more encompassing wisdom. The living world is dying; the natural economy is crumbling beneath our busy feet. We have been too self-absorbed to foresee the long-term consequences of our actions, and we will suffer a terrible loss unless we shake off our delusions and move quickly to a solution. Science and technology led us into this bottleneck. Now science and technology must help us find our way through and out.

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What People are saying about this

Kathryn S. Fuller
In The Future of Life, E.O. Wilson delivers an impassioned plea for a new human ethic based on a wiser, more careful stewardship of our vanishing natural world. Wilson invites us to share his optimism that we still have an opportunity to save the living things and wild places that sustain us and give us hope.--Kathryn S. Fuller, President, World Wildlife Fund

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Future of Life 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Edward Wilson's book 'The Future of Life' is a lucid, superbly crafted book from one of America's most famous scientists. The scope that this novel takes is excellent, moving in from the state of the global to as small a microcosm as a single branch of a tree in the rain forest. He never talks down to his audience, and the writing flows along a steady clip. In short, while it may be a bit outdated when it comes to some data concerning things such as global warming (it was written a few years ago), 'The Future of Life' is a book of the highest order, one that shines with a great love for humanity and to be read and reread for years with one's family.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
I've been a close observer of mankind's relentless destruction of our ONLY HOME for over 40 years. Mother Nature has been pretty forgiving up until now, but we're pushing many areas beyond their survival point. That's not very wise of us, is it? If you want to know how the rest of your life, your children's lives, and their children's lives will be effected in the near future, read this book. It's not a plesant picture, but it's about time someone collected and printed the truth for all to see. 'Environmental Concern' seems to come and go like a fad, but the real problems are only made worse by our continuing refusal to work WITH nature. Are our children willing OR able to pay the bills we're running up for them? We can begin by paying attention to the daily environmental news. Those scattered 'facts' are not free-standing events, they are all part of the interwoven moasic of life, and we MUST begin to Understand, Care, and Act before it's too late.
Guest More than 1 year ago
My name is Hugo and I enjoyed this title for many reasons. In fact, I enjoyed so much that I am now an intern for BOS-USA. Now, I was wondering if the publisher would be interested in donating some copies for a silent auction where the main guest will be Willie Smitts. This auction will be held in Los Angeles this month. I believe that people would find the book very appealing, and at the same time we can all provide more knowledge to the public and encourage a sense for awareness. Please contact me at hugoperez26@hotmail.com if there is any way the publisher would be willing to donate some copies. Thank You
Guest More than 1 year ago
This story will tell the pain and courage of boat people under Communist control after April 30, 1975. It relates horrible incidents that happened to a million families, including my own when the Communist took over the South Viet-Nam. terrible, but the true,tragedies,suffering, worrying and carrying of a million boat people in the high seas who escaped with no hope, no sense of direction, and not knowing how long their dangerous trip would last.